This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
320 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 320
Material to categorize
  1. C. P. A. (1957). The Idealist Tradition. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 11 (1):170-170.
  2. J. D. Bastable (1958). The Idealist Tradition. Philosophical Studies 8:197-199.
  3. Andrea Cachel (2010). Crença no mundo exterior: um diálogo entre Hume e Berkeley. Princípios 14 (21):125-146.
    No Tratado, Hume procura investigar as causas da crença nos objetos exteriores, admitindo ser impossível provar se os mesmos existem ou náo. Sua análise consistirá na investigaçáo da origem da inteligibilidade das noções de continuidade e distinçáo dos objetos sensíveis, em última instância, a crença do senso comum na continuidade e distinçáo das próprias percepções. Este texto pretende mostrar como essa discussáo humeana é um diálogo direto com a filosofia berkeleyana, a defesa humeana da crença na matéria implicando inicialmente uma (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. William C. Charron (1976). "Berkeley," by Harry M. Bracken. Modern Schoolman 54 (1):92-92.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ralph Hanna (1989). Sir Thomas Berkeley and His Patronage. Speculum 64 (4):878-916.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ralph Iii (1989). Sir Thomas Berkeley and His Patronage. Speculum 64 (4):878-916.
    Sir Thomas Berkeley has scarcely more than a liminal status among literary scholars and historians, even those who study fourteenth-century England. We may rather dimly remember him as an aristocratic spear carrier in Shakespeare's Richard II, a reflection of real activities known to historians. Or we may recall that he sponsored an extraordinarily prolific and important translator, the Cornishman John Trevisa.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Wilhelm Lütterfelds (1996). Kant Oder Berkeley? Zum Aktuellen Streit Um den Korrekten Realismus. Perspektiven der Philosophie 22:305-340.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. James Mccosh (1886). Locke's Theory of Knowledge with a Notice of Berkeley. Clark.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Bernal Herrera Montero (1985). La Realidad En Kant y Berkeley. Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica 57:49-70.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David J. Stump (1995). Douglas M. Jesseph, Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (2):113-115.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Peter Walmsley (1995). Berkeley and the University. Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 14:63.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Richard A. Watson (1963). Berkeley in a Cartesian Context. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 65 (3=65):381-94.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Berkeley and Other Philosophers
  1. Fred Ablondi (2012). Hutcheson, Perception, and the Sceptic's Challenge. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):269-281.
    Francis Hutcheson's theory of perception, as put forth in his Synopsis of Metaphysics, bears a striking similarity to that of John Locke. In particular, Hutcheson and Locke both have at the centre of their theories the notion of ideas as representational entities acting as the direct objects of all of our perceptions. On first consideration, one might find this similarity wholly unremarkable, given the popularity of Locke's Essay. But the Essay was published in 1689 and the Synopsis in 1742, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.) (2011). Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Henry E. Allison (1973). Kant's Critique of Berkeley. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (1):43.
  4. Margaret Atherton (1996). Lady Mary Shepherd's Case Against George Berkeley. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4 (2):347 – 366.
  5. Margaret Atherton (1991). Corpuscles, Mechanism, and Essentialism in Berkeley and Locke. Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (1):47-67.
  6. M. R. Ayers (1982). Berkeley's Immaterialism and Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 13:51-69.
    Ever since its first publication critics of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason have been struck by certain strong formal resemblances between transcendental idealism and Berkeley's immaterialism. Both philosophers hold that the sensible world is mind-dependent, and that from this very mind-dependence we can draw a refutation of scepticism of the senses.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Teppei Baba (2008). Is Berkeley's Theory of Ideas A Variant of Locke's? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:9-15.
    I try to show that Berkeley's theory of ideas is not a variant of Locke's. We can find such an interpretation of Berkeley in Thomas Reid. So, we could call this interpretation a 'traditional interpretation'. This traditional interpretation has an influence still now, for example, Tomida interprets Berkeley in this line (Tomida2002). We will see that this traditional interpretation gives a serious problem to Berkeley (section 1). And I am going to present an argument against this traditional interpretation (section 2).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Winston H. F. Barnes (1940). Did Berkeley Misunderstand Locke? Mind 49 (193):52-57.
  9. D. Baumgardt (1933). Joseph, H. W. B., A Comparison of Kants Idealism with that of Berkeley. [REVIEW] Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 38:441.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 2. Clarendon Press (Paperback).
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, not as (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Hans Peter Benschop (1997). Berkeley, Lee and Abstract Ideas. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (1):55 – 66.
  12. David Berman (ed.) (2014). George Berkeley (Routledge Revivals): Eighteenth-Century Responses: Volume I. Routledge.
    The material reprinted in this two-volume set, first published in 1989, covers the first eighty-five years in responses to George Berkeley’s writings. David Berman identifies several key waves of eighteenth-century criticism surrounding Berkeley’s philosophies, ranging from hostile and discounted, to valued and defended. The first volume includes an account of the life of Berkeley by J. Murray and key responses from 1711 to 1748, whilst the second volume covers the years between 1745 and 1796. This fascinating reissue illustrates the breadth (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. David Berman (ed.) (2014). George Berkeley (Routledge Revivals): Eighteenth-Century Responses: Volume Ii. Routledge.
    The material reprinted in this two-volume set, first published in 1989, covers the first eighty-five years in responses to George Berkeley’s writings. David Berman identifies several key waves of eighteenth-century criticism surrounding Berkeley’s philosophies, ranging from hostile and discounted, to valued and defended. The first volume includes an account of the life of Berkeley by J. Murray and key responses from 1711 to 1748, whilst the second volume covers the years between 1745 and 1796. This fascinating reissue illustrates the breadth (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David Berman (2005). Berkeley and Irish Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum.
    George Berkeley -- On missing the wrong target -- Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment in Irish philosophy -- The culmination and causation of Irish philosophy -- Francis Hutcheson on Berkeley and the Molyneux problem -- The impact of Irish philosophy on the American Enlightenment -- Irish ideology and philosophy -- An early essay concerning Berkeley's immaterialism -- Mrs. Berkeley's annotations in An account of the life of Berkeley (1776) -- Some new Bermuda Berkeleiana -- The good bishop : new letters -- Beckett (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. David Berman (ed.) (1989). George Berkeley: Eighteenth-Century Responses. Garland Pub..
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Daniele Bertini (2008). Berkeley and Gentile. Idealistic Studies 37 (1):43-50.
    My purpose is to compare Berkeley’s and Gentile’s idealism, interpreting Berkeley’s Treatise, §§22–23, and Gentile’s reading of this passage. The Italian philosopher finds in Berkeley’s master argument the original source of the true idealistic way of thinking, but he believes that Berkeley has not been sufficiently consistent in deducing all the consequences from his new principle. This criticism is the ground of Gentile’s actual idealism. Comparing the two positions is very instructive both to elucidate the general issue of idealism and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Martha Brandt Bolton (2008). Berkeley and Mental Representation : Why Not a Lockean Theory of Ideas? In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
  18. Harry M. Bracken (1987). On Some Points in Bayle, Berkeley, and Hume. History of Philosophy Quarterly 4 (4):435 - 446.
  19. Harry M. Bracken (1977). Bayle, Berkeley and Hume. Eighteenth-Century Studies 11:227--45.
  20. Joseph William Browne (1972). Berkeley and Scholasticism. Modern Schoolman 49 (2):113-123.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. M. F. Burnyeat (1982). Idealism and Greek Philosophy: What Descartes Saw and Berkeley Missed. Philosophical Review 91 (1):3-40.
  22. G. N. Cantor (1977). Berkeley, Reid, and the Mathematization of Mid-Eighteenth-Century Optics. Journal of the History of Ideas 38 (3):429.
    Berkeley's "new theory of vision" and, In particular, His sensationalist solution to the problem of judging distance and magnitude were discussed by many eighteenth-Century authors who faced a variety of problem situations. More specifically, Berkeley's theory fed into the debate over whether the phenomena of vision were susceptible to mathematical analysis or were experientially determined. In this paper a variety of responses to berkeley are examined, Concluding with thomas reid's attempt to distinguish physical optics (which can be analyzed geometrically) from (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. James D. Carney (1959). G. E. Moore's Refutation of Berkeley's Idealism. Dissertation, The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Sébastian Charles (2004). Berkeley no país das Luzes: ceticismo e solipsismo no século XVIII. Doispontos 1 (2).
    A influência do ceticismo nos século XVI e XVII é por demais evidente para ser posta em questão. De Montaigne a Bayle, parece que o cético foi o promotor tanto de uma refutação radical dos princípios metafísicos escolásticos e depois cartesianos quanto de uma crítica feroz às autoridades religiosas e políticas. Ora, esse papel parece ter se amenizado no Século das Luzes, ou melhor, se deslocado - somente as dimensões críticas do social continuaram pertinentes. Pretende-se mostrar aqui o pressuposto de (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Sébastien Charles (2002). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues. Background Source Materials Charles J. McCracken Et Ian C. Tipton Collection «Cambridge Philosophical Texts in Context» Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2000, X, 300 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (04):807-.
  26. Silvio Seno Chibeni (2013). As posições de Newton, Locke e Berkeley sobre a natureza da gravitação. Scientiae Studia 11 (4):811-839.
    Ao defender, nos Princípios matemáticos de filosofia natural, a existência de uma força de gravitação universal, Newton desencadeou uma onda de dúvidas e objeções filosóficas. Suas próprias declarações sobre a natureza da gravitação não são facilmente interpretáveis como formando um conjunto consistente de opiniões. Por um lado, logo após fornecer as três definições de "quantidades de forças centrípetas" (Defs. 6-8), Newton observa que está tratando tais forças "matematicamente", sem se pronunciar sobre sua realidade física. Mas, por outro lado, no Escólio (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Ewing Y. Chinn (1994). The Anti-Abstractionism of Dignāga and Berkeley. Philosophy East and West 44 (1):55-77.
  28. Grapham P. Conroy (1969). Did Hume Really Follow Berkeley. Philosophy 44 (169):238 - 242.
    The Bishop of Cloyne, George Berkeley, was the sort of philosopher who, although most genial himself, was quite apt to embroil opponents and critics of his time and of our own in long-lasting and sometimes unresolved controversies. In attacking the “infidel mathematicians”, the “minute philosophers” among the scientists, Berkeley initiated a controversy on behalf of religion by taking to task the theory of fluxions held by Sir Isaac Newton, his friends, and followers which, beginning with Berkeley's Analyst and replies to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Vincent M. Cooke (1972). Locke, Berkeley, Hume. [REVIEW] International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (4):621-623.
  30. Stephen H. Daniel (2008). Berkeley's Stoic Notion of Spiritual Substance. In , New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
    For Berkeley, minds are not Cartesian spiritual substances because they cannot be said to exist (even if only conceptually) abstracted from their activities. Similarly, Berkeley's notion of mind differs from Locke's in that, for Berkeley, minds are not abstract substrata in which ideas inhere. Instead, Berkeley redefines what it means for the mind to be a substance in a way consistent with the Stoic logic of 17th century Ramists on which Leibniz and Jonathan Edwards draw. This view of mind, I (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stephen H. Daniel (2001). Berkeley's Christian Neoplatonism, Archetypes, and Divine Ideas. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):239-258.
    Berkeley's doctrine of archetypes explains how God perceives and can have the same ideas as finite minds. His appeal of Christian neo-Platonism opens up a way to understand how the relation of mind, ideas, and their union is modeled on the Cappadocian church fathers' account of the persons of the trinity. This way of understanding Berkeley indicates why he, in contrast to Descartes or Locke, thinks that mind (spiritual substance) and ideas (the object of mind) cannot exist or be thought (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Stephen H. Daniel (2001). Edwards, Berkeley, and Ramist Logic. Idealistic Studies 31 (1):55-72.
    I will suggest that we can begin to see why Edwards and Berkeley sound so much alike by considering how both think of minds or spiritual substances notas things modeled on material bodies but as the acts by which things are identified. Those acts cannot be described using the Aristotelian subject-predicatelogic on which the metaphysics of substance, properties, attributes, or modes is based because subjects, substances, etc. are themselves initially distinguishedthrough such acts. To think of mind as opposed to matter, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Stephen H. Daniel (2001). The Ramist Context of Berkeley's Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (3):487 – 505.
    Berkeley's doctrines about mind, the language of nature, substance, minima sensibilia, notions, abstract ideas, inference, and freedom appropriate principles developed by the 16th-century logician Peter Ramus and his 17th-century followers (e.g., Alexander Richardson, William Ames, John Milton). Even though Berkeley expresses himself in Cartesian or Lockean terms, he relies on a Ramist way of thinking that is not a form of mere rhetoric or pedagogy but a logic and ontology grounded in Stoicism. This article summarizes the central features of Ramism, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. David (1986). Bayle, Berkeley, and Hume’s Metaphysics. In V. Cauchy (ed.), Philosophy and Culture: Proceedings of the 17th World Congress Of Philosophy, v. 4. Montreal: Editions Montmorency.
  35. G. E. Davie (1965). Berkeley's Impact on Scottish Philosophers. Philosophy 40 (153):222 - 234.
    In 1728, when the sixteen-year-old Hume, still apparently ‘at college’, was beginning, all unknown to his family, to turn his attention to philosophy, Edinburgh and Glasgow were swarming with earnest metaphysicians, many of them not much older than Hume himself. ‘It is well known’, the Ochtertyre papers relate, ‘that between the years 1723 and 1740 nothing was in more request with the Edinburgh literati, both laical and clerical, than metaphysical disquisitions’, and Locke, Clarke, Butler and Berkeley are mentioned as the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Philippe Devaux (1954). La place de Berkeley dans la philosophie moderne. Theoria 20 (1-3):1-22.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Antonio Carlos dos Santos (2011). Berkeley E Mandeville: Religião E Moralidade. Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):56-69.
  38. Lisa Downing, Occasionalism and Strict Mechanism: Malebranche, Berkeley, Fontenelle.
    The rich connections between metaphysics and natural philosophy in the early modern period have been widely acknowledged and productively mined, thanks in no small part to the work of Margaret Wilson, whose book, Descartes, served as an inspirational example for a generation of scholars. The task of this paper is to investigate one particular such connection, namely, the relation between occasionalist metaphysics and strict mechanism. My focus will be on the work of Nicholas Malebranche, the most influential Cartesian philosopher after (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 320