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  1. Robert J. Baum (1972). The Instrumentalist and Formalist Elements of Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 3 (2):119-134.
    The main thesis of this paper is that, Contrary to general belief, George berkeley did in fact express a coherent philosophy of mathematics in his major published works. He treated arithmetic and geometry separately and differently, And this paper focuses on his philosophy of arithmetic, Which is shown to be strikingly similar to the 19th and 20th century philosophies of mathematics known as 'formalism' and 'instrumentalism'. A major portion of the paper is devoted to showing how this philosophy of mathematics (...)
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  2. Jonathan Bennett (1994). On Translating Locke, Berkeley, and Hume Into English. Teaching Philosophy 17 (3):261-269.
    I have recently been collaborating with my colleague Stewart Thau in teaching a 200-level course on early modern philosophy. The students are given a "Guide to Reading" for each class's reading assignment, along with about six questions on the assignment, one of which is then selected as a mini-quiz in class at the start of the next lecture. Failures and no-shows in the quizzes have an effect on the final grades.
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  3. James Collins (1961). The Early Reception of Berkeley's Immaterialism, 1710-1733. The Modern Schoolman 38 (2):163-164.
  4. Stephen H. Daniel (2001). Edwards, Berkeley, and Ramist Logic. Idealistic Studies 31 (1):55-72.
    I will suggest that we can begin to see why Edwards and Berkeley sound so much alike by considering how both think of minds or spiritual substances notas things modeled on material bodies but as the acts by which things are identified. Those acts cannot be described using the Aristotelian subject-predicatelogic on which the metaphysics of substance, properties, attributes, or modes is based because subjects, substances, etc. are themselves initially distinguishedthrough such acts. To think of mind as opposed to matter, (...)
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  5. Robert Fogelin (1988). Hume and Berkeley on the Proofs of Infinite Divisibility. Philosophical Review 97 (1):47-69.
    Since both berkeley and hume are committed to the view that a line is composed of finitely many fundamental parts, They must find responses to the standard geometrical proofs of infinite divisibility. They both repeat traditional arguments intended to show that infinite divisibility leads to absurdities, E.G., That all lines would be infinite in length, That all lines would have the same length, Etc. In each case, Their arguments rest upon a misunderstanding of the concept of a limit, And thus (...)
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  6. I. Grattan-Guinness (1969). Berkeley's Criticism of the Calculus as a Study in the Theory of Limits. Janus 56:215--227.
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  7. Johannes Haag & Perler Dominik (eds.) (2010). Repräsentationalismus in der frühen Neuzeit. de Gruyter.
  8. Donald F. Henze (1977). Descartes Vs. Berkeley: A Study in Early Metaphilosophy. Metaphilosophy 8 (2-3):147-163.
  9. Douglas Jesseph (2008). Faith and Fluxions : Berkeley on Theology and Mathematics. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
  10. Douglas M. Jesseph (2005). Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press.
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  11. Douglas M. Jesseph (1993). Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. University of Chicago Press.
    In this first modern, critical assessment of the place of mathematics in Berkeley's philosophy and Berkeley's place in the history of mathematics, Douglas M. Jesseph provides a bold reinterpretation of Berkeley's work.
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  12. G. A. Johnston (1918). Berkeley's Logic of Mathematics. The Monist 28 (1):25-45.
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  13. Tom Jones (2005). Pope and Berkeley: The Language of Poetry and Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The first study dedicated to the relationship between Alexander Pope and George Berkeley, this book undertakes a comparative reading of their work on the visual environment, economics and providence, challenging current ideas of the relationship between poetry and philosophy in early eighteenth-century Britain. It shows how Berkeley's idea that the phenomenal world is the language of God, learnt through custom and experience, can help to explain some of Pope's conservative sceptical arguments, and also his virtuoso poetic techniques.
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  14. Richard W. F. Kroll (1985). Philosophical Writing: Locke, Berkeley, Hume. Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (3):437-439.
  15. David M. Levy (1992). Bishop Berkeley Exorcises the Infinite. Hume Studies 18 (2):511-536.
  16. Theodore Messenger (1982). Berkeley and Tymoczko on Mystery in Mathematics. In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
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  17. Michael Prince (1996). Philosophical Dialogue in the British Enlightenment: Theology, Aesthetics, and the Novel. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers the first full-length study of philosophical dialogue during the English Enlightenment. It explains why important philosophers - Shaftesbury, Mandeville, Berkeley and Hume - and innumerable minor translators, imitators and critics wrote in and about dialogue during the eighteenth century; and why, after Hume, philosophical dialogue either falls out of use or undergoes radical transformation. Philosophical Dialogue in the British Enlightenment describes the extended, heavily coded, and often belligerent debate about the nature and proper management of dialogue; and (...)
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  18. David Sherry (1993). Don't Take Me Half the Way: On Berkeley on Mathematical Reasoning. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science 24 (2):207-225.
  19. David Sherry (1987). The Wake of Berkeley's Analyst: Rigor Mathematicae? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (4):455-480.
  20. Colin M. Turbayne (1982). A Bibliography of George Berkeley 1963-1979. In , Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
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  21. Colin Murray Turbayne & Robert Appelbaum (1977). A Bibliography of George Berkeley, 1963-1974. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (1):83-95.
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  22. Colin Murray Turbayne & Robert Ware (1963). A Bibliography of George Berkeley, 1933-1962. Journal of Philosophy 60 (4):93-112.
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  23. J. O. Urmson (1985). Berkeley on Beauty. In John Foster & Howard Robinson (eds.), Essays on Berkeley: A Tercentennial Celebration. Oxford University Press.
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  24. William Uzgalis (2005). Berkeley and the Westward Course of Empire : On Racism and Ethnocentrism. In Andrew Valls (ed.), Race and Racism in Modern Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
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  25. Peter Walmsley (1990). The Rhetoric of Berkeley's Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Whereas previous studies have made George Berkeley (1685-1753) the object of philosophical study, Peter Walmsley assesses Berkeley as a writer, offering rhetorical and literary analyses of Berkeley's four major philosophical texts, A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, Alciphron, and Siris. Berkeley emerges from this study as an accomplished stylist who builds structures of affective imagery, creates dramatic voices in his texts, and masters the range of philosophical genres--the treatise, the dialogue, and the (...)
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  26. J. O. Wisdom (1993). Book Reviews : R. W. Houghton, David Berman, and M. T. Lapan, Images of Berkeley . Wolfhound Press, Dublin, 1986. Pp. 105, Paper (No Price Given. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):103-103.
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  27. J. O. Wisdom (1953). Berkeley's Criticism of the Infinitesimal. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 4 (13):22-25.
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  28. J. O. Wisdom (1953). The Unconscious Origin of Berkeley's Philosophy. London, Hogarth Press.
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