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  1. Robert Merrihew Adams (1973). Berkeley's “Notion” of Spiritual Substance. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 55 (1):47-69.
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  2. John W. Davis (1959). Berkeley's Doctrine of the Notion. Review of Metaphysics 12 (3):378 - 389.
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  3. Daniel Flage (1992). Relative Ideas and Notions. In Phillip D. Cummins & Guenter Zoeller (eds.), Minds, Ideas, and Objects: Essays in the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Company
  4. Daniel E. Flage (1987). Berkeley's Doctrine of Notions: A Reconstruction Based on His Theory of Meaning. St. Martin's Press.
  5. Daniel E. Flage (1985). Berkeley's Notions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45 (3):407-425.
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  6. Antony Flew (1989). Berkeley's Doctrine of Notions: A Reconstruction Based on His Theory of Meaning. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (4):622-624.
  7. Melissa Frankel (2009). Something-We-Know-Not-What, Something-We-Know-Not-Why: Berkeley, Meaning and Minds. Philosophia 37 (3):381-402.
    It is sometimes suggested that Berkeley adheres to an empirical criterion of meaning, on which a term is meaningful just in case it signifies an idea (i.e., an immediate object of perceptual experience). This criterion is thought to underlie his rejection of the term ‘matter’ as meaningless. As is well known, Berkeley thinks that it is impossible to perceive matter. If one cannot perceive matter, then, per Berkeley, one can have no idea of it; if one can have no idea (...)
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  8. E. J. Furlong (1975). Complementary Notions: A Critical Study of Berkeley's Theory of Concepts. [REVIEW] Mind 84 (335):460.
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  9. Stavroula Glezakos (2009). Comments on Melissa Frankel's “Something-We-Know-Not-What, Something-We-Know-Not Why: Berkeley, Meaning and Minds”. Philosophia 37 (3):403-407.
  10. Reinhardt Grossmann (1960). Digby and Berkeley on Notions. Theoria 26 (1):17-30.
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  11. James Hill (2010). The Synthesis of Empiricism and Innatism in Berkeley’s Doctrine of Notions. Berkeley Studies:3-15.
    This essay argues that Berkeley’s doctrine of notions is an account of concept-formation that offers a middle-way between empiricism and innatism, something which Berkeley himself asserts at Siris 308. First, the widespread assumption that Berkeley accepts Locke’s conceptual empiricism is questioned, with particular attention given to Berkeley’s views on innatism and ideas of reflection. Then, it is shown that Berkeley’s doctrine of notions comes very close to the refined form ofinnatism to be found in Descartes’ later writings and in Leibniz. (...)
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  12. Richard N. Lee (1990). What Berkeley's Notions Are. Idealistic Studies 20 (1):19-41.
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  13. Charles J. McCracken (1986). Berkeley's Notion of Spirit. History of European Ideas 7 (6):597-602.
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  14. J. Murphy (1965). Berkeley and the Metaphor of Mental Sustance. Ratio 7 (2):170-179.
  15. Desirée Park (1981). Notions: The Counter-Poise of the Berkeleyan Ideas. Giornale di Metafisica. Nuova Serie Torino 3 (2):243-265.
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  16. Désirée Park (1972). Complementary Notions: A Critical Study of Berkeley's Theory of Concepts. Martinus Nijhoff.
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  17. Desiree Park (1968). Berkeley's Theory of Notions. Dissertation, Indiana University
    More than two hundred and fifty years have elapsed since George Berkeley first published his Principles of Human Knowledge and thereby divided the intelligible world into “notions” and “ideas". In the ensuing period, the more articulate world has shown a marked preference for treating only his theory of “ideas” .The result has been misleading. It is therefore the purpose of this essay to present Berkeley' s theory of “notions”, in so far as it can be gleaned from the pages of (...)
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  18. A. D. Woozley (1976). Berkeley's Doctrine of Notions and Theory of Meaning. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (4):427-434.