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  1. Geneviève Brykman (2008). On Human Liberty in Berkeley's Alciphron VII. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
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  2. Phillip D. Cummins (2005). Berkeley on Minds and Agency. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. 190.
  3. Patrick Fleming (2006). Berkeley's Immaterialist Account of Action. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):415-429.
    : A number of critics have argued that Berkeley's metaphysics can offer no tenable account of human agency. In this paper I argue that Berkeley does have a coherent account of action. The paper addresses arguments by C.C. W. Taylor, Robert Imlay, and Jonathan Bennett. The paper attempts to show that Berkeley can offer a theory of action, maintain many of our common intuitions about action, and provide a defensible solution to the problem of evil.
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  4. James Harris (2010). Berkeley on the Inward Evidence of Freedom. In Laurent Jaffro, Genevieve Brykman & Claire Schwartz (eds.), Berkeley's Alciphron: English Text and Essays in Interpretation. Georg Olms Verlag.
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  5. Robert Imlay (1995). Berkeley and Action. In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  6. Sukjae Lee (2012). Berkeley on the Activity of Spirits. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):539-576.
    This paper propounds a new reading of Berkeley's account of the activity of finite spirits. Against existing interpretations, the paper argues that Berkeley does not hold that we causally contribute to the movement of our bodies. In contrast, our volitions to move our bodies are but occasions for God to cause their movement. In answer to the question of wherein then consists our activity, the paper proposes that our activity consists in the dual powers to produce (1) our volitions ? (...)
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  7. Craig Lehman (1981). Will, Ideas, and Perception in Berkeley's God. Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):197-203.
  8. Thomas M. Lennon (2001). Berkeley on the Act-Object Distinction. Dialogue 40 (04):651-.
  9. Jeffrey K. McDonough, Comments on Sukjae Lee's “Berkeley on the Activity of Spirits”.
    Comments on Sukjae Lee's "Berkeley on the Activity of Spirits," presented at Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Baltimore, MD, December 2007.
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  10. Jeffrey K. McDonough (2008). Berkeley, Human Agency and Divine Concurrentism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 567-590.
    This paper aims to offer a sympathetic reading of Berkeley’s often maligned account of human agency. The first section briefly revisits three options concerning the relationship between human and divine agency available to theistically minded philosophers in the medieval and early modern eras. The second argues that, of those three views, only the position of concurrentism is consistent with Berkeley’s texts. The third section explores Berkeley’s reasons for adopting concurrentism by highlighting three motivating considerations drawn from his larger philosophical system. (...)
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  11. John Russell Roberts (2010). 'Strange Impotence of Men': Immaterialism, Anaemic Agents, and Immanent Causation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):411-431.
  12. Catherine Wilson (1995). On Imlay's "Berkeley and Action&Quot;. In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  13. A. D. Woozley (1985). Berkeley on Action. Philosophy 60 (233):293 - 307.
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