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  1. Margaret Atherton (2010). Berkeley's Last Word on Spirit'. In Petr Glombíček & James Hill (eds.), Essays on the Concept of Mind in Early-Modern Philosophy. Cambridge Scholars 115--30.
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  2. Margaret Atherton (1983). The Coherence of Berkeley's Theory of Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 43 (3):389-399.
    Berkeley has been notoriously charged with inconsistency because he held that spiritual substance exists, Although he argued against the existence of material substance. Berkeley is only inconsistent on the assumption that his argument in favor of spiritual substance parallels the rejected argument for material substance. I show that berkeley is relying on quite a different argument, One perfectly consistent with his theory of ideas, Based on presuppositions the germs of which can be found in the thought of his predecessors in (...)
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  3. William H. Beardsley (2001). Berkeley on Spirit and Its Unity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (3):259 - 277.
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  4. Bertil Belfrage (2010). A Paradigm Shift in George Berkeley's Philosophy 1707-1709. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 200 (1):71 - 82.
    In this paper, I argue that there is a paradigm shift in George Berkeley's philosophy between his early, unpublished manuscripts (1707-1708) and the Theory of Vision (1709). If so, the traditional method of mixing published and unpublished material will lead to a confused picture of both his early, unpublished view and the doctrine that he published. Cet article montre qu'il y a eu un changement de paradigme dans la philosophie de Berkeley entre ses premiers manuscrits, non publiés, de 1707-1708 et (...)
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  5. Bertil Belfrage (1985). The Order and Dating of Berkeley's "Notebooks". Revue Internationale de Philosophie 39 (154):196.
  6. Aaron Ben-Zeev (1989). Reexamining Berkeley's Notion of Suggestion. Conceptus: Zeitschrift Fur Philosophie 23 (59):21-30.
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  7. Talia Mae Bettcher (2011). Berkeley's Theory of Mind: Some New Models1. Philosophy Compass 6 (10):689-698.
    Berkeley didn’t write very much about his ‘philosophy of mind’ and what he did write is rather perplexing and perhaps inconsistent. The most basic problem is that it just isn’t clear what a mind is for Berkeley. Unsurprisingly, many interpretations tend to understand Berkeleian spirit in models provided by other philosophers – interpretations in which Berkeleian spirit turns out to be a close cousin of the Cartesian ego, Lockean spiritual substratum, Lockean self, and Humean bundle of perceptions. Stephen H. Daniel (...)
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  8. Talia Mae Bettcher (1999). The Spirit and the Heap: Berkeley and Hume on the Self and Self-Consciousness. Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
    This dissertation concerns an important dispute between George Berkeley and David Hume. The dispute involves Berkeley's defense of his conception of the self as a spirit, a purely active being which perceives ideas; and Hume's elimination of that conception via his own, according to which the self is merely a heap, a causally connected system of perceptions. At bottom, this difference in the way that the self is conceptualized is informed by a fundamental difference in philosophical starting-point. Berkeley seeks to (...)
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  9. Harry M. Bracken (1975). Berkeley: Irish Cartesian. Philosophical Studies 24 (101):39-51.
  10. C. Branka Arsi (2003). The Passive Eye Gaze and Subjectivity in Berkeley. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  11. S. C. Brown (1971). Berkeley on the Unity of the Self. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 5:64-87.
    That the legacy of Berkeley's philosophy has been a largely sceptical one is perhaps rather surprising. For he himself took it as one of his objectives to undermine scepticism. He roundly denied that there were ‘any principles more opposite to Scepticism than those we have laid down’ . Yet Hume was to write of Berkeley that ‘most of the writings of that very ingenious author form the best lessons of scepticism, Bayle not excepted’. And it has become something of a (...)
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  12. Sébastien Charles (2010). Berkeley Et L'Imagination. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 200 (1):97 - 108.
    La place qu'occupe l'imagination dans la philosophie berkeleyenne semble ne pas poser de problème et n'être en rien originale, consistant en une simple reprise de la position lockéenne. Pourtant, en attribuant une spontanéité créatrice à l'imagination, qui en fait une faculté tout à fait particulière, et en insistant sur la puissance et les limites de cette même faculté, Berkeley réintroduit subrepticement un principe de différenciation au plan épistémologique, que l'on peut retrouver mutatis mutandis au plan moral à travers son opposition (...)
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  13. Sebastien Charles (2010). The Animal According to Berkeley. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer
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  14. Sébastien Charles (2009). Fictions in Berkeley:: From Epistemology to Morality. Berkeley Studies:13-21.
    In the classical era, imagination garnered poor press: fooling the senses, perverting judgment, subverting reason, skewing social relations, and generally providing wrong ideas about the way things are; it was a faculty of which to beware. Occasionally it was recognized as not being entirely without value—Descartes, for example, insisted on its great usefulness as a figurational function in simplifying the work of the understanding in geometry. The traditional tendency in philosophy, though, was to denigrate imagination for its misleading nature and (...)
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  15. Jonathan Dancy (2005). Berkeley's Active Self. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 1 (1):5-20.
    The Author considers the strengths and weaknesses of Berkeley’s account of what he calls indifferently the soul, mind, spirit or self. Such an account deserves far more credit than he has standardly been awarded for a significantly modern position, most of which has mistakenly been credited to Schopenhauer. The Aauthor relates Berkeley’s views to those recently expressed by Bill Brewer and attempts to isolate the crucial difference between Berkeley and Schopenhauer.
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  16. Stephen H. Daniel (2015). Berkeley, Hobbes, and the Constitution of the Self. In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 69-81.
    By focusing on the exchange between Descartes and Hobbes on how the self is related to its activities, Berkeley draws attention to how he and Hobbes explain the forensic constitution of human subjectivity and moral/political responsibility in terms of passive obedience and conscientious submission to the laws of the sovereign. Formulated as the language of nature or as pronouncements of the supreme political power, those laws identify moral obligations by locating political subjects within those networks of sensible signs. When thus (...)
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  17. Stephen H. Daniel (2013). How Berkeley Redefines Substance. Berkeley Studies 24:40-50.
    In several essays I have argued that Berkeley maintains the same basic notion of spiritual substance throughout his life. Because that notion is not the traditional (Aristotelian, Cartesian, or Lockean) doctrine of substance, critics (e.g., John Roberts, Tom Stoneham, Talia Mae Bettcher, Margaret Atherton, Walter Ott, Marc Hight) claim that on my reading Berkeley either endorses a Humean notion of substance or has no recognizable theory of substance at all. In this essay I point out how my interpretation does not (...)
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  18. Stephen H. Daniel (2013). Berkeley's Doctrine of Mind and the “Black List Hypothesis”: A Dialogue. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):24-41.
    Clues about what Berkeley was planning to say about mind in his now-lost second volume of the Principles seem to abound in his Notebooks. However, commentators have been reluctant to use his unpublished entries to explicate his remarks about spiritual substances in the Principles and Dialogues for three reasons. First, it has proven difficult to reconcile the seemingly Humean bundle theory of the self in the Notebooks with Berkeley's published characterization of spirits as “active beings or principles.” Second, the fact (...)
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  19. Liam P. Dempsey (2014). Newtonian Idealism: Matter, Perception, and the Divine Will. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):86-112.
    This paper investigates Isaac Newton's rather unique account of God's relation to matter. According to this account, corpuscles depend on a substantially omnipresent God endowing quantities of objective space with the qualities of shape, solidity, the unfaltering tendency to move in accord with certain laws, and—significantly—the power to interact with created minds. I argue that there are important similarities and differences between Newton's account of matter and Berkeley's idealism. And while the role played by the divine will might at first (...)
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  20. Santiago Echeverri Saldarriaga (2013). Subjetividad e inmaterialismo en la filosofía de George Berkeley. Estudios de Filosofía 27:127-148.
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  21. Reinaldo Elugardo (1978). An Alleged Incoherence in Berkeley's Philosophy. Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 4:177-189.
  22. Alexander Campbell Fraser (1909). Berkeley and Spiritual Realism. Philosophical Review 18 (4):455-456.
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  23. S. A. Grave (1962). A Note on Berkeley's Conception of the Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (4):574-576.
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  24. Devin Henry (2000). Berkeley's Passive Mind. Minerva 4.
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  25. Marc Hight & Walter Ott (2004). The New Berkeley. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):1 - 24.
  26. Marie Hungerman (1985). Comment on Charles McCracken's 'Berkeley on the Nature of Mind'. Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 10:52-56.
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  27. Edward George King (1965). The Concept of Spiritual Substance in the Empiricist Philosophy of George Berkeley. Dissertation, University of Notre Dame
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  28. Charles Mccracken (1985). Berkeley on the Nature of Mind. Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 10.
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  29. Charles J. McCracken (1988). Berkeley's Cartesian Concept of Mind. The Monist 71 (4):596-613.
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  30. Robert McKim (1989). Berkeley's Active Mind. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 71 (3):335-343.
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  31. Robert James Mckim (1982). Matter and Spirit in Berkeley. Dissertation, Yale University
    Berkeley's opposition to materialism of all sorts is explored and explained. The textual evidence locates Berkeley in the 17th and 18th century tradition which saw materialism as the main source of religious and moral scepticism, and Berkeley's approach is clarified by a comparison with the criticisms of materialism presented by some of his less well known predecessors and contemporaries. The accepted account of the development of Berkeley's immaterialism is explored and rejected. ;The precise way in which spirit, both finite and (...)
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  32. Y. Michaud (1974). La formation de la problématique de la substance spirituelle chez Berkeley. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 79 (1):63 - 83.
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  33. Genevieve Migely (2007). Berkeley's Actively Passive Mind. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
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  34. George W. Miller (1965). The Commonplace Book and Berkeley's Concept Of The Self. Southern Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):23-32.
  35. Robert G. Muehlmann (1995). The Substance of Berkeley's Philosophy. In Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press
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  36. J. Murphy (1965). Berkeley and the Metaphor of Mental Sustance. Ratio 7 (2):170-179.
  37. Walter Ott (2006). Descartes and Berkeley on Mind: The Fourth Distinction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (3):437 – 450.
    The popular Cartesian reading of George Berkeley's philosophy of mind mischaracterizes his views on the relations between substance and essence and between an idea and the act of thought in which it figures. I argue that Berkeley rejects Descartes's tripartite taxonomy of distinctions and makes use of a fourth kind of distinction. In addition to illuminating Berkeley's ontology of mind, this fourth distinction allows us to dissolve an important dilemma raised by Kenneth Winkler.
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  38. M. Phillips (1985). Berkeley on Will, Some Philosophical Notes. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 39 (154):252-258.
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  39. George Pitcher (1981). Berkeley on the Mind's Activity. American Philosophical Quarterly 18 (3):221 - 227.
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  40. Santiago Echeverri Saldarriaga (2003). Subjetividad e inmaterialismo en la filosofía de George Berkeley. Estudios de Filosofía 27:127-148.
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  41. Ian C. Tipton (1966). Berkeley's View of Spirit. In Warren E. Steinkraus (ed.), New Studies in Berkeley's Philosophy. University Press of America 59--71.
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  42. M. Tomecek (2010). Berkeley's Philosophy of Spirit: Consciousness, Ontology, and the Elusive Subject, by Talia Mae Bettcher. [REVIEW] Mind 119 (473):185-188.
  43. Colin M. Turbayne (1982). Lending a Hand to Philonous: The Berkeley, Plato, Aristotle Connection. In Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  44. Colin Murray Turbayne (1962). Berkeley's Two Concepts of Mind (Part II). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (3):383-386.
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  45. Colin Murray Turbayne (1959). Berkeley's Two Concepts of Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (1):85-92.
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  46. Richard J. van Iten (1964). Berkeley's Analysis of Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 24 (3):375-382.
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  47. Kenneth P. Winkler (1985). Berkeley on Volition, Power, and the Complexity of Causation. History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):53 - 69.
  48. A. D. Woozley (1985). Berkeley on Action. Philosophy 60 (233):293-307.
    At the risk of proving myself such a caviller, I want to ask a question which I have seldom heard raised, and which I have never seen discussed in anything that I have read about Berkeley. If I am right, it poses a problem for his immaterialism, not only different, but coming from a different direction, from those objections that are commonly levelled against him. If I am wrong, it will show how right Berkeley was to stress the difficulty of (...)
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