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  1. Margaret Atherton (1983). The Coherence of Berkeley's Theory of Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 43 (3):389-399.
    Berkeley has been notoriously charged with inconsistency because he held that spiritual substance exists, Although he argued against the existence of material substance. Berkeley is only inconsistent on the assumption that his argument in favor of spiritual substance parallels the rejected argument for material substance. I show that berkeley is relying on quite a different argument, One perfectly consistent with his theory of ideas, Based on presuppositions the germs of which can be found in the thought of his predecessors in (...)
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  2. Sébastien Charles (2010). Berkeley Et L'Imagination. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de L'Étranger 200 (1):97 - 108.
    La place qu'occupe l'imagination dans la philosophie berkeleyenne semble ne pas poser de problème et n'être en rien originale, consistant en une simple reprise de la position lockéenne. Pourtant, en attribuant une spontanéité créatrice à l'imagination, qui en fait une faculté tout à fait particulière, et en insistant sur la puissance et les limites de cette même faculté, Berkeley réintroduit subrepticement un principe de différenciation au plan épistémologique, que l'on peut retrouver mutatis mutandis au plan moral à travers son opposition (...)
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  3. Sebastien Charles (2010). The Animal According to Berkeley. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
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  4. Stephen H. Daniel (2013). Berkeley's Doctrine of Mind and the “Black List Hypothesis”: A Dialogue. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):24-41.
    Clues about what Berkeley was planning to say about mind in his now-lost second volume of the Principles seem to abound in his Notebooks. However, commentators have been reluctant to use his unpublished entries to explicate his remarks about spiritual substances in the Principles and Dialogues for three reasons. First, it has proven difficult to reconcile the seemingly Humean bundle theory of the self in the Notebooks with Berkeley's published characterization of spirits as “active beings or principles.” Second, the fact (...)
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  5. S. A. Grave (1962). A Note on Berkeley's Conception of the Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (4):574-576.
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  6. Charles J. McCracken (1988). Berkeley's Cartesian Concept of Mind. The Monist 71 (4):596-613.
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  7. Robert McKim (1989). Berkeley's Active Mind. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 71 (3):335-343.
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  8. George W. Miller (1965). The Commonplace Book and Berkeley's Concept Of The Self. Southern Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):23-32.
  9. Robert G. Muehlmann (1995). The Substance of Berkeley's Philosophy. In , Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  10. J. Murphy (1965). Berkeley and the Metaphor of Mental Sustance. Ratio 7:170-179.
  11. Walter Ott (2006). Descartes and Berkeley on Mind: The Fourth Distinction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (3):437 – 450.
    The popular Cartesian reading of George Berkeley's philosophy of mind mischaracterizes his views on the relations between substance and essence and between an idea and the act of thought in which it figures. I argue that Berkeley rejects Descartes's tripartite taxonomy of distinctions and makes use of a fourth kind of distinction. In addition to illuminating Berkeley's ontology of mind, this fourth distinction allows us to dissolve an important dilemma raised by Kenneth Winkler.
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  12. M. Tomecek (2010). Berkeley's Philosophy of Spirit: Consciousness, Ontology, and the Elusive Subject, by Talia Mae Bettcher. [REVIEW] Mind 119 (473):185-188.
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  13. Colin M. Turbayne (1982). Lending a Hand to Philonous: The Berkeley, Plato, Aristotle Connection. In , Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  14. Kenneth P. Winkler (1985). Berkeley on Volition, Power, and the Complexity of Causation. History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):53 - 69.