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  1. Joseph Agassi (1975). The Future of Berkeley's Instrumentalism. International Studies in Philosophy 7:167-178.
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  2. Timo Airaksinen (2011). Light and Causality in Siris. In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars.
    George Berkeley's Siris (1744) has been a neglected work, for many reasons. Some of them are good and some bad. The book is difficult to decipher, mainly because of its ancient metaphysics. He talks about the world as an animal or plant. He speculates about man as a microcosm which is analogous to the universe as a macrocosm. He recommends tar-water as a universal medicine. This was understandable in his own time. But Siris is also a Newtonian treatise which both (...)
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  3. Timo Airaksinen (2010). Berkeley and Newton on Gravity in Siris. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  4. Gavin W. R. Ardley (1962). Berkeley's Philosophy of Nature. University of Auckland.
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  5. Margaret Atherton (1991). Corpuscles, Mechanism, and Essentialism in Berkeley and Locke. Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (1):47-67.
  6. S. Seth Bordner (2012). George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 32 (4):313-315.
  7. Bill Brewer, Berkeley and Modern Metaphysics.
    Notoriously, Berkeley combines his denial of the existence of mind-independent matter with the insistence that most of what common sense claims about physical objects is perfectly true (1975a, 1975b).1 As I explain (§ 1), he suggests two broad strategies for this reconciliation, one of which importantly subdivides. Thus, I distinguish three Berkeleyian metaphysical views. The subsequent argument is as follows. Reflection, both upon Berkeley’s ingenious construal of science as approaching towards an essentially indirect identification of the causal-explanatory ground of the (...)
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  8. Richard J. Brook (1973). Berkeley's Philosophy of Science. The Hague,M. Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION Philonous: You see, Hylas, the water of yonder fountain, how it is forced upwards, in a round column, to a certain height, at which it breaks ...
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  9. Genevieve Brykman (1982). Microscopes and Philosophical Method in Berkeley. In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
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  10. P. A. Byrne (1984). Berkeley, Scientific Realism and Creation. Religious Studies 20 (3):453 - 464.
    ‘That a corporeal substance, which hath absolute existence without the minds of spirits, should be produced out of nothing by the mere will of a spirit hath been looked upon as a thing so contrary to all reason, so impossible and absurd, that not only the most celebrated amongst the ancients, but even divers modern and Christian philosophers have thought matter co-eternal with the Deity.’.
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  11. Silvio Seno Chibeni (2013). As posições de Newton, Locke e Berkeley sobre a natureza da gravitação. Scientiae Studia 11 (4):811-839.
    Ao defender, nos Princípios matemáticos de filosofia natural, a existência de uma força de gravitação universal, Newton desencadeou uma onda de dúvidas e objeções filosóficas. Suas próprias declarações sobre a natureza da gravitação não são facilmente interpretáveis como formando um conjunto consistente de opiniões. Por um lado, logo após fornecer as três definições de "quantidades de forças centrípetas" (Defs. 6-8), Newton observa que está tratando tais forças "matematicamente", sem se pronunciar sobre sua realidade física. Mas, por outro lado, no Escólio (...)
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  12. Lisa Downing (2005). Berkeley's Natural Philosophy and Philosophy of Science. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. 230--265.
    Although George Berkeley himself made no major scientific discoveries, nor formulated any novel theories, he was nonetheless actively concerned with the rapidly evolving science of the early eighteenth century. Berkeley's works display his keen interest in natural philosophy and mathematics from his earliest writings (Arithmetica, 1707) to his latest (Siris, 1744). Moreover, much of his philosophy is fundamentally shaped by his engagement with the science of his time. In Berkeley's best-known philosophical works, the Principles and Dialogues, he sets up his (...)
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  13. Lisa Downing (1995). Berkeley's Case Against Realism About Dynamics. In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press. 197--214.
    While De Motu, Berkeley's treatise on the philosophical foundations of mechanics, has frequently been cited for the surprisingly modern ring of certain of its passages, it has not often been taken as seriously as Berkeley hoped it would be. Even A.A. Luce, in his editor's introduction to De Motu, describes it as a modest work, of limited scope. Luce writes: The De Motu is written in good, correct Latin, but in construction and balance the workmanship falls below Berkeley's usual standards. (...)
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  14. Lisa Downing, Occasionalism and Strict Mechanism: Malebranche, Berkeley, Fontenelle.
    The rich connections between metaphysics and natural philosophy in the early modern period have been widely acknowledged and productively mined, thanks in no small part to the work of Margaret Wilson, whose book, Descartes, served as an inspirational example for a generation of scholars. The task of this paper is to investigate one particular such connection, namely, the relation between occasionalist metaphysics and strict mechanism. My focus will be on the work of Nicholas Malebranche, the most influential Cartesian philosopher after (...)
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  15. Lisa J. Downing (1995). Siris and the Scope of Berkeley's Instrumentalism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (2):279 – 300.
    I. Introduction Siris, Berkeley's last major work, is undeniably a rather odd book. It could hardly be otherwise, given Berkeley's aims in writing it, which are three-fold: 'to communicate to the public the salutary virtues of tar-water,'1 to provide scientific background supporting the efficacy of tar-water as a medicine, and to lead the mind of the reader, via gradual steps, toward contemplation of God.2 The latter two aims shape Berkeley's extensive use of contemporary natural science in Siris. In particular, Berkeley's (...)
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  16. Lisa Jeanne Downing (1992). Berkeley's Dynamical Instrumentalism. Dissertation, Princeton University
    The aim of this dissertation is to explore a central aspect of Berkeley's philosophy of science, namely, his philosophical account of the status of Newton's mechanics. In De Motu, Berkeley's treatise on mechanics, he makes plain that he accepts Newton's mechanics as an excellent scientific theory, while refusing to admit the existence of physical forces. Thus, Berkeley is an anti-realist about Newtonian mechanics. In the dissertation, I seek to identify the grounds and nature of this anti-realism. ;Although Berkeley's motivations for (...)
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  17. Robert W. Faaborg (1999). Berkeley and the Argument From Microscopes. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):301–323.
  18. Lorne Falkenstein (1991). Book Review:Particles and Ideas: Bishop Berkeley's Corpuscularian Philosophy Gabriel Moked. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 58 (1):133-.
  19. Daniel Garber (1982). Locke, Berkeley, and Corpuscular Scepticism. In Colin Murray Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays. University of Minnesota Press.
  20. Jack Glazbrook, Berkeley's Analysis of Science.
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  21. B. H. (1963). Berkeley's Philosophy of Nature. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):797-797.
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  22. Marc A. Hight (2010). Berkeley's Metaphysical Instrumentalism. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Science and Religion in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
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  23. Gerard Hinrichs (1950). The Logical Positivism of Berkeley's "De Motu". Review of Metaphysics 3 (4):491 - 505.
  24. M. Hughes (1992). Newton, Hermes and Berkeley. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (1):1-19.
  25. Dale Jacquette (1993). Reconciling Berkeley's Microscopes in God's Infinite Mind. Religious Studies 29 (4):453 - 463.
    God knows or hath ideas; but His ideas are not convey'd to Him by sense, as ours are. Your not distinguishing where there is so manifest a difference, makes you fancy you see an absurdity where there is none.
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  26. R. M. K. (1974). Berkeley's Philosophy of Science. Review of Metaphysics 28 (2):339-339.
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  27. P. J. E. Kail (2010). Causation, Fictionalism, and Non-Cognitivism: Berkeley and Hume. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  28. John K. Kearney (1975). Thought, Language, and Meaning in Berkeley's Philosophy. New Scholasticism 49 (3):280-294.
    This paper evaluates karl popper's claim in his "conjectures and refutations" that berkeley's "nominalism" is at the root of his "instrumentalist" philosophy of science. the argument of the paper is divided into two parts. in the first part, it is argued that, according to berkeley, "thought" is ontologically prior to "language". in this sense, berkeley's instrumentalism is rooted in a metaphysics of experience and not in a theory of language. in the second part, it is argued that the meaning of (...)
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  29. Basileios Kroustallis (2004). Berkeley and the Moon Illusion. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (2):151 - 166.
  30. Silvia Manzo (2004). Éter, espírito animal e causalidade no Siris de George Berkeley: uma visão imaterialista da analogia entre macrocosmo e microcosmo. Studia Scientia 2 (2):179-205.
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  31. Nancy L. Maull (1982). Berkeley on the Limits of Mechanistic Explanation. In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
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  32. Lawrence A. Mirarchi (1982). Dynamical Implications of Berkeley's Doctrine of Heterogeneity: A Note on the Language Model of Nature. In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  33. Lawrence A. Mirarchi (1977). Force and Absolute Motion in Berkeley's Philosophy of Physics. Journal of the History of Ideas 38 (4):705-713.
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  34. Gabriel Moked (1988). Particles And Ideas: Bishop Berkeley's Corpuscularian Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
    Demonstrating that in George Berkeley's last major work, Siris, Berkeley had converted to a belief in the usefulness of the concept and existence of minute particles, Moked here posits that Berkeley developed a highly original brand of corpuscularian physics.
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  35. Gabriel Moked (1971). A Note on Berkeley's Corpuscularian Theories in Siris. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 2 (3):257-271.
  36. Gabriel Moked (1971). Particles and Minima the Immaterialism of George Berkeley.
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  37. W. H. Newton-Smith (1985). Berkeley's Philosophy of Science. In John Foster & Howard Robinson (eds.), Essays on Berkeley: A Tercentennial Celebration. Oxford University Press.
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  38. Silvia Parigi (2010). "Scire Per Causas" Versus "Scire Per Signa": George Berkeley and Scientific Explanation in Siris. In George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  39. Kenneth L. Pearce, Berkeley's Meta-Ontology: Bodies, Forces, and the Semantics of 'Exists'.
    To the great puzzlement of his readers, Berkeley begins by arguing that nothing exists other than minds and ideas, but concludes by claiming to have defended the existence of bodies. How can Berkeley's idealism amount to such a defense? I introduce resources from Berkeley's philosophy of language, and especially his analysis of the discourse of physics, to defend a novel answer to this question. According to Berkeley, the technical terms of physics are meaningful despite failing to designate any reality; their (...)
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  40. Luc Peterschmitt (2011). Berkeley's New Theory of Vision: Science of Metaphysics? In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil` Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars.
    Bertil Belfrage has recently given a "new interpretation" of Berkeley's Theory of Vision. He opposes the view that it is a contribution to metaphysics; it is, he argues, a scientific theory comparable with physics and mechanics. I shall argue that both alternatives are mistaken: Berkeley does not present any definite theory at all in his essay on vision; it is not a contribution either to science or metaphysics but an essay towards a theory that would include both scientific and metaphysical (...)
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  41. Luc Peterschmitt (2011). Berkeley Et la Chimie: Une Philosophie Pour la Chimie au Xviiie Siècle. Classiques Garnier.
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  42. Luc Peterschmitt (2010). Un impensé Des principes de la connaissance humaine : La physique mathématique. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 200 (1):19 - 29.
    J'entends montrer que Berkeley ne traite pas de la physique mathématique dans les Principes de la connaissance humaine, alors qu'il aurait dû le faire. En effet, la manière dont il conçoit la nature est, sur des points cruciaux (distinction des qualités premières et secondes, simplicité de la nature et des voies de Dieu), à l'opposé de ce qui fonde le traitement géométrique des phénomènes. Dans cette mesure, l'application des mathématiques reste un impensé de l'immatérialisme en 1710, et elle ne sera (...)
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  43. Luc Peterschmitt (2010). Berkeley and Chemistry in the Siris. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
    In this paper, I would like to show how it is possible to understand and comment on Berkeley’s Siris. This book is not that difficult nor that obscure. Siris is unusual: Berkeley seems to have or to invent a new philosophical style. However, firstly, it is still philosophy; and, secondly, it is necessary to stress that, unlike his first works, Siris was read everywhere in Europe.
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  44. Luc Peterschmitt (2008). Can Berkeley Be an Instrumentalist? Towards a Reappraisal of Berkeley's Philosophy of Science. Berkeley Studies 19:19-31.
  45. K. R. Popper (1953). A Note on Berkeley as Precursor of Mach. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 4 (13):26-36.
  46. Eric Schliesser (2005). ON THE ORIGIN OF MODERN NATURALISM: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF BERKELEY's RESPONSE TO A NEWTONIAN INDISPENSIBILITY ARGUMENT. Philosophica 76:45-66.
    I call attention to Berkeley’s treatment of a Newtonian indispensability argument against his own main position. I argue that the presence of this argument marks a significant moment in the history of philosophy and science: Newton’s achievements could serve as a separate and authoritative source of justification within philosophy. This marks the presence of a new kind of naturalism. A long the way, I argue against the claim tha t there is no explicit opposition or distinction between “philosophy” and “science” (...)
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  47. Bruce Silver (1972). Berkeley and the Mathematics of Materialism. New Scholasticism 46 (4):427-438.
  48. Doreen Silver (1993). In Support of the Foundational Importance of "an Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision" in the Philosophy of George Berkeley, with Due Regard to the Three Lights of His Theory of Vision and the Contemporary Relevance of Berkeley's Scientific Revisionism. Dissertation, York University (Canada)
    An Essay Towards A New Theory Of Vision addresses a problem which George Berkeley encountered in formulating the metaphysics of his philosophy of immaterialism in A Treatise Concerning The Principles Of Human Knowledge. In opposition to mechanical materialism, Berkeley argued that bodies do not exist without the mind, and that our everyday experience delivers clear evidence of the Divine Presence. The difficulty is that we normally conduct our lives in accordance with an independent physical world which exists in external space, (...)
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  49. Eduard I. Sorkin (2008). Rethinking Ideas of Newton, Berkeley and Mach Today. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:501-509.
    The report is dedicated to modern understanding of the correlation between science and religion that is based on the analysis of certain ideas formulated by Newton, Berkeley and Mach. Newton proceeded from the existence of infinite (absolute) Space that he interpreted as the Sensory of the intelligent omnipresent Being (God) who sees things themselves intimately, and throughly perceives and comprehends them. Human being also has his little “Sensoriums” perceiving the images of things, the Order and the Beauty of their arrangement. (...)
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  50. Warren E. Steinkraus (1984). Berkeley, Epistemology, and Science. Idealistic Studies 14 (3):183-192.
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