This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
30 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. M. W. Beal (1976). Berkeley's Deletions. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):455 - 478.
  2. George Berkeley (2008/1969). Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    A new theory of vision -- A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge (part i) -- Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous -- An essay on motion -- Alciphron, or, The minute philosopher (excerpts) -- Siris: a chain of philosophical reflexions and inquiries concerning the virtues of tar-water (excerpts).
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. George Berkeley (1999/2009). Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues. Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosophers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. -/- There has never been such a radical critique of common sense and perception as that given in Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge (1710). His views were met with disfavour, and his (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. George Berkeley (1996). Principles of Human Knowledge ;. Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosphers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth-century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. This edition of Berkeley's two key works has an introduction which examines and in part defends his arguments for idealism, as well as offering a detailed analytical contents list, extensive philosophical notes, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. George Berkeley (1988). Principles of Human Knowledge ; and, Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. Penguin Books.
    INTRODUCTION* George Berkeley was born near Kilkenny in Ireland on March, of English descent. His grandfather, who had some connection with Lord Berkeley of ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. George Berkeley (1974). A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge ; Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, in Opposition to Sceptics and Atheists. In John Locke, George Berkeley & David Hume (eds.), The Empiricists. Anchor Books/Doubleday.
  7. George Berkeley (1963/1981). Works on Vision. Greenwood Press.
    A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge -- An essay towards a new theory of vision -- Alciphron, the fourth dialogue (excerpts) -- The theory of vision.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. George Berkeley (1963). The Principles of Human Knowledge, and Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. Cleveland, World Pub. Co..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. George Berkeley (1940/2003). A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. Dover Publications.
    If a tree falls in the forest and no one is present to hear it, does it make a sound? It does not, according to George Berkeley. Originally published in 1710, this landmark of Western philosophy introduced a revolutionary concept: immaterialism, which asserts that to be is to perceive or be perceived. The treatise opens with an assault on Locke's theory of abstract ideas and proceeds with arguments that sensible qualities exist only when perceived as ideas. Physical objects, he claims, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. George Berkeley (1901/2005). The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  11. George Berkeley (1901). Philosophical Works, 1705-21. In , The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  12. George Berkeley (1901). Philosophical Works, 1707-50. In , The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  13. George Berkeley (1734/1971). A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, 1734. Menston,Scolar Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. George Berkeley (1710). A Treatise on the Principles of Human Knowledge. Aaron Rhames.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Sébastien Charles (2002). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues. Background Source Materials Charles J. McCracken Et Ian C. Tipton Collection «Cambridge Philosophical Texts in Context» Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2000, X, 300 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (04):807-.
  16. Graham P. Conroy (1971). Berkeley: Principles of Human Knowledge: Text and Critical Essays. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (4):510-512.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Gale W. Engle (1968). Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge. Belmont, Calif.,Wadsworth Pub. Co..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Daniel E. Flage (2004). Berkeley's Epistemic Ontology: The Principles. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):25 - 60.
  19. Robert J. Fogelin (2001). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Berkeley and the Principles of Human Knowledge. Routledge.
    In this GuideBook, Fogelin offers a thorough commentary of the text of the Principles of Human Knowledge and guides the reader through the philosophical complexities of Berkeley's thought and its importance today. Among the topics discussed are Berkeley's life and the background of the Principles , the ideas and text in the Treatise and his continuing importance to philosophy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Henry R. Frankel (1977). Berkeley's Concept of Mind as Presented in Book II Ofthe Principles. Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):37-51.
  21. Roland Hall (1968). Hume's Actual Use of Berkeley's "Principles". Philosophy 43 (165):278 - 280.
  22. G. A. Johnston (1938). The Principles of Human Knowledge. By George Berkeley. Edited, with an Analysis and Appendix, by T. E. Jessop M.A., B.Litt., Professor of Philosophy in the University College of Hull. (London: A. Brown & Sons, Ltd. 1937. Pp. Xix + 148. Price 2s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (51):350-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. P. J. E. Kail (2007). Berkeley, the Ends of Language, and the Principles of Human Knowledge. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107 (1pt3):265-278.
    This paper discusses some key connections between Berkeley's reflections on language in the introduction to his Treatise on the Principles of Human Knowledge and the doctrines espoused in the body of that work, in particular his views on vulgar causal discourse and his response to the objection that his metaphysics imputes massive error to ordinary thought. I argue also that there is some mileage in the view that Berkeley's thought might be an early form of non-cognitivism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. M. B. M. (1969). Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge. Review of Metaphysics 22 (4):770-770.
  25. Charles J. McCracken & I. C. Tipton (eds.) (2000). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues: Background Source Materials. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume sets Berkeley's philosophy in its historical context by providing selections from: firstly, works that deeply influenced Berkeley as he formed his main doctrines; secondly, works that illuminate the philosophical climate in which those doctrines were formed; and thirdly, works that display Berkeley's subsequent philosophical influence. The first category is represented by selections from Descartes, Malebranche, Bayle, and Locke; the second category includes extracts from such thinkers as Regius, Lanion, Arnauld, Lee, and Norris; while reactions to Berkeley, both positive (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Alasdair Richmond (2009). Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge: A Reader's Guide. Continuum.
    Note on the text of the principles -- Context -- Biography -- Berkeley's philosophical background -- Overview of themes -- Teading the text -- The principles : introduction -- The principles : part one -- The objects and subject of knowledge : ideas and spirit -- Unperceived existence : a nicer strain of abstraction -- Problems for materialism -- A Cartesian dream argument -- The master argument -- From the inertness of ideas to the existence of God -- Philosophical objections (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Tom Stoneham (2003). Review: Berkeley and the Principles of Human Knowledge. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (445):126-130.
  28. Colin Murray Turbayne (ed.) (1970). A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge / George Berkeley with Critical Essays. Bobbs-Merrill.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. G. J. Warnock (1965). The Dialectic of Immaterialism: An Account of the Making of Berkeley's Principles. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 15 (60):264.
  30. Roger Woolhouse & George Berkeley (1988/2009). Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues. In Howard Robinson & George Berkeley (eds.), Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. Penguin.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosophers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. -/- There has never been such a radical critique of common sense and perception as that given in Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge (1710). His views were met with disfavour, and his (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation