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  1. George Berkeley (2008/1969). Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    A new theory of vision -- A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge (part i) -- Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous -- An essay on motion -- Alciphron, or, The minute philosopher (excerpts) -- Siris: a chain of philosophical reflexions and inquiries concerning the virtues of tar-water (excerpts).
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  2. George Berkeley (2007). Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous in Opposition to Sceptics and Atheists. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub. Ltd..
  3. George Berkeley (2005). Drei Dialoge Zwischen Hylas Und Philonous. Meiner.
    1713 erschien in London "Drei Dialoge zwischen Hylas und Philonous" von George Berkeley.
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  4. George Berkeley (2004). Selection From Three Dialogues. In Tim Crane & Katalin Farkas (eds.), Metaphysics: A Guide and Anthology. Oup Oxford.
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  5. George Berkeley (1999/2009). Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues. Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosophers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. -/- There has never been such a radical critique of common sense and perception as that given in Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge (1710). His views were met with disfavour, and his (...)
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  6. George Berkeley (1998). Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. Oxford University Press.
    First published in 1713, this work was designed as a vivid and persuasive presentation of the remarkable picture of reality that Berkeley had first presented two years earlier in his Principles of Human Knowledge. His central claim there, as here, was that physical things consist of nothing but ideas in minds--that the world is not material but mental. Berkeley uses this thesis as the ground for a new argument for the existence of God, and the dialogue form enables him to (...)
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  7. George Berkeley (1988). Principles of Human Knowledge ; and, Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. Penguin Books.
    INTRODUCTION* George Berkeley was born near Kilkenny in Ireland on March, of English descent. His grandfather, who had some connection with Lord Berkeley of ...
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  8. George Berkeley (1974). A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge ; Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, in Opposition to Sceptics and Atheists. In John Locke, George Berkeley & David Hume (eds.), The Empiricists. Anchor Books/Doubleday.
  9. George Berkeley (1901/2005). The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  10. George Berkeley (1901). Philosophical Works, 1707-50. In , The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  11. George Berkeley (1713). Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. G. James.
    <Hylas> It is indeed something unusual; but my thoughts were so taken up with a subject I was discoursing of last night, that finding I could not sleep, ...
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  12. Sébastien Charles (2002). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues. Background Source Materials Charles J. McCracken Et Ian C. Tipton Collection «Cambridge Philosophical Texts in Context» Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2000, X, 300 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (04):807-.
  13. Sébastien Charles (2001). Trois dialogues entre Hylas et Philonous George Berkeley Traduction inédite, présentation, notes, dossier et index par Geneviève Brykman et Roselyne Dégremont Collection «GF-Flammarion», no 990 Paris, Flammarion, 1998, 308 p. [REVIEW] Dialogue 40 (01):194-.
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  14. Willis Doney (1952). Two Questions About Berkeley. Philosophical Review 61 (3):382-391.
  15. Daniel Flage (2008). Berkeley's Epistemic Ontology : The Three Dialogues. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
  16. D. M. Jesseph (2004). Berkeley's World: An Examination of the Three Dialogues. Philosophical Review 113 (4):571-574.
  17. Charles J. McCracken & I. C. Tipton (eds.) (2000). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues: Background Source Materials. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume sets Berkeley's philosophy in its historical context by providing selections from: firstly, works that deeply influenced Berkeley as he formed his main doctrines; secondly, works that illuminate the philosophical climate in which those doctrines were formed; and thirdly, works that display Berkeley's subsequent philosophical influence. The first category is represented by selections from Descartes, Malebranche, Bayle, and Locke; the second category includes extracts from such thinkers as Regius, Lanion, Arnauld, Lee, and Norris; while reactions to Berkeley, both positive (...)
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  18. George S. Pappas (2007). Review: Berkeley's World: An Examination of the Three Dialogues. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (463):779-781.
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  19. Désirée Park (1981). Prior and Williams on Berkeley. Philosophy 56 (216):231 - 241.
  20. Michael Prince (1996). Philosophical Dialogue in the British Enlightenment: Theology, Aesthetics, and the Novel. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers the first full-length study of philosophical dialogue during the English Enlightenment. It explains why important philosophers - Shaftesbury, Mandeville, Berkeley and Hume - and innumerable minor translators, imitators and critics wrote in and about dialogue during the eighteenth century; and why, after Hume, philosophical dialogue either falls out of use or undergoes radical transformation. Philosophical Dialogue in the British Enlightenment describes the extended, heavily coded, and often belligerent debate about the nature and proper management of dialogue; and (...)
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  21. David Raynor (1990). Hume and Berkeley's Three Dialogues. In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in the Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment.
  22. Tom Stoneham (2002). Berkeley's World: An Examination of the Three Dialogues. Oxford University Press.
    Tom Stoneham offers a clear and detailed study of Berkeley's metaphysics and epistemology, as presented in his classic work Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous, originally published in 1713 and still widely studied. Stoneham shows that Berkeley is an important and systematic philosopher whose work is still of relevance to philosophers today.
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  23. Colin M. Turbayne (1982). Lending a Hand to Philonous: The Berkeley, Plato, Aristotle Connection. In , Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  24. Roger Woolhouse & George Berkeley (1988/2009). Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues. In Howard Robinson & George Berkeley (eds.), Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. Penguin.
    Berkeley's idealism started a revolution in philosophy. As one of the great empiricist thinkers he not only influenced British philosophers from Hume to Russell and the logical positivists in the twentieth century, he also set the scene for the continental idealism of Hegel and even the philosophy of Marx. -/- There has never been such a radical critique of common sense and perception as that given in Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge (1710). His views were met with disfavour, and his (...)
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