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  1. David M. Armstrong (1956). Discussion: Berkeley's New Theory of Vision. Journal of the History of Ideas 17 (1):127-129.
    Most of the New Theory of Vision is an argument for a negative answer to Molyneux's question.// re primacy of vision in spatial perception: "most rational philosopher on this topic is Berkeley, whose New Theory of Vision presents in cogent detail the argument" (from Bennett 1966, p. 30, in note cites 41ff.).// Berkeley's criticisms of Locke: "If we really abstract from colour and hardness and all that 'belongs to sensation', so far from being left with 'pure' notions of extension and (...)
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  2. Margaret Atherton (1995). Berkeley Without God. In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.
  3. Bertil Belfrage (1992). The Constructivism of Berkeley's New Theory of Vision. In Phillip D. Cummins & Guenter Zoeller (eds.), Minds, Ideas, and Objects: Essays in the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Company.
  4. G. N. Cantor (1977). Berkeley, Reid, and the Mathematization of Mid-Eighteenth-Century Optics. Journal of the History of Ideas 38.
    Berkeley's "new theory of vision" and, In particular, His sensationalist solution to the problem of judging distance and magnitude were discussed by many eighteenth-Century authors who faced a variety of problem situations. More specifically, Berkeley's theory fed into the debate over whether the phenomena of vision were susceptible to mathematical analysis or were experientially determined. In this paper a variety of responses to berkeley are examined, Concluding with thomas reid's attempt to distinguish physical optics (which can be analyzed geometrically) from (...)
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  5. Rebecca Copenhaver (2014). Berkeley on the Language of Nature and the Objects of Vision. Res Philosophica 91 (1):29-46.
    Berkeley holds that vision, in isolation, presents only color and light. He also claims that typical perceivers experience distance, figure, magnitude, and situation visually. The question posed in New Theory is how we perceive by sight spatial features that are not, strictly speaking, visible. Berkeley’s answer is “that the proper objects of vision constitute an universal language of the Author of nature.” For typical humans, this language of vision comes naturally. Berkeley identifies two sorts of objects of vision: primary (light (...)
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  6. Walter E. Creery (1972). Berkeley's Argument for a Divine Visual Language. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (4):212 - 222.
  7. James P. Danaher (2002). Is Berkeley's World a Divine Language? Modern Theology 18 (3):361-373.
    George Berkeley (1685–1753) believed that the visible world was a series of signs that constituted a divine language through which God was speaking to us. Given the nature of language and the nature of the visual world, this paper examines to what extent the visual world could be a divine language and to what extent God could speak to us through it.
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  8. Katherine Dunlop (2011). The Role of Visual Language in Berkeley's Account of Generality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (3):525-559.
  9. Lorne Falkenstein (1994). Intuition and Construction in Berkeley's Account of Visual Space. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):63-84.
  10. Daniel E. Flage (2011). Analysis in Berkeley's Theory of Vision. In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars.
    In Section 38 of the Theory of Vision Vindicated, George Berkeley claims that he had used the method of analysis throughout the Theory of Vision. What does that mean? I first show that "analysis" denoted a fairly well-defined method in the early modern period: it was regularly described as a method of discovery. Then I show that the discussion of distance perception in the Theory of Vision exemplifies the method of analysis and may be seen as a modification of a (...)
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  11. Denis Forest (1997). George Berkeley Langage Visuel, Communication Universelle. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 187 (4):429 - 446.
    Le motif du langage visuel, qui traverse l'ensemble de l'oeuvre de Berkeley, n'est pas seulement le noyau de sa philosophie de la perception. Il est aussi le préréquisit d'une preuve originale de l'existence de Dieu, une évaluation spécifique de la nature de l'expérience commune et de la portée de l'explication scientifique, et il a des conséquences singulières quant à la doctrine de la création du monde. La première conclusion de l'article est qu'en dépit du rejet berkeleyen du mécanisme, on peut (...)
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  12. Richard Glauser (2010). Optique géométrique, images rétiniennes et corpuscules chez Berkeley. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 200 (1):7 - 18.
    Dans l'Essai pour une nouvelle théorie de la vision (1709) Berkeley critique un usage illégitime de l'optique géométrique dans l'explication de la perception des qualités spatiales. Toutefois, dans la Théorie de la vision défendue et expliquée (1733), il assigne à l'optique géométrique un rôle théorique positif, à côté de sa propre théorie de la vision. Nous défendons la thèse suivant laquelle une image rétinienne, chez Berkeley, est une configuration de corpuscules en mouvement, tangibles de droit. Cette lecture corrobore l'interprétation d'une (...)
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  13. R. Goeres (2004). Berkeley's Theory of The'visual Language of God'. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 111 (1):148-179.
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  14. Thomas M. Lennon (2007). The Genesis of Berkeley's Theory of Vision Vindicated. History of European Ideas 33 (3):321-329.
    Berkeley's Theory of Vision, or Visual Language Showing The Immediate Presence and Providence of A Deity, Vindicated And Explained was published in 1733, occasioned by an anonymous letter of the previous year to the London Daily Post Boy . The letter criticized Berkeley's New Theory of Vision , which had been published in 1709, but which had been appended to Berekely's Alciphron , published in 1732. No one has ever identified the author whose criticisms led Berkeley to his Theory of (...)
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  15. George S. Pappas (1987). Science and Metaphysics in Berkeley. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 2 (1):105 – 114.
  16. Robert Schwartz (1995). Seeing Distance From a Berkeleian Perspective. In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.
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