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  1. Džordž Barkli (1997). Božanski Vizuelni Jezik-Dijalog,(Četvrti Dijalog Knjige Alciphron or the Minute Philosopher, Selection From Berkeley, AC Frazer, Oxford, 1910). Theoria 40 (3):59-82.
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  2. George Berkeley (1965). Berkeley's Philosophical Writings. New York, Collier Books.
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  3. George Berkeley (1948-1957). In AA Luce, & TE Jessop. In A. A. Luce & T. E. Jessop (eds.), The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne. Thomas Nelson. 9.
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  4. George Berkeley (1899/1972). Selections From Berkeley, Annotated. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
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  5. George Berkeley (1871). The Works of George Berkeley, D.D. Macmillan.
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  6. Genevieve Brykman (2010). Short View and Synoptic Vision in Berkeley's Works. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de L Etranger 135 (1):83.
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  7. Sébastien Charles (2002). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues. Background Source Materials. Dialogue 41 (4):807-810.
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  8. Sébastien Charles (2001). Trois Dialogues Entre Hylas Et Philonous. Dialogue 40 (1):194-195.
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  9. Dale Jacquette (2012). Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. Broadview Press.
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  10. A. C. Lloyd & T. E. Jessop (1954). The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne, Volumes V and VI. Philosophical Quarterly 4 (17):375.
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  11. A. C. Lloyd & A. A. Luce (1956). The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne, Volume VII. Philosophical Quarterly 6 (25):382.
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  12. A. C. Lloyd & A. A. Luce (1952). The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne, Volume IV. Philosophical Quarterly 2 (7):189.
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  13. A. C. Lloyd, A. A. Luce & T. E. Jessop (1950). The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne. Vol. I, Philosophical Commentaries. Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision. Theory of Vision Vindicated.The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne. Vol. II, The Principles of Human Knowledge. First Draft of the Introduction to the Principles. Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous. Philosophical Correspondence with Johnson.The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne. Vol. III, Alciphron or The Minute Philosopher. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 1 (1):75.
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  14. A. C. Lloyd & Jean Pucelle (1955). Berkeley: Alciphron Ou le Pense-Menu. Introduction, Traduction Et Notes. Philosophical Quarterly 5 (20):284.
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  15. John Locke, George Berkeley & David Hume (eds.) (1974/1990). The Empiricists. Anchor Books/Doubleday.
    This volume includes the major works of the British Empiricists, philosophers who sought to derive all knowledge from experience. All essays are complete except that of Locke, which Professor Richard Taylor of Brown University has skillfully abridged.
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  16. L. Neri (1990). 'Siris', or Berkeley, George Bishop of Cloyne 2nd-Philosophy. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 10 (3):320-341.
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  17. Tom Stoneham, Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge.
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  18. Roland J. Teske (1977). "Philosophical Works, Including the Works on Vision," by George Berkeley, Introduction and Notes by M. R. Ayers. Modern Schoolman 54 (2):204-205.
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Berkeley: New Theory of Vision
  1. David M. Armstrong (1956). Discussion: Berkeley's New Theory of Vision. Journal of the History of Ideas 17 (1):127-129.
    Most of the New Theory of Vision is an argument for a negative answer to Molyneux's question.// re primacy of vision in spatial perception: "most rational philosopher on this topic is Berkeley, whose New Theory of Vision presents in cogent detail the argument" (from Bennett 1966, p. 30, in note cites 41ff.).// Berkeley's criticisms of Locke: "If we really abstract from colour and hardness and all that 'belongs to sensation', so far from being left with 'pure' notions of extension and (...)
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  2. Margaret Atherton (1995). Berkeley Without God. In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.
  3. Bertil Belfrage (1992). The Constructivism of Berkeley's New Theory of Vision. In Phillip D. Cummins & Guenter Zoeller (eds.), Minds, Ideas, and Objects: Essays in the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Company.
  4. George Berkeley (1963/1981). Works on Vision. Greenwood Press.
    A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge -- An essay towards a new theory of vision -- Alciphron, the fourth dialogue (excerpts) -- The theory of vision.
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  5. George Berkeley (1934). A New Theory of Vision, and Other Select Philosophical Writings. New York, E.P. Dutton & Co..
  6. George Berkeley (1901). Philosophical Works, 1705-21. In , The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  7. George Berkeley (1901). Philosophical Works, 1707-50. In , The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  8. George Berkeley (1901/2005). The Works of George Berkeley. Continuum.
  9. George Berkeley (1709). An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision. Aaron Rhames.
    touch 27 Thirrdly, the straining of the eye 28 The occasions which suggest distance have in their own nature no relation to it 29 A difficult case proposed by Dr. Barrow as repugnant to all the known theories 30 This case contradicts a ...
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  10. George Berkeley & Mary Whiton Calkins (1957). Essay, Principles, Dialogues with Selections From Other Writings. Edited by Mary Whiton Calkins. --. Scribner.
  11. George Berkeley & Mary Whiton Calkins (1929). Essay, Principles, Dialogues with Selections From Other Writings. C. Scribner's Sons.
  12. George Berkeley & Henry von-der-Heyde Cowell (1860). The Theory of Vision, or Visual Language, Shewing the Immediate Presence and Providence of a Deity, Vindicated and Explained, by the Author of Alciphron. By G. Berkeley, Ed. By H.V.H. Cowell. [REVIEW]
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  13. A. E. Best (1968). Misleading Questions and Irrelevant Answers in Berkeley's Theory of Vision. Philosophy 43 (164):138 - 151.
    Berkeley's essay on vision was published in the spring of 1709. It was recognised at once as a book of considerable importance, and there was a second edition within the first year. The author was still only 24. His design, he wrote, was to show the ‘manner we perceive by sight the distance, magnitude and situation of objects’. Hitherto, writers on optics had ‘proceeded on wrong principles’.
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  14. Michael Braund (2007). The Indirect Perception of Distance: Interpretive Complexities in Berkeley's Theory of Vision. Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):49-64.
  15. Richard Brook (2003). Berkeley's Theory of Vision: Transparency and Signification. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):691 – 699.
    By "transparency" with respect to Berkeley's theory of signs, I mean the notion that because of the often close association between signs and what they signify, we mistakenly think we sense what is signified by the sense that accesses the sign. I argue that although this makes sense for some examples, for a variety of reasons it's not really applicable to Berkeley's claim that we mistakenly think we immediately see distance ('outness') when we, in fact, immediately see only light and (...)
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  16. Rebecca Copenhaver (2014). Berkeley on the Language of Nature and the Objects of Vision. Res Philosophica 91 (1):29-46.
    Berkeley holds that vision, in isolation, presents only color and light. He also claims that typical perceivers experience distance, figure, magnitude, and situation visually. The question posed in New Theory is how we perceive by sight spatial features that are not, strictly speaking, visible. Berkeley’s answer is “that the proper objects of vision constitute an universal language of the Author of nature.” For typical humans, this language of vision comes naturally. Berkeley identifies two sorts of objects of vision: primary (light (...)
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  17. Walter E. Creery (1972). Berkeley's Argument for a Divine Visual Language. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (4):212 - 222.
  18. Phillip D. Cummins (1987). On the Status of Visuals in Berkeley's 'New Theory of Vision'. In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
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  19. Norman Daniels (1972). Thomas Reid's Discovery of a Non-Euclidean Geometry. Philosophy of Science 39 (2):219-234.
    Independently of any eighteenth century work on the geometry of parallels, Thomas Reid discovered the non-euclidean "geometry of visibles" in 1764. Reid's construction uses an idealized eye, incapable of making distance discriminations, to specify operationally a two dimensional visible space and a set of objects, the visibles. Reid offers sample theorems for his doubly elliptical geometry and proposes a natural model, the surface of the sphere. His construction draws on eighteenth century theory of vision for some of its technical features (...)
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  20. Katherine Dunlop (2011). The Role of Visual Language in Berkeley's Account of Generality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (3):525-559.
  21. Lorne Falkenstein (1994). Intuition and Construction in Berkeley's Account of Visual Space. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):63-84.
  22. Daniel E. Flage (2011). Analysis in Berkeley's Theory of Vision. In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars.
    In Section 38 of the Theory of Vision Vindicated, George Berkeley claims that he had used the method of analysis throughout the Theory of Vision. What does that mean? I first show that "analysis" denoted a fairly well-defined method in the early modern period: it was regularly described as a method of discovery. Then I show that the discussion of distance perception in the Theory of Vision exemplifies the method of analysis and may be seen as a modification of a (...)
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  23. Daniel E. Flage (2009). Berkeley's Contingent Necessities. Philosophia 37 (3):361-372.
    The paper provides an account of necessary truths in Berkeley based upon his divine language model. If the thesis of the paper is correct, not all Berkeleian necessary truths can be known a priori.
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  24. E. J. Furlong (1963). Berkeley and the 'Knot About Inverted Images'. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):306 – 316.
  25. Nelson Goodman (1962). D. M. Armstrong's "Berkeley's Theory of Vision: A Critical Examination of Bishop Berkeley's Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (2):284.
  26. Rick Grush (2007). Berkeley and the Spatiality of Vision. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):413-442.
    : Berkeley's Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision presents a theory of various aspects of the spatial content of visual experience that attempts to undercut not only the optico-geometric accounts of e.g., Descartes and Malebranche, but also elements of the empiricist account of Locke. My task in this paper is to shed light on some features of Berkeley's account that have not been adequately appreciated. After rehearsing a more detailed Lockean critique of the notion that depth is a proper (...)
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  27. Basileios Kroustallis (2004). Berkeley and the Moon Illusion. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (2):151 - 166.
  28. David M. Levy (1993). "Magic Buffalo" and Berkeley's Theory of Vision. Hume Studies 19 (1):223-226.
  29. Lawrence A. Mirarchi (1982). Dynamical Implications of Berkeley's Doctrine of Heterogeneity: A Note on the Language Model of Nature. In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  30. David Morris (1997). Optical Idealism and the Languages of Depth in Descartes and Berkeley. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):363-392.
  31. Robert Muehlmann (2008). Strong and Weak Heterogeneity in Berkeley's New Theory of Vision. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
  32. George Pitcher (ed.) (1842/1988). Berkeley on Vision: A Nineteenth-Century Debate. Garland Pub..
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