Related categories
Siblings:
108 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 108
  1. P. Acot (2002). Pierre-Henri Gouyon, Les Harmonies de la Nature a l'Epreuve de la Biologie, Evolution Et Biodiversite. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (3/4):542-542.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. George Amato & Rob DeSalle (2012). Assessing Biodiversity Funding During the Sixth Extinction. Bioessays 34 (8):658-660.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Christine Angelini, Andrew H. Altieri, Brian R. Silliman & Mark D. Bertness (2011). Interactions Among Foundation Species and Their Consequences for Community Organization, Biodiversity, and Conservation. BioScience 61 (10):782-789.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robin Attfield (2009). Reviews What is Biodiversity by James Maclaurin and Kim Sterelny University of Chicago Press, 2008. £31/£12.50. Philosophy 84 (4):605-609.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Francisco J. Ayala (2000). Evolution of Biological Diversity. Bioessays 22 (7):681-682.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Nathaniel F. Barrett (2011). The Promise and Peril of Ecological Restoration: Why Ritual Can Make a Difference 1. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (2):139 - 155.
    Writing in 1992, biologist E. O. Wilson prophesied, "Here is the means to end the great extinction spasm. The next century will, I believe, be the era of restoration in ecology." 2 This statement has become the rallying cry for advocates of ecological restoration, an emerging international environmental movement focused on the renewal of damaged or destroyed ecosystems. 3 The benefits promised by ecological restoration are manifold. In addition to its primary ecological goals of replenished biodiversity and improved ecosystem functioning, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard Blaustein (2013). Urban Biodiversity Gains New Converts. BioScience 63 (2):72-77.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Joachim Boldt (2013). Do We Have A Moral Obligation to Synthesize Organisms to Increase Biodiversity? On Kinship, Awe, and the Value of Life's Diversity. Bioethics 27 (8):411-418.
    Synthetic biology can be understood as expanding the abilities and aspirations of genetic engineering. Nonetheless, whereas genetic engineering has been subject to criticism due to its endangering biodiversity, synthetic biology may actually appear to prove advantageous for biodiversity. After all, one might claim, synthesizing novel forms of life increases the numbers of species present in nature and thus ought to be ethically recommended. Two perspectives on how to spell out the conception of intrinsic value of biodiversity are examined in order (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Broder Breckling & Hauke Reuter (2004). Analysing Biodiversity: The Necessity of Interdisciplinary Trends in the Development of Ecological Theory. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):83-105.
    Technological advancement has an ambivalent character concerning the impact on biodiversity. It accounts for major detrimental environmental impacts and aggravates threads to biodiversity. On the other hand, from an application perspective of environmental science, there are technical advancements, which increase the potential of analysis, detection and monitoring of environmental changes and open a wider spectrum of sustainable use strategies.The concept of biodiversity emerged in the last two decades as a political issue to protect the structural and functional basis of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. H. Sterling Burnett (1998). The Idea of Biodiversity: Philosophies of Paradise. Environmental Ethics 20 (2):203-206.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jorge M. Cabrera (2009). The Role of Inbio in the Use of Biodiversity for Sustainable Development : Forming Bioprospecting Partnership. In Evanson C. Kamau & Gerd Winter (eds.), Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge, and the Law Solutions for Access and Benefit Sharing. Earthscan.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Philip J. Cafaro, Richard B. Primack & Robert L. Zimdahl (2006). The Fat of the Land: Linking American Food Overconsumption, Obesity, and Biodiversity Loss. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):541-561.
    Americans’ excessive consumption of food harms their health and quality of life and also causes direct and indirect environmental degradation, through habitat loss and increased pollution from agricultural fertilizers and pesticides. We show here that reducing food consumption (and eating less meat) could improve Americans’ health and well-being while facilitating environmental benefits ranging from establishing new national parks and protected areas to allowing more earth-friendly farming and ranching techniques. We conclude by considering various public policy initiatives to lower per capita (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Julio A. Camargo (2008). Revisiting the Relation Between Species Diversity and Information Theory. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (4).
    The Shannon information function (H) has been extensively used in ecology as a statistic of species diversity. Yet, the use of Shannon diversity index has also been criticized, mainly because of its ambiguous ecological interpretation and because of its relatively great sensitivity to the relative abundances of species in the community. In my opinion, the major shortcoming of the traditional perspective (on the possible relation of species diversity with information theory) is that species need for an external receiver (the scientist (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alan Carter (2010). Biodiversity and All That Jazz. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (1):58-75.
    This article considers several of the most famous arguments for our being under a moral obligation to preserve species, and finds them all wanting. The most promising argument for preserving all varieties of species might seem to be an aesthetic one. Unfortunately, the suggestion that the moral basis for the preservation of species should be construed as similar to the moral basis for the preservation of a work of art seems to presume (what are now widely regarded as) erroneous conceptualizations (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Joseph A. Cook (2013). A Splendid Southern Synthesis. BioScience 63 (4):304-305.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Martin Dallimer, Katherine N. Irvine, Andrew Mj Skinner, Zoe G. Davies, James R. Rouquette, Lorraine L. Maltby, Philip H. Warren, Paul R. Armsworth & Kevin J. Gaston (2012). Biodiversity and the Feel-Good Factor: Understanding Associations Between Self-Reported Human Well-Being and Species Richness. BioScience 62 (1):47-55.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Kevin deLaplante (2007). Review of Sahotra Sarkar, Biodiversity and Environmental Philosophy: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (6).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ana Delgado (2008). Opening Up for Participation in Agro-Biodiversity Conservation: The Expert-Lay Interplay in a Brazilian Social Movement. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):559-577.
    In science and environmental studies, there is a general concern for the democratization of the expert-lay interplay. However, the democratization of expertise does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. If citizens do not take the sustainable choice, what should experts and decision makers do? Should the expert-lay interplay be dissolved? In thinking about how to shape the expert-lay interplay in a better way in agro-biodiversity conservation, I take the case of the MST (Movimento Sem Terra/Landless People’s Movement), possibly the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Delali B. K. Dovie (2003). Detaining Livelihoods and Disputing Biodiversity: Whose Dilemma? Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (1):27 – 41.
    The decision-making process of conserving biodiversity within the confines of sustainable livelihoods and development is examined. It is one of the greatest dilemmas facing the conservation community because of the multifaceted nature of activities involved. The case of the conservation of coastal wetlands in Ghana (from 1993 to 1999) is utilised in developing a 'community conservation interface' (CCI) model for the active participation of local communities. The ethical basis of the model is to promote accountability, transparency and responsibility throughout a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. J. Emmett Duffy, Linda A. Amaral-Zettler, Daphne G. Fautin, Gustav Paulay, Tatiana A. Rynearson, Heidi M. Sosik & John J. Stachowicz (2013). Envisioning a Marine Biodiversity Observation Network. BioScience 63 (5):350-361.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Paul T. Durbin (2003). Activist Philosophy of Technology and the Preservation of Biodiversity. Techne 6 (3):141-147.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Claus Emmeche (2001). Bioinvasion, Globalization, and the Contingency of Cultural and Biological Diversity. Sign Systems Studies 29 (1):237-261.
    The increasing problem of bioinvasion (the mixing up of natural species characterising the planet's local ecosystems due to globalisation) is investigated as an example of an ecosemiotic problematic. One concern is the scarcity of scientific knowledge about long term ecological and evolutionary consequences of invading species. It is argued that a natural science conception of the ecology of bioinvasion should be supplemented with an ecosemiotic understanding of the significance of these problems in relation to human culture, the question of cultural (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Johannes M. M. Engels, Hannes Dempewolf & Victoria Henson-Apollonio (2011). Ethical Considerations in Agro-Biodiversity Research, Collecting, and Use. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (2):107-126.
    Humans have always played a crucial role in the evolutionary dynamics of agricultural biodiversity and thus there is a strong relationship between these resources and human cultures. These agricultural resources have long been treated as a global public good, and constitute the livelihoods of millions of predominantly poor people. At the same time, agricultural biodiversity is under serious threat in many parts of the world despite extensive conservation efforts. Ethical considerations regarding the collecting, research, and use of agricultural biodiversity are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Uta Eser (2009). What Is Biodiversity? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (3):330-334.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Richard Foltz (2001). Darrell Addison Posey (Ed), Cultural and Spiritual Values of Biodiversity. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):94-96.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Kathryn Paxton George (1988). Biodiversity and Biotechnology. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (3):175-192.
    The maintenance of biodiversity is urged from many quarters and on grounds ranging from aesthetic considerations to its usefulness, particularly for biotechnology. But regardless of the grounds for preserving biodiversity, writers are generally in agreement that it should be preserved. But, in examining the various references biodiversity, such as species diversity, genetic diversity, and habitat diversity, it is apparent that we cannot aim to preserve biodiversityas such, since there are a number of conflicts in any such undertaking. In preserving one (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. M. T. Ghiselin (2010). A Tendency to Diversity. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (3):389-395.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Root Gorelick (2008). Species Richness and the Analytic Geometry of Latitudinal and Altitudinal Gradients. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (3).
    Extensive empirical work has shown that species richness decreases roughly exponentially or quadratically with latitude. What appears to be a latitudinal gradient in fact may simply be a negative correlation of latitude with area at that latitude, due to convergence of lines of meridian at the poles. There is simply less area at high latitudes, which means fewer niches and fewer opportunities for speciation, hence diminished biodiversity at high latitudes. Similarly, analytic geometry of a cone shows that species number (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Christoph Görg (2004). The Construction of Societal Relationships with Nature. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):22-36.
    The term biodiversity is constituted as an object of scientific investigations through complex social and, in particular, socio-economic processes. Taking all these processes together we can speak of the global regulation of biodiversity. Conversely, analysing this social construction of nature is at risk of ignoring the material properties of biodiversity. To grasp both aspects, the social construction of biodiversity as well as the elements non-identical to this social construction, the term “societal relationships with nature” from the so called “Frankfurt School (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John Grim (2007). Econatures : Science, Faith, Philosophy. Cooking the Truth : Faith, Science, the Market, and Global Warming / Laurel Kearns ; Ecospirituality and the Blurred Boundaries of Humans, Animals, and Machines / Glen A. Mazis ; Getting Over "Nature" : Modern Bifurcations, Postmodern Possibilities / Barbara Muraca ;Toward an Ethics of Biodiversity : Science and Theology in Environmentalist Dialogue / Kevin J. O'Brien ; Indigenous Knowing and Responsible Life in the World. [REVIEW] In Laurel Kearns & Catherine Keller (eds.), Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. Fordham University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. William Grove-Fanning (2010). Biodiversity Loss, the Motivational Gap, and the Failure of Conservation Education. Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):119-130.
    While the precipitous decline of biodiversity threatens life-sustaining processes and vast segments of the human population, concern about its loss remains extremely shallow. Nearly all motivational campaigns falsely assume that upon appreciating the relevant information, people will be sufficiently motivated to do something. But rational argumentation is doomed to fail, for there exists a motivational gap between a comprehension of the crisis and action taken based upon such knowledge. The origin of the gap lies neither in the quantity and quality (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Mathias Gutmann & Kathrin Prieß (2004). Biodiversity. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):1-2.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Chris Hamilton (2006). Biodiversity, Biopiracy and Benefits: What Allegations of Biopiracy Tell Us About Intellectual Property. Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):158–173.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. James Hanken (2013). Biodiversity Online: Toward a Network Integrated Biocollections Alliance. BioScience 63 (10):789-790.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Rob Hengeveld (2002). Macarthur, R.H. And E.O. Wilson (1967, Reprinted 2001). The Theory of Island Biogeography. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (2).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. David Heyd (2010). Cultural Diversity and Biodiversity: A Tempting Analogy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):159-179.
  37. Thomas Heyd (2002). Biodiversity and Democracy: Rethinking Society and Nature. Environmental Ethics 24 (2):217-218.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Korinna Horta (2000). Rainforest : Biodiversity Conservation and the Political Economy of International Financial Institutions. In Philip Anthony Stott & Sian Sullivan (eds.), Political Ecology: Science, Myth and Power. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Xiaolei Huang, Bradford A. Hawkins & Gexia Qiao (2013). Biodiversity Data Sharing: Will Peer-Reviewed Data Papers Work? BioScience 63 (1):5-6.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Eugene S. Hunn (1998). Atran's Biodiversity Parser: Doubts About Hierarchy and Autonomy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):576-577.
    Atran argues that an autonomous ethnobiological information-processing module exists. This module imputes a “deep causal essence” to folk-biological taxa and uses a hierarchy of taxonomic ranks. I argue that Atran's own data suggest that rank is not an essential feature of the ethnobiological module, and that ethnobiological causal essences may be generalized to other domains and vice versa, limiting its autonomy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Debra Javeline, Jessica J. Hellmann, Rodrigo Castro Cornejo & Gregory Shufeldt (2013). Expert Opinion on Climate Change and Threats to Biodiversity. BioScience 63 (8):666-673.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. James Justus, Effectiveness of Environmental Surrogates for the Selection of Conservation Area Networks.
    ebec and Queensland, we applied four methods to assess the extent to which environmental surrogates can represent biodiversity components: (1) surrogacy graphs; (2) marginal representation plots; (3) Hamming distance function; and (4) Syrjala statistical test for spatial congruence. For Qu´ebec we used 719 faunal and floral species as biodiversity components, and for Queensland we used 2348 plant species. We used four climatic parameter types (annual mean temperature, minimum temperature during the coldest quarter, maximum temperature during the hottest quarter, and annual (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Ian King (2009). The Need for the Incorporation of Phylogeny in the Measurement of Biological Diversity, with Special Reference to Ecosystem Functioning Research. Bioessays 31 (1):107-116.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Gary S. Kleppel (2013). Biodiversity in Agriculture: Domestication, Evolution, and Sustainability. BioScience 63 (3):228-229.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jerzy Kolasa & Eugeniusz Biesiadka (1984). Diversity Concept in Ecology. Acta Biotheoretica 33 (3).
    Hierarchy of systems organization is used as a framework in advancing methodological guidelines for posing correct questions related to ecological diversity.Diversity if defined in general terms as a property of a set of elements dependent on and determines: by the epistemological perspective. Ontological diversity, because it is indefinite, is regarded as unmeasurable.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Anna Lawrence (2006). 'No Personal Motive?' Volunteers, Biodiversity, and the False Dichotomies of Participation. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (3):279 – 298.
    Analyses of participation usually assume a dichotomy between 'instrumental' and 'transformative' approaches. However, this study of voluntary biological monitoring experiences and outcomes finds that they cannot be fitted into such a dichotomy. They can enhance the information base for environmental management; change participants through education about scientific practice and ecological change; lead to changes in life direction or group organisation; and influence decision-makers. Personal transformation can take place within a conventionally top-down context. Conversely, grassroots data collection can shore up the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1999). Agriculture and Biodiversity: Finding Our Place in This World. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (4):365-379.
    Agriculture has been recently viewed as the primary destructive force of biodiversity, but the places that produce our food and fiber may also hold the key to saving the richness of life on earth. This argument is based on three fundamental positions. First, it is argued that to value and thereby preserve and restore biodiversity we must begin by employing anthropocentric ethics. While changing our understanding of intrinsic values (i.e., the unconditional values of biodiversity as a state and process in-and-of-itself, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. James Maclaurin & Kim Sterelny (2008). What is Biodiversity? University of Chicago Press.
    What Is Biodiversity? is a theoretical and conceptual exploration of the biological world and how diversity is valued. Maclaurin and Sterelny explore not only the origins of the concept of biodiversity, but also how that concept has been shaped by ecology and more recently by conservation biology. They explain the different types of biodiversity important in evolutionary theory, developmental biology, ecology, morphology and taxonomy and conclude that biological heritage is rich in not just one biodiversity but many. Maclaurin and Sterelny (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Christophe Malaterre (2013). Microbial Diversity and the “Lower-Limit” Problem of Biodiversity. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):219-239.
    Science is now studying biodiversity on a massive scale. These studies are occurring not just at the scale of larger plants and animals, but also at the scale of minute entities such as bacteria and viruses. This expansion has led to the development of a specific sub-field of “microbial diversity”. In this paper, I investigate how microbial diversity faces two of the classical issues encountered by the concept of “biodiversity”: the issues of defining the units of biodiversity and of choosing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. C. Manté, J. Claudet & C. Rebzani-Zahaf (2003). Fairly Processing Rare and Common Species in Multivariate Analysis of Ecological Series. Application to Macrobenthic Communities From Algiers Harbour. Acta Biotheoretica 51 (4).
    Systematic sampling of communities gives rise to large contingency tables summing up possible changes in the assemblages' structure. Such tables are generally analysed by multivariate statistical methods, which are ill-suited for simultaneously analysing rare and common species (Field et al., 1982). In order to separately process species belonging to either of these categories, we propose a statistical method to select common species in a sequence of ecological surveys. It is based on a precise definition of rarity, and depends on a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 108