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  1. Lonnie W. Aarssen (2013). Valuation Branding for Bioscience Research in the Twenty-First Century. Bioscience 63 (6).
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  2. Shelley A. Adamo (2013). Attrition of Women in the Biological Sciences: Workload, Motherhood, and Other Explanations Revisited. Bioscience 63 (1):43-48.
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  3. Joachim Allgaier, Sharon Dunwoody, Dominique Brossard, Yin-Yueh Lo & Hans Peter Peters (2013). Journalism and Social Media as Means of Observing the Contexts of Science. Bioscience 63 (4):284-287.
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  4. Joachim Allgaier, Sharon Dunwoody, Dominique Brossard, Yin-Yueh Lo & Hans Peter Peters (2013). Journalism and Social Media as Means of Observing the Contexts of Science. Bioscience 63 (4):284-287..
    The transformation of today’s mass media system leads to uncertainty about communication behaviors concerning scientific issues. So far, few researchers have investigated this issue among scientists. We conducted a survey of neuroscientists in Germany and the United States in which we asked them about their own information-seeking behaviors and their assessment of the influence of various types of “old” and “new” media on public opinion and political decisionmaking. Our findings suggest that neuroscientists continue to use traditional journalistic media more often (...)
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  5. James Mark Baldwin (1909/1980). Darwin and the Humanities. Ams Press.
  6. Guido Barbujani & Massimo Pigliucci (2013). Human Races. Current Biology 23:185-187.
    What is a race? Ernst Mayr (1904–2005) distinguishes between species in which biological change is continuous in space, and species in which groups of populations with different character combinations are separated by borders. In the latter species, the entities separated by borders are geographic races or subspecies. Many anthropology textbooks describe human races as discrete (or nearly discrete) clusters of individuals, geographically localized, each of which shares a set of ancestors, and hence can be distinguished from other races by their (...)
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  7. Andrew B. Barron, Malin Ah‐King & Marie E. Herberstein (2011). Plenty of Sex, but No Sexuality in Biology Undergraduate Curricula. Bioessays 33 (12):899-902.
    Research over the last decades has stimulated a paradigm shift in biology from assuming fixed and dichotomous male and female sexual strategies to an appreciation of significant variation in sex and sexual behaviour both within and between species. This has resulted in the development of a broader biological understanding of sexual strategies, sexuality and variation in sexual behaviour. However, current introductory biological textbooks have not yet incorporated these new research findings. Our analysis of the content of current biology texts suggests (...)
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  8. Timothy M. Beardsley (2013). How to Win Friends and Influence. Bioscience 63 (8).
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  9. Timothy M. Beardsley (2013). Talk About Biology-Online. Bioscience 63 (4):239.
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  10. Tamsin L. Braisher, Matthew R. E. Symonds & Neil J. Gemmell (2005). Publication Success in Nature and Science is Not Gender Dependent. Bioessays 27 (8):858-859.
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  11. Glenn Branch (2013). Defending Science Education: Climate as a Second Front for Biologists. Bioscience 63 (9).
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  12. Geoffrey Brennan (2011). Keeping Company with Seabright. Biological Theory 6 (2):106-112.
    -/- According to Paul Seabright, “the unplanned but sophisticated coordination of modern economies is a remarkable fact that needs an explanation.” In this paper, I explore what is remarkable about modern economies and investigate what Seabright identifies as the aspect “that needs an explanation.” Essentially, Seabright is interested in the fact that modern economies require a great deal in the way of trustworthy behavior (and trust) in order to function well—and these trust relations must operate specifically among “strangers”! The puzzle (...)
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  13. Grzegorz Bugajak (2011). Fears of Science. Nature and Human Actions. In Adam Świeżyński (ed.), Knowledge and Values, Wyd. UKSW, Warszawa. 157–170.
    The paper points to quite a surprising change of the attitude among general public towards science and scientific progress that seems to have happened at the turn of the 20th century, and, to an extent, stays on: from holding scientific enterprise in high esteem to treating scientists and fortune˗tellers on a par, from hopes that science will eventually resolve our problems, both theoretical and practical, to anxiety and fear of what scientific experiments can bring about in nature and human life. (...)
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  14. Will D. Carpenter (1985). Science and Society: The Regulation of Biotechnology. Bioessays 2 (6):281-281.
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  15. Julie Palakovich Carr (2013). Researchers Take on a New Role: Advocate for Profession, Science. Bioscience 63 (1):12.
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  16. Erwin Chargaff (1985). Science and Society: Frozen Delight. Bioessays 2 (2):84-86.
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  17. Aubrey de Grey (2003). Fear of Misrepresentation Cannot Justify Silence About Foreseeable Life-Extension Biotechnology. Bioessays 25 (1):94-95.
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  18. Brett Edwards (2013). Lively Capital: Biotechnologies, Ethics, and Governance in Global Markets. Bioscience 63 (3):230-231.
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  19. Lars Ernster (1984). The Scientific Unions. This is ICSU. Bioessays 1 (2):85-86.
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  20. G. H. Fairtlough (1984). Biotechnology: The OTA Report: A U.K. Perspective. Bioessays 1 (2):81-82.
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  21. Christian Feichtinger (2011). The Darwinian Distinction or the Price for Biologism? The Image of Charles Darwin as Natural Scientific Hero and Saint. Disputatio Philosophica 12 (1):67-75.
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  22. Bernard Feltz (2009). Darwin entre science et société. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 107 (3):385-386.
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  23. Theodore Friedmann (1985). Science and Society: Scientific and Policy Progress Toward Gene Therapy. Bioessays 3 (1):40-41.
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  24. Kathryn Paxton George (1992). Moral and Nonmoral Innate Constraints. Biology and Philosophy 7 (2):189-202.
    Charles J. Lumsden and E.O. Wilson, in their writings together and individually, have proposed that human behaviors, whether moral or nonmoral, are governed by innate constraints (which they have termed epigenetic rules). I propose that if a genetic component of moral behavior is to be discovered, some sorting out of specifically moral from nonmoral innate constraints will be necessary. That some specifically moral innate constraits exist is evidenced by virtuous behaviors exhibited in nonhuman mammals, whose behavior is usually granted to (...)
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  25. Philipp Gerhardt (1986). The State of the Union in 1986. Bioessays 5 (4):147-148.
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  26. Matt Gers (2008). The Case for Memes. Biological Theory 3 (4):305-315.
    The significant theoretical objections that have been raised against memetics have not received adequate defense, even though there is ongoing empirical research in this field. In this paper I identify the key objections to memetics as a viable explanatory tool in studies of cultural evolution. I attempt to defuse these objections by arguing that they fail to show the absence of replication, high-fidelity copying, or lineages in the cultural domain. I further respond to meme critics by arguing that, despite competing (...)
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  27. S. W. Glover (1986). Third World Microbiology – Educational Needs. Bioessays 4 (2):51-52.
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  28. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Manolo Martínez (2013). Communication and Common Interest. PLOS Computational Biology 9 (11).
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  29. John C. Greene (1977). Darwin as a Social Evolutionist. Journal of the History of Biology 10 (1):1 - 27.
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  30. Zheng-Jun Guan, Markus Schmidt, Lei Pei, Wei Wei & Ke-Ping Ma (2013). Biosafety Considerations of Synthetic Biology in the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Competition. Bioscience 63 (1):25-34.
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  31. Donna Haraway (1988). Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective. Feminist Studies 14 (3):575-599.
  32. Garrett Hardin (1977). Sociobiology—Aesop with Teeth. Social Theory and Practice 4 (3):303-313.
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  33. Harmon R. Holcomb Iii & Douglas Allchin (1997). Sociobiology Sex and Science. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 19 (3):423.
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  34. I. I. I. Holcomb (1988). The Modern Synthesis and Lewontin's Critique of Sociobiology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 10 (2):315 - 341.
    Ernst Mayr (1980) provided an influential picture of the nature of the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis and of the debate and changes occurring prior to its completion. Mayr intended his account to be applicable to comparable cases. Sociobiology should be evaluated both as a comparable case, an attempt to produce a synthesis which undergoes development of the sort Mayr described, and as an extension of the Modern Synthesis itself. Examination of what the explanatory goals and development of the New Sociobiological Synthesis (...)
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  35. Wen‐Ru Hou, Ming Li & Deng‐Ke Niu (2011). Counting Citations in Texts Rather Than Reference Lists to Improve the Accuracy of Assessing Scientific Contribution. Bioessays 33 (10):724-727.
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  36. Sui Huang (2013). When Peers Are Not Peers and Don't Know It: The Dunning‐Kruger Effect and Self‐Fulfilling Prophecy in Peer‐Review. Bioessays 35 (5):414-416.
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  37. Ben Jeffares (2003). The Scope and Limits of Biological Explanations in Archaeology. Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington
    I show how archaeologists have two problems. The construction of scenarios accounting for the raw data of Archaeology, the material remains of the past, and the explanation of pre-history. Within Archaeology, there has been an ongoing debate about how to constrain speculation within both of these archaeological projects, and archaeologists have consistently looked to biological mechanisms for constraints. I demonstrate the problems of using biology, either as an analogy for cultural processes or through direct application of biological principles to material (...)
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  38. M. Jeuken (1983). Thinking About Mind and Matter From Biology. Acta Biotheoretica 32 (2).
    In biology, man is an object of research; therefore the question might be asked whether inspirations can go from biological data to the reflections on the mind-matter relation in man. The social aspect of man, as treated by sociobiology, is left out of consideration. The knowledge that man is mind, or has a mind, is no result of biological research. It is a datum from philosophy. The biologist, however, is living in a culture which knows about the mental character of (...)
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  39. Paul Johnson (2009). Paul Johnson Wonders Whether Darwin Would Have Put Atheist Slogans on Buses. The Chesterton Review 35 (1-2):284-288.
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  40. Neil Jumonville (2002). The Cultural Politics of the Sociobiology Debate. Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):569 - 593.
    The sociobiology debate, in the final quarter of the twentieth century, featured many of the same issues disputed in the culture war in the humanities during this same time period. This is evident from a study of the writings of Edward O. Wilson, the best known of the sociobiologists, and from an examination of both the minutes of the meetings of the Sociobiology Study Group (SSG) and the writings of Stephen Jay Gould, the SSG's most prominent member. Many critics of (...)
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  41. Jonathan Kaplan (2006). Misinformation, Misrepresentatino, and Misuse of Human Behavioral Genetics Research. Law and Contemporary Problems 69 (1-2):47-80.
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  42. Evelyn Fox Keller (1988). Demarcating Public From Private Values in Evolutionary Discourse. Journal of the History of Biology 21 (2):195 - 211.
    What I suggest we can see in this brief overview of the literature is an extensive interpenetration on both sides of these debates between scientific, political, and social values. Important shifts in political and social values were of course occurring over the same period, some of them in parallel with, and perhaps even contributing to, these transitions I have been speaking of in evolutionary discourse. The developments that I think of as at least suggestive of possible parallels include the progressive (...)
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  43. R. D. Keynes (1986). The ICSU/UNESCO International Biosciences Networks. Bioessays 4 (5):195-196.
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  44. William F. Laurance, D. Carolina Useche, Susan G. Laurance & Corey Ja Bradshaw (2013). Predicting Publication Success for Biologists. Bioscience 63 (10):817-823.
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  45. Sylvain Lavelle & Richard D'ari (1996). The New Scientific Spirit. Bioessays 18 (7):603-606.
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  46. Susanne Lettow (2008). The Cultural Embodiment of Biology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 44:53-61.
    Biology, established around 1800 as the “science of life,” has developed as not only a specific scientific discipline but it has also continually served as a kind of social knowledge. Biological knowledge supported the modern order of the sexes and the two-sex model that it was structured along, as well as modern racism and multiple forms of social inequality articulated by dichotomizing the normal and abnormal. However, the fledgling discipline of biology alone was not capable of developing the epistemological as (...)
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  47. M. Loi (2013). You Cannot Have Your Normal Functioning Cake and Eat It Too. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (12):748-751.
    Does biomedical enhancement challenge justice in health care? This paper argues that health care justice based on the concept of normal functioning is inadequate if enhancements are widespread. Two different interpretations of normal functioning are distinguished: the “species typical” vs. the “normal cooperator” account, showing that each version of the theory fails to account for certain egalitarian intuitions about help and assistance owed to people with health needs, where enhancements are widespread.
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  48. David Loye (2000). Darwin's Lost Theory and its Implications for the 21st Century. World Futures 55 (3):201-226.
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  49. David Ludwig (2013). Mediating Objects. Scientific and Public Functions of Models in Nineteenth-Century Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (2).
  50. Jane Maienschein (1994). Cutting Edges Cut Both Ways. Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):1-24.
    Emphasis on cutting edge science is common today. This paper shows that the concept, which selects some science at any given time as epistemically preferable and therefore better, actually gained acceptance by the turn of this century in biology and began immediately to have consequences for what biological research was done. The result, that some research is cut out while other work is privileged, can have pernicious results. Some of what is designated as not cutting edge may, in a different (...)
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