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Biomedical Ethics

Edited by L. Syd M Johnson (Michigan Technological University)
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  1. $authorfirstName $authorlastName (2007). Notice of Redundant Publication: Can the Difference in Medical Fees for Self and Donor Freeze-Thaw Embryo Transfer Cycle, Be in Fact a Cover-Up for the Sale of Donated Human Embryos? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):15.
    Please note that a commentary recently published in this journal (Heng; Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2007, 2:3) includes substantial duplication of Letters to the Editor published in Developing World Bioethics (Heng; Developing World Bioethics 2007, 7:49) and Human Fertility (Heng; Human Fertility 2007, 10: 129-130).
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  2. Vilhj?? Lmur ?? Rnason (2011). Nonconfrontational Rationality or Critical Reasoning. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):228.
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  3. J. G. M. Aartsen, P. V. Admiraal, Id Debeaufort, Tmg Vanberkestijn, Jbv Waalkes, E. Borsteilers, Wh Cense, Hs Cohen, Hm Dupuis & W. Everaerd (1989). Mercy, Murder, and Morality. Hastings Center Report 19 (6):47-48.
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  4. Sean Aas & Candice Delmas (forthcoming). The Ethics of Sexual Reorientation: What Should Clinicians and Researchers Do? Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2016-103562.
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  5. Emily Abdoler, Baruch da See WendlerBrody & Courtney S. Campbell (2010). By Author. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (4):391-393.
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  6. Julia Abelson, Mark E. Warren & Pierre‐Gerlier Forest (2012). The Future of Public Deliberation on Health Issues. Hastings Center Report 42 (2):27-29.
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  7. Virginia Abernethy (1983). The Consequences of “Terminal Rescue”. Hastings Center Report 13 (1):36-36.
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  8. Tineke A. Abma, Bert Molewijk & Guy A. M. Widdershoven (2009). Good Care in Ongoing Dialogue. Improving the Quality of Care Through Moral Deliberation and Responsive Evaluation. Health Care Analysis 17 (3):217-235.
    Recently, moral deliberation within care institutions is gaining more attention in medical ethics. Ongoing dialogues about ethical issues are considered as a vehicle for quality improvement of health care practices. The rise of ethical conversation methods can be understood against the broader development within medical ethics in which interaction and dialogue are seen as alternatives for both theoretical or individual reflection on ethical questions. In other disciplines, intersubjectivity is also seen as a way to handle practical problems, and methodologies have (...)
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  9. Tineke Abma, Anna Alomes, Gwen Anderson, Mila Aroskar, Kim Atkins, Joy Bickley-Asher, Helen Booth, Janie Butts, Miriam Cameron & Franco Carnevale (2008). Reviewers of Articles Received and Published in 2007–08. Nursing Ethics 15 (6):851.
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  10. Tineke Abma, Anne Arber, Arie van der Arend, Marianne Benedicta Arndt, Robert Arnott, Kim Atkins, Helen Aveyard, Susan Bailey, Joy Bickley-Asher & Pamela Bjorklund (2007). Reviewers of Articles Received and Published in 2006Á/07. Nursing Ethics 14 (6):849.
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  11. Tineke Abma & Guy Widdershoven (2014). Dialogical Ethics and Responsive Evaluation as a Framework for Patient Participation. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):27-29.
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  12. Jean Marie Abraham, Thomas DeLeire & Anne Beeson Royalty (2009). Access to Health Insurance at Small Establishments: What Can We Learn From Analyzing Other Fringe Benefits? Inquiry 46 (3):253-273.
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  13. María Antonia Acosta Valdés, Jorge Luis Quintana Torres, Maria Elena Macías Llanes & Dalyla Alonso Rodríguez (2006). Retos Tecnológicos Para Un Diagnóstico Actual Por El Laboratorio:: Estrés Oxidativo En Pediatría. Humanidades Médicas 6 (3):0-0.
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  14. G. P. Adams & M. Cook (1981). The Houseman and the Dying Patient. Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (3):142-145.
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  15. J. Adams (1992). Response to Huggins and Hayden. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (1):48-48.
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  16. Lee Adams & Ewan Armstrong (1996). Health Promotion—Penrith Paradoxes. From Analysis to Synthesis II—The Revenge. A Report of the Symposium. Health Care Analysis 4 (2):112-119.
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  17. Peter C. Adamson, Carmen Paradis & Martin L. Smith (2007). All for One, or One for All? Hastings Center Report 37 (4):13-15.
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  18. Gerald W. Adelmann (forthcoming). G-Tp of&, 000 or Me. Hastings Center Report.
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  19. Gerald W. Adelmann (1998). Reworking the Landscape, Chicago Style. Hastings Center Report 28 (6):6-11.
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  20. Gwen Adshead (2011). Tineke A. Abmais Professor of Client Participation in Elderly Care at the Department of Medical Humanities and the EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam. She has Published Extensively in the Fields of Program Evaluation and Qualitative Methods, Patient Participation, and (Nursing) Ethics. Elderly Care, Chronic, Care and Psychiatry Are Her Main Practice Fields. [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1).
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  21. K. Agar-Newman (1994). Comments on the ICN Position Statements Regarding Human Rights: Without Fear. Nursing Ethics 1 (4):242-245.
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  22. Joseph Agassi (1978). Liberal Forensic Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (3):226-241.
    The liberal approach to ethics quite naturally tends toward the classic individualistic theory of society, to reductionism or psychologism so-called, that is, to a reduction of all social action to individual action.2 For example, liberalism allows one to experiment with new medications on one's own body. By extension, liberalism allows one to experiment, it seems, on another person's body with new medication if one acts as the other person's agent, that is, if one has the other person's proper consent. We (...)
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  23. Joseph Agassi (1976). Causality and Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1 (4):301-317.
    The philosophers of science who viewed causality as a metaphysical headache were right. Yet when they concluded that it is of no scientific import and of less practical import, they were clearly in error. I say clearly because they thereby recommended that we replace cause by mere empirical correlation, which obviously will not do. Here is an obvious example which proves them in error without even touching upon the question of what science is.
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  24. C. Agathangelou (2005). Book Review: The New Politics of Medicine. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 12 (4):422-423.
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  25. C. Agathangelou (2004). Book Review: Ethical and Professional Issues in Nursing: Perspectives From Europe. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 11 (5):532-533.
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  26. C. Agathangelou (2004). Book Review: Nurses and Politics; the Impact of Power and Practice. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 11 (5):531-532.
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  27. C. Agathangelou (2002). Book Review: Power and Nursing Practice. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 9 (2):224-224.
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  28. C. Agathangelou (2002). Wilkinson G, Miers M Eds, Power and Nursing Practice. Nursing Ethics 9 (2):224-224.
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  29. C. Agathangelou (1999). Book Review: Ethics and Values in Health Care Management. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 6 (5):440-441.
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  30. C. Agathangelou (1999). Book Review: Who Owns Our Bodies? [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 6 (2):179-179.
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  31. C. Agathangelou (1998). Book Review: Health Promotion: Philosophy, Prejudice and Practice. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 5 (3):268-268.
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  32. C. Agathangelou (1998). Book Review: Moral Matters: Ethical Issues in Medicine and the Life Sciences. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 5 (3):266-267.
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  33. C. Agathangelou (1997). Book Review: The Need for Health Care. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 4 (3):257-258.
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  34. C. Agathangelou (1997). Shaeff R 1996: The Need for Health Care. London: Routledge. 228pp.£ 13.99 (Pb). Isbn 0 415 10112 3. Nursing Ethics 4 (3):257-258.
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  35. C. Agathangelou (1997). Shaeff R, The Need for Health Care. Nursing Ethics 4:257-257.
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  36. C. Agathangelou (1996). Book Reviews : Abraham J 1995: Science, Politics and the Pharmaceutical Industry; Controversy and Bias in Drug Regulation. London: UCL Press . 308pp. 12.95 . ISBN 1 85728 200 0. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 3 (2):181-182.
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  37. C. Agathangelou (1996). Book Reviews: Benner P Ed. 1994: Interpretive Phenomenology: Embodiment, Caring and Ethics in Health and Illness. London: Sage. 372 Pp. 42.50 . ISBN 0 8039 5722 X; 19.95 . ISBN 0 8039 5728 8. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 3 (3):277-278.
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  38. C. Agathangelou (1996). Book Reviews: Raya A 1995: Basike Noseleytike . Athens: A Raya. 294 Pp. GrDr 5000 . ISBN 960 90031 0 9. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 3 (4):369-369.
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  39. Evandro Agazzi (1989). Italy: Old Problems, New Books. Hastings Center Report 19 (4):27-29.
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  40. E. Agelii, B. Kennergren, E. Severinsson & H. Berthold (2000). Ethical Dimensions of Supervision: The Supervisors' Experiences. Nursing Ethics 7 (4):350-359.
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  41. E. Agélli, B. Kennergren, E. Severinsson & H. Berthold (2000). Ethical Dimensions of Supervision: The Supervisors' Experiences. Nursing Ethics 7 (4):350-359.
    Group-orientated supervision is provided continually to student nurses during their education. In the supervision process it is necessary to create a relationship between the supervisor and the supervisee that is based on an ethical, trusting relationship. The aim of the study was to investigate supervisors’ (n = 18) experiences of the ethical dimensions of ongoing group-orientated supervision. An additional aim was to describe the supervisors’ values by which they are guided in supervision. Data were collected by means of an open-ended (...)
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  42. A. Ager (1998). People-Centred Health Promotion. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):419-420.
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  43. N. Aghababaei (2014). Attitudes Towards Euthanasia in Iran: The Role of Altruism. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):173-176.
    Objective Altruism is arguably the quintessential moral trait, involving willingness to benefit others and unwillingness to harm them. In this study, I explored how altruism and other personality variables relate to acceptance of euthanasia. In addition, I investigated the role of culture in attitudes to subcategorical distinctions of euthanasia.Methods 190 Iranian students completed the Attitude Towards Euthanasia scale, the HEXACO Personality Inventory-Revised, and an interest in religion measure.Results Higher scores on altruism, Honesty–Humility, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness and religiousness were associated with viewing (...)
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  44. G. Agich (2005). What Kind of Doing is Ethics Consultation?,“. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (1).
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  45. G. J. Agich (forthcoming). Why Quality is so Rarely Addressed in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
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  46. G. J. Agich (2005). Until They Have Faces: The Ethics of Facial Allograft Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (12):707-709.
    The ethical discussion of facial allograft transplantation for severe facial deformity, popularly known as facial transplantation, has been one sided and sensationalistic. It is based on film and fiction rather than science and clinical experience. Based on our experience in developing the first IRB approved protocol for FAT, we critically discuss the problems with this discussion, which overlooks the plight of individuals with severe facial deformities. We discuss why FAT for facial deformity is ethically and surgically justified despite its negative (...)
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  47. G. J. Agich (1979). When Consent is Unbearable: An Alternative Case Analysis. Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (1):26-28.
    Dr Agich takes up a previous difficult case related by Dr Kottow in an earlier issue of the Journal. He analyses the three ethical problems as presented in the case and offers his own opinion of it as well as his own conclusions with regard to the medical ethical aspects of it. Unlike Dr Kottow, Dr Agich's reading of the case indicates that the application of the principle of informed consent does not rule out ethical decisions for the physician, but (...)
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  48. G. J. Agich & R. P. Jones (1985). The Logical Status of Brain Death Criteria. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (4):387-396.
    This article is an attempt to clarify a confusion in the brain death literature between logical sufficiency/necessity and natural sufficiency/necessity. We focus on arguments that draw conclusions regarding empirical matters of fact from conceptual or ontological definitions. Specifically, we critically analyze arguments by Tom Tomlinson and Michael B. Green and Daniel Wikler. which, respectively, confuse logical and natural sufficiency and logical and natural necessity. Our own conclusion is that it is especially important in discussing the brain death issue to observe (...)
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  49. G. J. Agich & B. J. Spielman (1997). Ethics Expert Testimony: Against the Skeptics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (4):381-403.
    There is great skepticism about the admittance of expert normative ethics testimony into evidence. However, a practical analysis of the way ethics testimony has been used in courts of law reveals that the skeptical position is itself based on assumptions that are controversial. We argue for an alternative way to understand such expert testimony. This alternative understanding is based on the practice of clinical ethics.
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  50. George G. J. Agich (1999). The Importance of Management for Understanding Managed Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (5):518 – 534.
    This paper argues that the concept of management is critically important for understanding managed care. A proper interpretation of management is needed before a positive account of the ethics of managed care can be constructed. The paper discusses three aspects of management: administrative, clinical, and resource management, and compares the central commitments of traditional medical practice with those of managed care for each of these aspects. In so doing, the distinctive conceptual features of the managed care paradigm are discussed. The (...)
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