This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
104 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 104
  1. Jaworska Agnieszka & Tannenbaum Julie (forthcoming). Who Has the Capacity to Participate as a Rearee in a Person-Rearing Relationship. Ethics.
    We discuss applications of our account of moral status grounded in person-rearing relationships: which individuals have higher moral status or not, and why? We cover three classes of cases: (1) cases involving incomplete realization of the capacity to care, including whether infants or fetuses have this incomplete capacity; (2) cases in which higher moral status rests in part on what is required for the being to flourish; (3) hypothetical cases in which cognitive enhancements could, e.g., help dogs achieve human-like cognitive (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Darrel W. Amundsen (1996). Medicine, Society, and Faith in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In Medicine, Society, and Faith in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds Darrel Amundsen explores the disputed boundaries of medicine and Christianity by focusing on the principle of the sanctity of human life, including the duty to treat or attempt to sustain the life of the ill. As he examines his themes and moves from text to context, Amundsen clarifies a number of Christian principles in relation to bioethical issues that are hotly debated today. In his examination of the moral stance (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Judith Andre (1998). A Larger Space for Moral Reflection. Ethical Currents (53):6-8.
    Margaret Urban Walker argues that hospital ethics committees should think of their task as "keeping moral space open." I develop her suggestion with analogies: Enlarge the windows (i.e., expand what counts as an ethical issue); add rooms and doors (i.e., choose particular issues to engage). Examples include confidentiality defined as information flow, and moral distress in the healthcare workplace.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. George J. Annas (2010). Worst Case Bioethics: Death, Disaster, and Public Health. Oxford University Press.
    American healthcare -- Bioterror and bioart -- State of emergency -- Licensed to torture -- Hunger strikes -- War -- Cancer -- Drug dealing -- Toxic tinkering -- Abortion -- Culture of death -- Patient safety -- Global health -- Statue of security -- Pandemic fear -- Bioidentifiers -- Genetic genocide.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jonny Anomaly (2014). What is an Epidemic? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):389-391.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jonny Anomaly (2011). Public Health and Public Goods. Public Health Ethics 4 (3):251-259.
    It has become increasingly difficult to distinguish public health from tangentially related fields like social work. I argue that we should reclaim the more traditional conception of public health as the provision of health-related public goods. The public goods account has the advantage of establishing a relatively clear and distinctive mission for public health. It also allows a consensus of people with different comprehensive moral and political commitments to endorse public health measures, even if they disagree about precisely why they (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jonny Anomaly (2010). Combating Resistance: The Case for a Global Antibiotics Treaty. Public Health Ethics 3 (1):13-22.
    The use of antibiotics by one person can profoundly affect the welfare of other people. I will argue that efforts to combat antimicrobial resistance generate a global collective action problem that only a well-designed international treaty can overcome. I begin by describing the problem of resistance and outlining some market-friendly policy tools that participants in a global treaty could use to control the problem. I then defend the claim that these policies can achieve their aim while protecting individual liberty and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Elvio Baccarini, Questions of Life and Death.
    The research started with a definition of the general ethical background to be applied in bioethical discussions, particularly regarding aspects of morality that have to be enforced by the community. Only those moral beliefs that can be accepted by consensus in a free discussion can be enforced. It follows that the basic principle of a well ordered society is the equality (and possible upwards extension) of the basic liberties. Therefore, whenever it is possible to respect the principle of autonomy in (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Rebecca Bamford & Mark D. Tschaepe (2011). Biophysical Models of Human Behavior: Is There a Place for Logic. American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (3):70-72.
    We present a two-pronged criticism of Ramos's argument. Our main contention is that the logic of the author’s argument is flawed. As we demonstrate, the author conflates probability with necessity, in addition to conflating free will having causal efficacy with the merely illusory conscious experience of free will; such conflations undermine the claim that individual free will should be both exhibited on a social scale and necessarily cause a particular organized pattern to emerge. In addition, we will show that the (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert Laurence Barry (2002). The Sanctity of Human Life and its Protection. University Press of America.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert Bass (2012). Lives in the Balance: Utilitarianism and Animal Research. In Jeremy Garrett (ed.), The Ethics of Animal Research: Exploring the Controversy. MIT Press.
    In the long history of moral theory, non-human animals—hereafter, just animals—have often been neglected entirely or have been relegated to some secondary status. Since its emergence in the early 19th century, utilitarianism has made a difference in that respect by focusing upon happiness or well-being (and their contraries) rather than upon the beings who suffer or enjoy. Inevitably, that has meant that human relations to and use of other animals have appeared in a different light. Some cases have seemed easy: (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Tom L. Beauchamp (1987). Medical Ethics in the Age of Technology. In Hans Mark & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.), Traditional Moral Values in the Age of Technology. Distributed by the University of Texas Press.
  13. Deryck Beyleveld (2001). Human Dignity in Bioethics and Biolaw. Oxford University Press.
    The concept of human dignity is increasingly invoked in bioethical debate and, indeed, in international instruments concerned with biotechnology and biomedicine. While some commentators consider appeals to human dignity to be little more than rhetoric and not worthy of serious consideration, the authors of this groundbreaking new study give such appeals distinct and defensible meaning through an application of the moral theory of Alan Gewirth.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Blumenthal-Barby (2013). “Choosing Wisely” to Reduce Low-Value Care: A Conceptual and Ethical Analysis. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (5):559-580.
    The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation has recently initiated a campaign called “Choosing Wisely,” which is aimed at reducing “low-value” care services. Lists of low-value care services are being developed and the ABIM Foundation is urging the American Medical Association and other organizations to get behind the lists, disseminate them, and implement them. Yet, there are many ethical questions that remain about the development, dissemination, and implementation of these low-value care lists. In this paper I argue for conceptual (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (2012). Seeking Better Health Care Outcomes: The Ethics of Using the “Nudge”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):1-10.
    Policymakers, employers, insurance companies, researchers, and health care providers have developed an increasing interest in using principles from behavioral economics and psychology to persuade people to change their health-related behaviors, lifestyles, and habits. In this article, we examine how principles from behavioral economics and psychology are being used to nudge people (the public, patients, or health care providers) toward particular decisions or behaviors related to health or health care, and we identify the ethically relevant dimensions that should be considered for (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Janet Borgerson (2005). Addressing the 'Global Basic Structure' in the Ethics of International Health Research Involving Human Subjects. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:235-249.
    The context of international health research involving human subjects, and this should appear obvious, is the human community. As such, basic questions of how human beings should be treated by other human beings, particularly in situations of unequal power – e.g., in the form of control, choice, or opportunity – lay at the foundations of related ethical discourse when ethics are discussed at all. I trace a narrative that follows upon a recent revision process of international guidelines for biomedical research (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Judith A. Boss (2001). Analyzing Moral Issues. Mcgraw Hill.
    Moral theory -- Abortion -- Genetic engineering, cloning, and stem cell research -- Euthanasia and assisted suicide -- The death penalty -- Drug and alcohol use -- Sexual intimacy and marriage -- Feminism, motherhood, and the workplace -- Freedom of speech -- Racial discrimination and global justice.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Frederic Bretzner, Frederic Gilbert, Françoise Baylis & Robert M. Brownstone (2011). Target Populations for First-In-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Stem Cell 8 (5):468-475.
    Geron recently announced that it had begun enrolling patients in the world's first-in-human clinical trial involving cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This trial raises important questions regarding the future of hESC-based therapies, especially in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We address some safety and efficacy concerns with this research, as well as the ethics of fair subject selection. We consider other populations that might be better for this research: chronic complete SCI patients for a safety trial, subacute (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Mindaugas Broga, Goran Mijaljica, Marcin Waligora, Aime Keis & Ana Marusic (2013). Publication Ethics in Biomedical Journals From Countries in Central and Eastern Europe. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-11.
    Publication ethics is an important aspect of both the research and publication enterprises. It is particularly important in the field of biomedical science because published data may directly affect human health. In this article, we examine publication ethics policies in biomedical journals published in Central and Eastern Europe. We were interested in possible differences between East European countries that are members of the European Union (Eastern EU) and South-East European countries (South-East Europe) that are not members of the European Union.The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Sylvia Burrow (2012). On The Cutting Edge: Ethical Responsiveness to Cesarean Section Rates. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (7):44-52.
    Cesarean delivery rates have been steadily increasing worldwide. In response, many countries have introduced target goals to reduce rates. But a focus on target goals fails to address practices embedded in standards of care that encourage, rather than discourage, cesarean sections. Obstetrical standards of care normalize use of technology, creating an imperative to use technology during labor and birth. A technological imperative is implicated in rising cesarean rates if physicians or patients fear refusing use of technology. Reproductive autonomy is at (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ruth F. Chadwick (ed.) (2007). The Bioethics Reader: Editors' Choice. Blackwell Pub..
    A collection celebrating some of the best essays from the Blackwell journals, Bioethics and Developing World Bioethics. Contributors include Helga Kuhse, Michael Selgelid and Baroness Mary Warnock, former Chair of the British Government’s Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilization and Embryology’s. Traces some of the most important concerns of the 1980s, such as the ethics of euthanasia, reproductive technologies, the allocation of scarce medical resources, surrogate motherhood, through to a range of new issues debated today, particularly in the field of (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jean-Claude Chevrolet & Bara Ricou (2009). Hospital Clinical Ethics Committees. The Geneva Experience - Switzerland. Diametros 22:21-38.
    Hospital ethics committees were created in the United States of America in the 1970s. Their aims were the education of the hospital personnel in the field of ethics, the development of policies and the publication of guidelines concerning ethical issues, as well as consultations and case reviews of hospitalized patients when an ethical concern was present. During the last thirty years, these committees disseminated, particularly in Western Europe. In this manuscript, we describe the benefit, but also some difficulties with these (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. James F. Childress (1982). Who Should Decide?: Paternalism in Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    "A very good book indeed: there is scarcely an issue anyone has thought to raise about the topic which Childress fails to treat with sensitivity and good judgement....Future discussions of paternalism in health care will have to come to terms with the contentions of this book, which must be reckoned the best existing treatment of its subject."--Ethics. "A clear, scholarly and balanced analysis....This is a book I can recommend to physicians, ethicists, students of both fields, and to those most affected--the (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ronald J. Christie (1986). Ethical Issues in Family Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    While ethicists have directed much attention to controversial biomedical issues--including euthanasia, abortion, and genetic engineering--they have largely ignored the less obvious, but more pervasive, everyday ethical problems faced by family physicians. Ethical Issues in Family Medicine addresses these problems, offering an ethics that reflects the distinctive features of family practice, and helping family physicians to appreciate the extent to which ethical issues influence their practice.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Steve Clarke (2013). The Neuroscience of Decision Making and Our Standards for Assessing Competence to Consent. Neuroethics 6 (1):189-196.
    Rapid advances in neuroscience may enable us to identify the neural correlates of ordinary decision making. Such knowledge opens up the possibility of acquiring highly accurate information about people’s competence to consent to medical procedures and to participate in medical research. Currently we are unable to determine competence to consent with accuracy and we make a number of unrealistic practical assumptions to deal with our ignorance. Here I argue that if we are able to detect competence to consent and if (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2002). On Cloning Human Beings. Bioethics 16 (3):246–265.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Ezio Di Nucci (2014). Contraception and Double Effect. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (7):42-43.
  28. Jocelyn Downie, Carolyn McLeod & Jacquelyn Shaw (2013). Moving Forward with a Clear Conscience: A Model Conscientious Objection Policy for Canadian Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons. Health Law Review 21 (3):28-32.
    A model policy for conscientious objection in medicine.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Christopher Dowrick & Lucy Frith (eds.) (1999). General Practice and Ethics: Uncertainty and Responsibility. Routledge.
    Explores the ethical issues faced by GPs in their everyday practice, addressing two central themes; the uncertainty of outcomes and effectiveness in general practice and the changing pattern of general practitioners' responsibilities.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Spyros Doxiadis (ed.) (1985). Ethical Issues in Preventive Medicine. Distributors for United States and Canada.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Carl Elliott (ed.) (2001). Slow Cures and Bad Philosophers: Essays on Wittgenstein, Medicine, and Bioethics. Duke University Press.
    "Carl Elliott always writes intriguing essays at the intersection between ethics, medicine, and general philosophy, so it is a real pleasure to have a new ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert M. Ellis (2011). A New Buddhist Ethics. Lulu.com.
    This book is a survey of practical moral issues applying the Middle Way (as developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity') as the basis of 'Buddhist' Ethics. No appeal is made to Buddhist traditions or scriptures, but instead the Middle Way is applied consistently as a universal philosophical and practical principle to suggest the direction of resolutions to moral debates. Practical ethics topics covered include sexual ethics, medical ethics, environmental ethics, animals, violence, the arts, scientific issues and political ethics.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Alexandre Erler (2012). One Man's Authenticity is Another Man's Betrayal: A Reply to Levy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (3):257-265.
    This article responds to Neil Levy's recent suggestion that: (1) the use of pharmaceutical enhancers can be understood as promoting our authenticity, no matter which of the two main contemporary conceptions of authenticity we adopt; and that (2) we do not need to decide between these two rival models (the ‘self-discovery’ and the ‘self-creation’ conception) in order to assess the common worry that enhancements will undermine our authenticity. Levy's core argument is based on a comparison between cases of people with (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Thomas Erren, Juliane Groß, David Shaw & Barbara Selle (2014). The Representation of Women as Authors, Reviewers, Editors-in-Chief, and Editorial Board Members at Six General Medical Journals in 2010 and 2011. JAMA Internal Medicine 174 (4):633.
    Although more women continue to enter the medical profession, disparities between the sexes in academic medicine persist. This “gender gap” has implications for academic advancement. In 2006, Jagsi and colleagues reported that, although the proportion of women among first and last authors in the United States had significantly increased since 1970, women still represented a minority of the authors of original research and guest editorials in six prominent medical journals.1 In a related 2008 study, Jagsi and colleagues found a substantial (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Roman Espejo (ed.) (2002). Biomedical Ethics. Greenhaven Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Michele Farisco (2013). The Ethical Pain. Neuroethics 6 (2):265-276.
    The intriguing issue of pain and suffering in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOCs), particularly in Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome/Vegetative State (UWS/VS) and Minimally Conscious State (MCS), is assessed from a theoretical point of view, through an overview of recent neuroscientific literature, in order to sketch an ethical analysis. In conclusion, from a legal and ethical point of view, formal guidelines and a situationist ethics are proposed in order to best manage the critical scientific uncertainty about pain and suffering in DOCs (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2004). Wessen Wille Geschehe? Fremdnützige Forschung an Nichteinwilligungsfähigen. Die Argumente in der Philosophischen Kritik. Zeitschrift Fur Philosophie Forschung 58 (3):397-427.
    This paper critically examines the predominant arguments that have been proposed either in favour or against non-benefit medical research with human subjects incapable of informed consent. It is argued that none of the arguments succeeds, while acknowledging that such research is necessary.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jessica Flanigan (2013). Refusal Rights, Law, and Medical Paternalism in Turkey. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):636-637.
    Dr Tolga Guven and Dr Gurkan Sert argue the Turkish legal principles do not give clear guidance about the permissibility of medical paternalism. They then argue that the best interpretation of these principles requires respect for patients’ rights. I agree that medical paternalism is wrong, but the truth of this claim does not depend on legal interpretation or medical culture. Further, the antipaternalist thesis of Guven and Sert may command much more extensive reforms than they acknowledge.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Isaac Franck & J. DAvid Bleich (eds.) (1980). Biomedical Ethics in Perspective of Jewish Teaching and Tradition: Proceedings of an Academic Conference, November 13, 1977. College of Jewish Studies of Greater Washington (D.C.).
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Benjamin Freedman (2000). The Roles and Responsibilities of the Ethics Consultant: A Retrospective Analysis of Cases. University Publishing.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.) (2002). Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies. Blackwell Publishers.
    This volume illustrates the central importance of diversity of human values throughout healthcare.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jeremy Garrett (ed.) (forthcoming). The Ethics of Animal Research: Exploring the Controversy. MIT Press.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Frederic Gilbert (2012). The Burden of Normality: From 'Chronically Ill' to 'Symptom Free'. New Ethical Challenges for Deep Brain Stimulation Postoperative Treatment. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (7):408-412.
    Although an invasive medical intervention, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been regarded as an efficient and safe treatment of Parkinson’s disease for the last 20 years. In terms of clinical ethics, it is worth asking whether the use of DBS may have unanticipated negative effects similar to those associated with other types of psychosurgery. Clinical studies of epileptic patients who have undergone an anterior temporal lobectomy have identified a range of side effects and complications in a number of domains: psychological, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Walter Glannon (2001). Contemporary Readings in Biomedical Ethics. Harcourt College Publishers.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. David E. Guinn (ed.) (2006). Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press.
    What role should religion play in a religiously pluralistic liberal society? Public bioethics unavoidably raises this question in a particularly insistent fashion. As the 20 papers in this collection demonstrate, the issues are complex and multifaceted. The authors address specific and highly contested issues as assisted suicide, stem cell research, cloning, reproductive health, and alternative medicine as well as more general questions such as who legitimately speaks for religion in public bioethics, what religion can add to our understanding of justice, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Tim Henning (2014). Retter-Kinder, Instrumentalisierung und Kants Zweckformel. Ethik in der Medizin 26 (3):195-209.
    Definition of the problem The creation and selection of children as tissue donors is ethically controversial. Critics often appeal to Kant’s Formula of Humanity, i.e. the requirement that people be treated not merely as means but as ends in themselves. As many defenders of the procedure point out, these appeals usually do not explain the sense of the requirement and hence remain obscure. Arguments This article proposes an interpretation of Kant’s principle, and it proposes that two different instrumental stances be (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Daniel Holbrook, Biomedical Ethics Spring 2007.
    Topic Read 01. Jan 09 Introduction/Pretest/Critical Thinking 02. Jan 11 Ethical Theory Homepage 03. Jan 16 More about Ethical Theory 04. Jan 18 Euthanasia CC-2 05. Jan 23 More about Euthanasia CC-4 06. Jan 25 Birth Defects CC-9 07. Jan 30 Euthanasia/Birth Defects Symposium 08. Feb 01 Animals as Research Subjects CC-10 09. Feb 06 More about Animals as Research Subjects 10. Feb 08 Humans as Research Subjects CC-11 11. Feb 13 Organ/Tissue Donation & Xenografts CC-13/14 12. Feb 15 Research (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Agnieszka Jaworska & Julie Tannenbaum (2014). Person-Rearing Relationships as a Key to Higher Moral Status. Ethics 124 (2):242-271.
    Why does a baby who is otherwise cognitively similar to an animal such as a dog nevertheless have a higher moral status? We explain the difference in moral status as follows: the baby can, while a dog cannot, participate as a rearee in what we call “person-rearing relationships,” which can transform metaphysically and evaluatively the baby’s activities. The capacity to engage in these transformed activities has the same type of value as the very capacities (i.e., intellectual or emotional sophistication) that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Walter G. Jeffko (2008). Contemporary Ethical Issues: A Personalist Perspective. Humanity Books.
    Person, reason, and value -- Moral value, intentionality, and community -- Suicide and the right to die -- Abortion, personhood, and community -- Euthanasia : a reinterpretation -- The death penalty and purposes of punishment -- Privacy, private property, and justice -- The personalist society, community, and justice -- The moral treatment of animals -- Affirmative action and justice -- Community and the environmental crisis.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. L. Syd M. Johnson (2013). Stable Value Sets, Psychological Well-Being, and the Disability Paradox: Ramifications for Assessing Decision Making Capacity. AJOB Neuroscience 4 (4):24-25.
    The phenomenon whereby severely disabled persons self-report a higher than expected level of subjective well-being is called the “disability paradox.” One explanation for the paradox among brain injury survivors is “response shift,” an adjustment of one’s values, expectations, and perspective in the aftermath of a life-altering, disabling injury. The high level of subjective well-being appears paradoxical when viewed from the perspective of the non-disabled, who presume that those with severe disabilities experience a quality of life so poor that it might (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 104