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  1. Richard J. Bonnie (2010). Should a Personality Disorder Qualify as a Mental Disease in Insanity Adjudication? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):760-763.
    The determinative issue in applying the insanity defense is whether the defendant experienced a legally relevant functional impairment at the time of the offense. Categorical exclusion of personality disorders from the definition of mental disease is clinically and morally arbitrary because it may lead to unfair conviction of a defendant with a personality disorder who actually experienced severe, legally relevant impairments at the time of the crime. There is no need to consider such a drastic approach in most states and (...)
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  2. Matthew R. Broome & Havi Carel (2009). The Ubiquity of Moods. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):267-271.
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  3. Amy L. Skinner (2010). Enhancing Pre-Service Students' Learning and Thinking About Bipolar Disorder Via Lecturer Descriptions of Living with Mental Illness. Inquiry 25 (1):29-38.
    Two lecture styles were examined to determine which was more effective for enhancing content learning in college students. The same experienced guest lecturer presented information about bipolar disorder (a combination of depression and mania) to college students in human service-related fields. Students in classes assigned to the control group received a standard, didactic lecture. In classes assigned to the experimental group, the presenter began the lecture by informing the students that she had bipolar disorder and enhanced the standard didactic lecture (...)
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  4. John Smythies (2011). The Neural Control of Mood: The Possible Role of the Adrenergic System in the Medulla. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):489-493.
  5. Marco Solinas (2010). Die Melancholie, der Geist des Kapitalismus und die Depression. Freie Assoziation 13 (4):79-99.
    The essay aims to analyse the gradual historical process of the partial overlap, replacement and expansion of the theoretical paradigm of depression with respect to that of melancholy. The first part is devoted to analysing some of the central features of the multivalent thematizations of melancholy drawn up during modernity, also with relation to the spirit of capitalism (in its Weberian acceptation). This is followed by an overview of the birth of the modern category of depression, and the process that (...)
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  6. Marco Solinas (2009). Sulle tracce della malinconia. Un approccio filosofico-sociale. Costruzioni Psicoanalitiche (17):83-102.
    The essay aims to analyse the gradual historical process of the partial overlap, replacement and expansion of the theoretical paradigm of depression with respect to that of melancholy. The first part is devoted to analysing some of the central features of the multivalent thematizations of melancholy drawn up during modernity, also with relation to the spirit of capitalism (in its Weberian acceptation). This is followed by an overview of the birth of the modern category of depression, and the process that (...)
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  7. Serife Tekin (forthcoming). Self-Insight in the Time of Mood Disorders: After the Diagnosis, Beyond the Treatment. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology.
    This paper explores the factors that contribute to the degree of a mood disorder patient’s self- insight, defined here as her understanding of the particular contingencies of her life that are responsive to her personal identity, interpersonal relationships, illness symptoms, and the relationship between these three necessary components of her lived experience. I consider three factors: (i) the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), (ii) the DSM culture, and (iii) the cognitive architecture of the self. I argue that the (...)
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