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  1. R. G. Abdulatipov (2007). Voli͡a K Smerti: Filosofii͡a Krizisa Globalʹnogo Cheloveka. Klassiks Stilʹ.
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  2. Sydney Alrutz (1897). On the Temperature-Senses. Mind 6 (23):445-448.
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  3. Adrian Alsmith (2012). What Reason Could There Be to Believe in Pre-Reflective Bodily Self-Consciousness. In Fabio Paglieri (ed.), Consciousness in interaction: The role of the natural and social environment in shaping consciousness. John Benjamins Press
  4. Durán Amavizca, Norma Delia, Jiménez Silva & María del Pilar (eds.) (2009). Cuerpo, Sujeto E Identidad. Plaza y Valdés.
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  5. Andreas Bähr (ed.) (2005). Grenzen der Aufklärung: Körperkonstruktionen Und Die Tötung des Körpers Im Übergang Zur Moderne. Wehrhahn.
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  6. Fiorella Battaglia (2012). The Embodied Self and the Feeling of Being Alive. In Joerg Fingerhut & Sabine Marienberg (eds.), Feelings of Being Alive / Gefühle des Lebendigseins. De Gruyter 201-222.
    This paper aims to render some aspects of the feeling of being alive more clearly comprehensible. My emphasis on the phenomenal quality of consciousness stems from the “embodied” approach to consciousness, according to which consciousness, since it is considered a phenomenon of life, includes both intentional and motivational aspects. In this view, its phenomenal quality is an inherent property of the embodied self, which relates both to the external world and to itself. The feeling of being alive is not neutral; (...)
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  7. Thomas W. Bestor (1976). Dualism and Bodily Movements. Inquiry 19 (1-4):1-26.
    Philosophers.all too often think that statements about human bodily movements are basic and unproblematic. It is argued here that just the opposite is the case: with human beings action descriptions are the basic ones and bodily movement descriptions are the problematic ones. They are problematic because they are the offspring of the Cartesian dualist's notion of a human body as something ?conceptually separable? from anything mental, a notion which in fact is wholly empty. This claim is supported by examining three (...)
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  8. Antonia Birnbaum (2008). To Exist is to Exit the Point. In Jean-Luc Nancy (ed.), Corpus. Fordham University Press
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  9. George Bondor (ed.) (2011). Sensuri Ale Corpului: Actele Celui de-Al 2-Lea Colocviu Al Centrului de Hermeneutică, Fenomologie Și Filosofie Practică, 28-29 Octombrie 2010, Universitatea "A.I. Cuza" Din Iași, Facultatea de Filosofie Și Științe Social-Politice, Iași, România. [REVIEW] Editura Universității "Alexandru Ioan Cuza".
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  10. Taylor Carman & Mark B. N. Hansen (eds.) (2004). The Cambridge Companion to Merleau-Ponty. Cambridge University Press.
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty was described by Paul Ricoeur as 'the greatest of the French phenomenologists'. The essays in this volume examine the full scope of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy, from his central and abiding concern with the nature of perception and the bodily constitution of intentionality to his reflections on science, nature, art, history, and politics. The authors explore the historical origins and context of his thought as well as its continuing relevance to contemporary work in phenomenology, philosophy of mind, cognitive science, biology, (...)
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  11. Dan Cavedon-Taylor (forthcoming). Touching Voids: On the Varieties of Absence Perception. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-12.
    Seeing one’s laptop to be missing, hearing silence and smelling fresh air; these are all examples of perceptual experiences of absences. In this paper I discuss an example of absence perception in the tactual sense modality, that of tactually perceiving a tooth to be absent in one’s mouth, following its extraction. Various features of the example challenge two recently-developed theories of absence perception: Farennikova’s memory-perception mismatch theory and Martin and Dockic’s meta-cognitive theory. I speculate that the mechanism underlying the experience (...)
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  12. David R. Cerbone (2000). Heidegger and Dasein's 'Bodily Nature': What is the Hidden Problematic? International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (2):209 – 230.
    In Being and Time, Heidegger explicitly defers any consideration of ourselves (Dasein) as embodied. I try to account for Heidegger's reluctance to talk about 'the body' in connection with his explication of Dasein, by arguing that doing so would be at odds with the kind of investigation his 'phenomenology of everydayness' is meant to be. That Heidegger omits discussion of the body in Being and Time might lead one to think of the human body in terms of the other categories (...)
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  13. Giovanna Colombetti (2011). Varieties of Pre-Reflective Self-Awareness: Foreground and Background Bodily Feelings in Emotion Experience. Inquiry 54 (3):293 - 313.
    How do we feel our body in emotion experience? In this paper I initially distinguish between foreground and background bodily feelings, and characterize them in some detail. Then I compare this distinction with the one between reflective and pre-reflective bodily self-awareness one finds in some recent philosophical phenomenological works, and conclude that both foreground and background bodily feelings can be understood as pre-reflective modes of bodily self-awareness that nevertheless differ in degree of self-presentation or self-intimation. Finally, I use the distinction (...)
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  14. Suzanne Cunningham (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments and an Abstract: Comments on "Merleau-Ponty and the Myth of Bodily Intentionality". Noûs 22 (1):49-50.
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  15. Sanneke de Haan & Thomas Fuchs (2010). The Ghost in the Machine: Disembodiment in Schizophrenia - Two Case Studies. Psychopathology 43 (5):327-333.
    The notion of embodiment is central to the phenomenological approach to schizophrenia. This paper argues that fundamental concepts for the understanding of schizophrenia have a bodily dimension. We present two single cases of first-onset schizophrenic patients and analyze the reports of their experiences. Problems such as loss of self, loss of common sense, and intentionality disorders reveal a disconnectedness that can be traced back to a detachment from the lived body. Hyperreflectivity and hyperautomaticity are used as coping mechanisms, but reflect (...)
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  16. Helena de Preester (2011). Technology and the Body: The (Im)Possibilities of Re-Embodiment. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 16 (2):119-137.
    This article argues for a more rigorous distinction between body extensions on the one hand and incorporation of non-bodily objects into the body on the other hand. Real re-embodiment would be a matter of taking things (most often technologies) into the body, i.e. of incorporation of non-bodily items into the body. This, however, is a difficult process often limited by a number of conditions of possibility that are absent in the case of ‘mere’ body extensions. Three categories are discussed: limb (...)
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  17. Frederique de Vignemont (2005). Body Mereology. In G. Knoblich, I. M. Thornton, M. Grosjean & M. Shiffrar (eds.), Human Body Perception From the Inside Out. Oxford University Press
    The body is made up of parts. This basic assumption is central in most neuroscientific studies of bodily sensation, body representation and motor action. Yet, the assumption has rarely been considered explicitly. We may indeed ask how the body is internally segmented and how body parts can be defined. That is, how can we sketch the mereology of the body? Here we distinguish between a somatosensory mereology and a motor mereology.
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  18. Gunnar Declerck & Olivier Gapenne (2009). Actuality and Possibility: On the Complementarity of Two Registers in the Bodily Constitution of Experience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):285-305.
    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of the concept of possibility , and not merely that of actuality , for an inquiry into the bodily constitution of experience. The paper will study how the possibilities of action that may (or may not) be available to the subject help to shape the meaning attributed to perceived objects and to the situation occupied by the subject within her environment. This view will be supported by reference to empirical evidence (...)
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  19. Marek Drwięga (2005). Ciało Człowieka: Studium Z Antropologii Filozoficznej. Księgarnia Akademicka.
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  20. Colleen Dunagan (2005). Dance, Knowledge, and Power. Topoi 24 (1):29-41.
    Susanne K. Langer contributed an exhaustive account of aesthetics, Feeling and Form, in which she articulated her schema of the virtual and wove together the aesthetic elements of music, visual arts, dance, and literature/theater. This analysis of her work centers on two key concepts within her philosophy: the virtual as the aesthetic effect of the work and the perception of the work through intuition. In this paper, I re-read Langers philosophy through a perspective built on intersections between phenomenology, pragmatism, and (...)
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  21. Phil Dwyer (2000). The Bodily Nature of Consciousness: Sartre and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind Kathleen Wider Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1997, X + 207 Pp., $39.95, $15.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 39 (01):186-.
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  22. Wilson Edattukaran (2010). Dialogue with the World: The Concept of Body According to Merleau-Ponty and Ramanuja. Sri Satguru Publications.
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  23. Eva-Maria Engelen (2012). Das Gefühl des Lebendigseins Als Einfache Form Phänomenalen Bewusstseins. Ein Aristotelischer Theorieansatz. In Joerg Fingerhut & Sabine Marienberg (eds.), Feelings of Being Alive / Gefühle des Lebendigseins. De Gruyter
    This paper works out which conceptual and theoretical preconditions have to be met, among others, in order for a living creature to be able to have a feeling of being alive beyond the mere capacity for sensation. For the emergence of such a feeling, which can be equated with a rudimentary phenomenal consciousness (1.), it is not enough for the organism to be alive (2. a.). Rather it has to be able to conceive its body as a unit and to (...)
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  24. Mikhail Epstein (2006). Filosofii͡a Tela. Izd-Vo "Aleteĭi͡a".
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  25. Rossella Fabbrichesi (2010). Corpo E Comunità. Cuem.
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  26. Joerg Fingerhut & Sabine Marienberg (2012). How It Feels to Be Alive: Moods, Background Orientations, and Existential Feelings. In Joerg Fingerhut & Sabine Marienberg (eds.), Feelings of Being Alive. De Gruyter
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  27. Thomas Fuchs (2012). The Feeling of Being Alive. Organic Foundations of Self-Awareness. In Joerg Fingerhut & Sabine Marienberg (eds.), Feelings of Being Alive / Gefühle des Lebendigseins. De Gruyter 149-165.
  28. Thomas Fuchs (2010). The Psychopathology of Hyperreflexivity. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (3):239-255.
    The structure of human embodiment is fundamentally characterized by a polarity or ambiguity between Leib and Körper, the subjective body and the objectified body, or between being-body and having-a-body. This ambiguity, emphasized, above all, by Helmuth Plessner and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, is also of crucial significance for psychopathology. Insofar as mental illnesses disturb or interrupt the unhindered conduct of one’s life, they also exacerbate the tension within embodiment that holds between being-body and having-a-body. In mental illnesses, there is a failure of (...)
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  29. Shaun Gallagher (2011). Somaesthetics and the Care of the Body. Metaphilosophy 42 (3):305-313.
    Abstract: This article poses a number of questions to Richard Shusterman concerning his concepts of somaesthetics and body consciousness in his book Body Consciousness: A Philosophy of Mindfulness and Somaesthetics. How do the concepts relate to the kind of forgetfulness of the body that can happen in expert performance? What is the nature of somatic reflection, and how is it different from pre-reflective awareness of the body? The article suggests that our immersed involvement and overt orientation toward things, and toward (...)
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  30. Shaun Gallagher (2001). Book Review. The Bodily Nature of Consciousness: Sartre and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind Kathleen Wider. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):577-582.
  31. Hongbing Ge (2005). Shen Ti Zheng Zhi. Shanghai San Lian Shu Dian.
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  32. Raymond W. Gibbs, Dinara A. Beitel, Michael Harrington & Paul E. Sanders (1994). Taking a Stand on the Meanings of Stand: Bodily Experience as Motivation for Polysemy. Journal of Semantics 11 (4):231-251.
    This paper reports four experiments designed to examine the role that recurring bodily experiences have in motivating people's understandings of different senses of the polysemous word stand. Different patterns of recurring bodily experiences, called image schemas, emerge throughout sensorimotor activity and from our perceptual understanding of actions and events in the real world. The present claim is that each use of stand is motivated by a complex pattern of different image schemas. Experiment 1 revealed five major image schemas that are (...)
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  33. James Giles (1991). Bodily Theory and Theory of the Body. Philosophy 66 (257):339 - 347.
    What is it about having a body that might dispose us to think it a plausible candidate for the basis of personal identity? The answer seems plain: the body is a physical object which, as long as it exists, is spatio-temporally continuous throughout the different moments of its existence. In consequence, myself of today can be said to be the same person as myself of twelve years ago so far as my body of today is spatio-temporally continuous with my body (...)
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  34. Paul Gyllenhammer (2006). Kathleen V. Wider: The Bodily Nature of Consciousness: Sartre and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (3-4):395-397.
  35. Gregor Hochstetter (2016). Attention in Bodily Awareness. Synthese 193 (12):3819-3842.
    The aim of this paper is to develop and defend an Attentional View of bodily awareness, on which attention is necessary for bodily awareness. The original formulation of the Attentional View is due to Marcel Kinsbourne. First, I will show that the Attentional View of bodily awareness as formulated by Kinsbourne is superior to other accounts in the literature for characterizing the relationship between attention and bodily awareness. Kinsbourne’s account is the only account in the literature so far which can (...)
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  36. Jakob Hohwy & Bryan Paton (2010). Explaining Away the Body: Experiences of Supernaturally Caused Touch and Touch on Non-Hand Objects Within the Rubber Hand Illusion. PLoS ONE 5 (2):e9416.
    In rubber hand illusions and full body illusions, touch sensations are projected to non-body objects such as rubber hands, dolls or virtual bodies. The robustness, limits and further perceptual consequences of such illusions are not yet fully explored or understood. A number of experiments are reported that test the limits of a variant of the rubber hand illusion. Methodology/Principal Findings -/- A variant of the rubber hand illusion is explored, in which the real and foreign hands are aligned in personal (...)
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  37. Nicholas P. Holmes (2009). Inverse Effectiveness, Multisensory Integration, and the Bodily Self: Some Statistical Considerations. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):762-765.
    A recent report in Consciousness and Cognition provided evidence from a study of the rubber hand illusion that supports the multisensory principle of inverse effectiveness . I describe two methods of assessing the principle of inverse effectiveness , and discuss how the post-hoc method is affected by the statistical artefact of ‘regression towards the mean’. I identify several cases where this artefact may have affected particular conclusions about the PoIE, and relate these to the historical origins of ‘regression towards the (...)
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  38. Alice Holzhey-Kunz (2012). Lebendigsein. Existenzialphilosophische Überlegungen zur Zweideutigkeit eines Grundgefühls. In Sabine Marienberg & Jörg Fingerhut (eds.), Feelings of Being Alive / Gefühle des Lebendigseins. De Gruyter 8--123.
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  39. Bernhard Irrgang (2009). Der Leib des Menschen: Grundriss Einer Phänomenologisch-Hermeneutischen Anthropologie. Steiner.
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  40. Matthias Jung (2012). Hintergrunderleben und semiotische Generalisierung. In Sabine Marienberg & Jörg Fingerhut (eds.), Feelings of Being Alive / Gefühle des Lebendigseins. De Gruyter 8--293.
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  41. Larisa Kiyashchenko (2008). Body Parts and Human Identity. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 5:41-47.
    Bioethics originated as a specific collective response of representatives of biomedical sciences, humanities and the public to the complexity of moral, anthropological and ontological problems (often in situations bordering on life and death) caused by the constant development of biomedical technologies. Because of this complexity ‐ these problems escape simple, universal (eternal) solutions. This makes them “finite”, multiple, dependent on the “here and now” circumstances of the choice of cognitive and communicative transdisciplinary strategies. In other words bioethics is a specific (...)
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  42. Philip J. Koch (1987). Bodily Feeling in Emotion. Dialogue 26 (1):59-75.
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  43. Stanisław Kowalczyk (2009). Ciało Człowieka W Refleksji Filozoficznej. Wydawn. Kul.
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  44. Joel Krueger (2008). Levinasian Reflections on Somaticity and the Ethical Self. Inquiry 51 (6):603 – 626.
    In this article, I attempt to bring some conceptual clarity to several key terms and foundational claims that make up Levinas's body-based conception of ethics. Additionally, I explore ways that Levinas's arguments about the somatic basis of subjectivity and ethical relatedness receive support from recent empirical research. The paper proceeds in this way: First, I clarify Levinas's use of the terms “sensibility”, “subjectivity”, and “proximity” in Otherwise than Being: or Beyond Essence . Next, I argue for an interpretation of Levinas's (...)
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  45. Olivier Lahbib (2005). La Liberté Dans la Perception Chez Husserl Et Fichte. Husserl Studies 21 (3):207-233.
    In spite of their opposite methods, Fichte's deductive process and Husserl's reduction cope with the same challenge: they aim to explain how the sensible world is dependent on reflixivity. As perception is generally linked with natural existence, and pure passivity, the deepest significance of transcendental thought in those philosophies consists in equalizing phenomenon and reflexion. In the heart of bodily life, some spiritual theme has to be found. Fichte defines action as the quantification of freedom, and freedom is effectively achieved (...)
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  46. D. Legrand, T. Grünbaum & J. Krueger (2009). Dimensions of Bodily Subjectivity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):279-283.
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  47. Anton Lethin (2005). Covert Agency with Proprioceptive Feedback. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (s 4-5):96-114.
    : Marcel says that the experience of ownership of actions is given in the specifications for action. He is referring not to a bodily movement but that which precedes it. Is the body involved or are all the changes in the brain? This paper examines the evidence for changes in the spinal cord and muscles that occur with motor imagery, simulation and preparation. There are changes in the alpha motoneurons and in the gamma motoneurons to the muscle spindles. These may (...)
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  48. S. Lijmbach, Animal Welfare: Bodily Experiences of Their Own Bodies.
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  49. Christian Lotz (2007). From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Christian Lotz shows in this book that Husserl's Phenomenology and its key concept--subjectivity--is based on a concrete anthropological structure, such as self-affection and the bodily experience of the other. The analysis of the sensual sphere and the lived Body forces Husserl to an ongoing correction of his strong methodological assumptions. Subjectivity turns out to be an ambivalent phenomenon, as the subject is unable to fully present itself to itself, and therefore is forced to allow for a fundamental non-transparency in itself.
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  50. Michael Aloysius MacConaill (1960). Bodily Structure and the Will. [London]Aquin Press.
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