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  1. Kevin Aho (2013). The Body. In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury 269.
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  2. Stacy Alaimo (2010). Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self. Indiana University Press.
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  3. Dr Michael L. Anderson (2003). Representations, Symbols and Embodiment. Philosophical Explorations.
    Response to "Embodied artificial intelligence", a commentary by Ron Chrisley.
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  4. Thomas Annese (1967). Actions and the Body. Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
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  5. David Appelbaum (1988). Making the Body Heard the Body's Way Toward Existence.
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  6. Horst Baier (1991). Schmutz Èuber Abfèalle in der Zivilisation Europas. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  7. Kurt Baier (1962). Pains. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):1-23.
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  8. Satina Barbara & Hultgren Francine (2001). The Absent Body of Girls Made Visible: Embodiment as the Focus in Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (6).
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  9. James Beebe, Is Consciousness Embodied?
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  10. Nicholas Beets (1966). Historical Actuality and Bodily Experience. Humanitas 2:15-28.
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  11. Ophelia Benson (2005). This Isn't My Body. The Philosophers' Magazine 32:15-17.
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  12. Outi Benson (2013). The Experience of Agency in the Feeling of Being Suicidal. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    Based on a qualitative study with 124 participants we explore what is in ordinary language referred to as 'suicidal feelings'. We identify four interrelated aspects of this experience, which together suggest that 'suicidal feelings' is in fact a 'feeling of being suicidal', an existential feeling. Although each experience is unique in its presentation, it is also the case that people who are suicidal tend to experience a combination of the following: 1) loss of consistency and/ or coherence in their sense (...)
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  13. Christer Bjurvill (1991). The Philosophy of the Body. Analecta Husserliana 35:317.
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  14. Andrew Blaikie (2004). The Body Critical Concepts in Sociology.
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  15. George Bondor (ed.) (2011). Sensuri Ale Corpului: Actele Celui de-Al 2-Lea Colocviu Al Centrului de Hermeneutică, Fenomologie Și Filosofie Practică, 28-29 Octombrie 2010, Universitatea "A. [REVIEW] Editura Universității "Alexandru Ioan Cuza".
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  16. Patrícia Silveirinha Castello Branco (2012). Cinema, The Body And Embodiment. Cinema 3:1-9.
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  17. Ewald Brunner (2011). Book Review Implications of Embodiment. [REVIEW] Mind and Matter 9 (2):211-215.
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  18. Havi Carel (2013). Bodily Doubt. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    In this paper I explore the tacit underlying sense of bodily certainty that characterizes normal everyday embodied experience. I then propose illness as one instance in which this certainty breaks down and is replaced by bodily doubt. I characterize bodily doubt as radically modifying our experience in three ways: loss of continuity, loss of transparency, and loss of faith in one's body. I then discuss the philosophical insights that arise from the experience of bodily doubt. The paper uses a Humean (...)
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  19. Lisa Marie Cassidy (2003). Different Bodies. Dissertation, The University of Connecticut
    This dissertation explores bodily responsibility, which I define as responsibility for the properties and appearances of one's body. The overall objective of the work is to present bodily responsibility as an important ethical topic. In doing so I answer two key questions: Do we have responsibility for the bodily properties we choose? Do we choose the bodily properties we for which are responsible? I begin by comparing four bodily responsibility accounts from the history of philosophy . The following chapters give (...)
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  20. Jennifer Church (1997). Ownership and the Body. In Diana T. Meyers (ed.), Feminists Rethink the Self. Westview Press
  21. Andy Clark (2007). Negotiating Embodiment: A Reply to Selinger and Engström. Janus Head 9 (2).
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  22. Jonathan Cole (2000). "Self-Consciousness and the Body": Commentary. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):50-52.
    Traditionally, what we are conscious of in self-consciousness is something non-corporeal. But anti-Cartesian philosophers argue that the self is as much corporeal as it is mental. Because we have the sense of proprioception, a kind of body awareness, we are immediately aware of ourselves as bodies in physical space. In this debate the case histories of patients who have lost their sense of proprioception are clearly relevant. These patients do retain an awareness of themselves as corporeal beings, although they hardly (...)
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  23. Jonathan Cole (1997). On 'Being Faceless': Selfhood and Facial Embodiment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (5-6):5-6.
    For most people a sense of self includes an embodied component: when describing our selves we describe those aspects of our physical bodies which can be easily codified: height, hair colour, sex, eye colour. Even when we consider ourselves we tend not to consider our intellectual cognitive characteristics but our describable anatomy. Wittgenstein's dictum, ‘the human body is the best picture of the human soul’, is relevant here but I would like to go further: the body-part we feel most embodied (...)
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  24. M. Connelly (2001). Deborah S. Wilson and Christine Moneera Laennec, Bodily Discursions: Genders, Representations, Technologies (1997). American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):367-369.
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  25. Sinigaglia Corrado (2012). Seeing with the Hands. In Paglieri F. (ed.), Consciousness in interaction: the role of the natural and social context in shaping consciousness. John Benjamins
    When witnessing someone else's action people often take advantage of the same motor cognition that is crucial to successfully perform that action themselves. But how deeply is motor cognition involved in understanding another's action? Can it be selectively modulated by either the agent's or the witness's being actually in the position to act? If this is the case, what does such modulation imply for one's making sense of others? The paper aims to tackle these issues by introducing and discussing a (...)
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  26. Edwin M. Curley (1978). 8. Body. In Descartes Against the Skeptics. Harvard University Press 207-234.
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  27. Kathy Davis (1997). 11'My Body is My Art'. In Embodied Practices: Feminist Perspectives on the Body. Sage 1--168.
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  28. Helena De Preester (2007). To Perform the Layered Body—a Short Exploration of the Body in Performance. Janus Head: Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature, Continental Philosophy, Phenomenological Psychology, and the Arts 9 (2):349-383.
    The aim of this article is to focus on the body as instrument or means in performance-art. Since the body is no monolithic given, the body is approached in terms of its constitutive layers, and this may enable us to conceive of the mechanisms that make performances possible and operational, i.e. those bodily mechanisms that are implicitly or explicitly controlled or manipulated in performance. Of course, the exploitation of these bodily layers is not solely responsible for the generation of meaning (...)
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  29. Frederique de Vignemont (2014). Pain and Bodily Care: Whose Body Matters? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (3):542-560.
    Pain is unpleasant. It is something that one avoids as much as possible. One might then claim that one wants to avoid pain because one cares about one's body. On this view, individuals who do not experience pain as unpleasant and to be avoided, like patients with pain asymbolia, do not care about their body. This conception of pain has been recently defended by Bain [2014] and Klein [forthcoming]. In their view, one needs to care about one's body for pain (...)
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  30. Michael Della Rocca (1999). If a Body Meet a Body. In Gennaro Rocco & Huenemann Charles (eds.), New Essays on the Rationalists. Oxford
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  31. M. Deutscher (1965). VESEY, G. N. A.: "The Embodied Mind". [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43:402.
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  32. Guy Dove (2013). Intermediate Representations Exclude Embodiment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):353 - 354.
    Given that Pickering & Garrod's (P&G's) account integrates language production and comprehension, it is reasonable to ask whether it is compatible with embodied cognition. I argue that its dependence on rich intermediate representations of linguistic structure excludes embodiment. Two options are available to supporters of embodied cognition: They can adopt a more liberal notion of embodiment or they can attempt to replace these intermediate representations with robustly embodied ones. Both of these options face challenges.
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  33. Julie Doyle (2008). The Spectre of the Scalpel: The Historical Role of Surgery and Anatomy in Conceptions of Embodiment. Body and Society 14 (1):9-30.
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  34. Self-Body Dualism (2010). 6 Why My Body is Not Me. In Antonella Corradini & Timothy O'Connor (eds.), Emergence in Science and Philosophy. Routledge 6--127.
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  35. P. Dwyer (2000). Kathleen Wider, the Bodily Nature of Consciousness: Sartre and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Dialogue 39:186-188.
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  36. Phil Dwyer (2000). The Bodily Nature of Consciousness. Dialogue 39 (1):186-188.
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  37. A. R. E. (1966). The Problem of Embodiment: Some Contributions to a Phenomenology of the Body. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):604-605.
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  38. James M. Edie (1967). The Problem of Embodiment, Some Contributions to a Phenomenology of the Body. Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (3):301-305.
  39. Alexis Elder (2013). Proprioception, Anosognosia, and the Richness of Conscious Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (3-4):3-4.
    Proprioception, a sense of bodily position and movement, is rarely the focus of conscious experience. If we are ordinarily conscious of proprioception, we seem only peripherally so. Thus, evidence that proprioception is present in the periphery of at least some conscious experiences seems to be good evidence that conscious experience is fairly rich. Anosognosia for paralysis is a denial of paralysis of one's limbs, usually in the wake of brain damage from stroke. Because anosognosic patients overlook their paralysis, anosognosia seems (...)
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  40. Roy Elveton (2005). What is Embodiment? In L. Magnani & R. Dossena (eds.), Computing, Philosophy and Cognition. 4--243.
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  41. Anthony Faiola, Preethi Srinivas, Rebecca Finch & Zhengxiao Wu, Symbiont Consciousness: Sociocultural Embodied Augmentation of Humanity.
    The psychology of consciousness as explained by Vygotsky is the ability of one to focus on the inner state of being. Vygotsky’s proposition of external tools redistributing mental and external processes into internalized acts lacks the concept of embodied mediational tools existing in the current world as computational artifacts extending or augmenting human capabilities. This paper proposes sociocultural embodied augmentation theory (SEAT) as a means to explain the impact of augmenting technologies on Vygotsky’s original notion of “psychological tool,” therefore initiating (...)
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  42. A. G. N. Flew (1966). VESEY, G. N. A. - "The Embodied Mind". [REVIEW] Mind 75:602.
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  43. J. A. M. Frederiks (1969). Disorders of the Body Schema. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland 4--207.
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  44. Shaun Gallagher (2001). Dimensions of Embodiment: Body Image and Body Schema in Medical Contexts. In Kay Toombs (ed.), Handbook of Phenomenology and Medicine. Kluwer 147--175.
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  45. Shaun Gallagher & Mette Vaever (2007). Body: Disorders of Embodiment. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. OUP Usa
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  46. Edwin E. Gantt (2001). The Body. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):96-97.
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  47. Rudolf J. Gerber (1966). The Problem of Embodiment. International Philosophical Quarterly 6 (2):328-329.
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  48. Elizabeth Grosz (1992). The Body. In Elizabeth Wright (ed.), Feminism and Psychoanalysis: A Critical Dictionary. Blackwell 35--40.
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  49. Frederick Guyette (2011). Embodiment. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (2):239-248.
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  50. Jonathan Harrison (1973). The Embodiment of Mind or What Use Is Having a Body? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74:35 - 55.
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