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  1. Peter R. Anstey (ed.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press.
    These far-reaching essays discuss not only central debates and canonical authors from Francis Bacon to Isaac Newton, but also explore less well-known figures and topics from the period.
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  2. Marina Paola Banchetti (1992). My Station and Its Duties. Idealistic Studies 22 (1):11-27.
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  3. V. C. Chappell (ed.) (1992). Seventeenth-Century British Philosophers. Garland Pub..
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  4. Sorana Corneanu (2011). Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition. The University of Chicago Press.
    Francis Bacon and the art of direction -- An art of tempering the mind -- The distempered mind and the tree of knowledge -- A comprehensive culture of the mind -- The end of knowledge -- The study of nature as regimen -- Cultura and medicina animi: an early modern tradition -- The physician of the soul -- Sources -- Genres -- Utility: practical versus speculative knowledge -- Self-love and the fallen/uncultured mind -- The office of reason -- Passions, errors, (...)
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  5. Stephen L. Darwall (1995). The British Moralists and the Internal "Ought", 1640-1740. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major work in the history of ethics, and provides the first study of early modern British philosophy in several decades. Professor Darwall discerns two distinct traditions feeding into the moral philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. On the one hand, there is the empirical, naturalist tradition, comprising Hobbes, Locke, Cumberland, Hutcheson, and Hume, which argues that obligation is the practical force that empirical discoveries acquire in the process of deliberation. On the other hand, there is (...)
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  6. M. A. Stewart (ed.) (2000). English Philosophy in the Age of Locke. Oxford University Press.
    Investigating key issues in English philosophical, political, and religious thought in the second half of the seventeenth century, this book presents a set of new and intriguing essays on the topics. Particular emphasis is given to the interaction between philosophy and religion among leading political thinkers of the period; connections between philosophical debate on personhood, certainty, and the foundations of faith; and new conceptions of biblical exegesis.
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