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  1. William L. Ames (1993). Bhāvaviveka's Prajñāpradīpa. Journal of Indian Philosophy 21 (3):209-259.
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  2. Dan Arnold (2010). Self-Awareness ( Svasaṃvitti ) and Related Doctrines of Buddhists Following Dignāga: Philosophical Characterizations of Some of the Main Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):323-378.
    Framed as a consideration of the other contributions to the present volume of the Journal of Indian Philosophy , this essay attempts to scout and characterize several of the interrelated doctrines and issues that come into play in thinking philosophically about the doctrine of svasaṃvitti , particularly as that was elaborated by Dignāga and Dharmakīrti. Among the issues thus considered are the question of how mānasapratyakṣa (which is akin to manovijñāna ) might relate to svasaṃvitti ; how those related doctrines (...)
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  3. Dan Arnold (2006). On Semantics and Saṃketa: Thoughts on a Neglected Problem with Buddhist Apoha Doctrine. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (5):415-478.
    “...a theory of meaning for a particular language should be conceived by a philosopher as describing the practice of linguistic interchange by speakers of the language without taking it as already understood what it is to have a language at all: that is what, by imagining such a theory, we are trying to make explict." – Michael Dummer (2004: 31).
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  4. Dan Arnold (2005). Is Svasaṃvitti Transcendental? A Tentative Reconstruction Following Śāntarakṣita. Asian Philosophy 15 (1):77 – 111.
  5. Dan Arnold (2001). Intrinsic Validity Reconsidered: A Sympathetic Study of the MÄ«māMsaka Inversion of Buddhist Epistemology. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 29 (5/6):589-675.
  6. B. L. Atreya (1962). The Elements of Indian Logic. Moradabad, Darshana Printers.
  7. Lata S. Bapat (1989). Buddhist Logic: A Fresh Study of Dharmakīrti's Philosophy. Bharatiya Vidya Prakashan.
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  8. V. K. Bharadwaja (1984). Rationality, Argumentation and Embarrassment: A Study of Four Logical Alternatives (Catuṣkoṭi) in Buddhist Logic. Philosophy East and West 34 (3):303-319.
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  9. Lajos L. Brons (2012). Dharmakīrti, Davidson, and Knowing Reality. Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):30-57.
    If we distinguish phenomenal effects from their noumenal causes, the former being our conceptual(ized) experiences, the latter their grounds or causes in reality ‘as it is’ independent of our experience, then two contradictory positions with regards to the relationship between these two can be distinguished: either phenomena are identical with their noumenal causes, or they are not. Davidson is among the most influential modern defenders of the former position, metaphysical non-dualism. Dharmakīrti’s strict distinction between ultimate and conventional reality, on the (...)
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  10. Guy Bugault (1983). Logic and Dialectics in the Madhyamakakārikās. Journal of Indian Philosophy 11 (1):7-76.
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  11. Christian Coseru, Taking the Intentionality of Perception Seriously: Why Phenomenology is Inescapable.
    The Buddhist philosophical investigation of the elements of existence and/or experience (or dharmas) provides the basis on which Dignāga, Dharmakīrti, and their followers deliberate on such topics as the ontological status of external objects and the epistemic import of perceptual states of cognitive awareness. In this essay I will argue that the Buddhist epistemologists, insofar as they accord perception a privileged epistemic status, share a common ground with phenomenologists in the tradition of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty, who contend that perception is (...)
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  12. Christian Coseru (2009). Buddhist 'Foundationalism' and the Phenomenology of Perception. Philosophy East and West 59 (4):409-439.
    In this essay, which draws on a set of interrelated issues in the phenomenology of perception, I call into question the assumption that Buddhist philosophers of the Dignāga-Dharmakīrti tradition pursue a kind of epistemic foundationalism. I argue that the embodied cognition paradigm, which informs recent efforts within the Western philosophical tradition to overcome the Cartesian legacy, can be also found– albeit in a modified form–in the Buddhist epistemological tradition. In seeking to ground epistemology in the phenomenology of cognition, the Buddhist (...)
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  13. Christian Coseru (2009). Naturalism and Intentionality: A Buddhist Epistemological Approach. Asian Philosophy 19 (3):239-264.
    In this paper I propose a naturalist account of the Buddhist epistemological discussion of _svasa(m)dotvitti_ ('self-awareness', 'self-cognition') following similar attempts in the domains of phenomenology and analytic epistemology. First, I examine the extent to which work in naturalized epistemology and phenomenology, particularly in the areas of perception and intentionality, could be profitably used in unpacking the implications of the Buddhist epistemological project. Second, I argue against a foundationalist reading of the causal account of perception offered by (...)
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  14. Christian Coseru (2006). A "Restricted" Interpretation of Dharmakīrti's Philosophy. [REVIEW] H-Net Reviews in the Humanities and Social Sciences (May).
    The continuing surge in work on Dharmakīrti represents one of the most fertile enterprises within the field of Buddhist Studies. The only South Asian philosopher to have been the subject of four international conferences, Dharmakīrti commands a veritable legacy of scholarship, whether directly, through the translation and study of his own works, or indirectly, through the study of his followers, commentators, and one-time opponents.[1] In the context of this burgeoning enterprise, characterized by a high degree of specialization, any attempt to (...)
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  15. Matthew R. Dasti (2010). Against a Hindu God by Parimal G. Patil (Columbia University Press 2009). [REVIEW] Journal of Asian Studies.
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  16. Douglas D. Daye (1979). Empirical Falsifiability And The Frequence Of Darsana Relevance In The Sixth Century Buddhist Logic Of Sankarasvamin. Logique Et Analyse 22 (March-June):223-237.
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  17. Douglas Dunsmore Daye (1979). Metalogical Cliches (Proto-Variables) and Their Restricted Substitution in Sixth Century Buddhist Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (3):549-558.
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  18. Douglas Dunsmore Daye (1977). Metalogical Incompatibilities in the Formal Description of Buddhist Logic (Nyāya). Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 18 (2):221-231.
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  19. R. Lance Factor (1983). What is the "Logic" in Buddhist Logic? Philosophy East and West 33 (2):183-188.
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  20. Jonardon Ganeri (2002). Jaina Logic and the Philosophical Basis of Pluralism. History and Philosophy of Logic 23 (4):267-281.
    What is the rational response when confronted with a set of propositions each of which we have some reason to accept, and yet which taken together form an inconsistent class? This was, in a nutshell, the problem addressed by the Jaina logicians of classical India, and the solution they gave is, I think, of great interest, both for what it tells us about the relationship between rationality and consistency, and for what we can learn about the logical basis of philosophical (...)
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  21. Jay Garfield (1995). The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārikā. Oxford University Press.
    For nearly two thousand years Buddhism has mystified and captivated both lay people and scholars alike. Seen alternately as a path to spiritual enlightenment, an system of ethical and moral rubrics, a cultural tradition, or simply a graceful philosophy of life, Buddhism has produced impassioned followers the world over. The Buddhist saint Nagarjuna, who lived in South India in approximately the first century CE, is undoubtedly the most important, influential, and widely studied Mahayana Buddhist philosopher. His many works include texts (...)
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  22. Chien-Hsing Ho (2007). Consciousness and Self-Awareness. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):213 – 230.
    In this paper I propose to inquire into the theory of self-awareness propounded by the two Buddhist epistemologists, Dignaga and Dharmakirti. I first give an outline of the Buddhist notion of consciousness, then deal with the notion of objectual appearance, and finally dwell on the theory itself together with certain arguments in its favor. It is shown that the Buddhists subscribed themselves to the following self-awareness thesis: that our waking consciousness is always pre-reflectively and nonconceptually aware of itself. Adopting an (...)
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  23. Frank J. Hoffman (2001). Non-Dual Awareness and Logic. Asian Philosophy 11 (2):125 – 132.
    The thesis of this paper is that the question of whether and how statements of the form 'p and not-p' can have religious meaning in Buddhism can be answered in the affirmative and how in terms of a movement from pre-meditative to meditative state to a post-meditative state in life. The paper focuses on the Diamond Sutra in light of Shigenori Nagatomo's study (Asian Philosophy Vol. 10, No. 3, 2000) and advances an additional line of inquiry. This view emphasises the (...)
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  24. Bimal Krishna Matilal (1970). Reference and Existence in Nyāya and Buddhist Logic. Journal of Indian Philosophy 1 (1):83-110.
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  25. A. C. S. McDermott (1970). Empty Subject Terms in Late Buddhist Logic. Journal of Indian Philosophy 1 (1):22-29.
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  26. Graham Priest (2008). Jaina Logic: A Contemporary Perspective. History and Philosophy of Logic 29 (3):263-278.
    Jaina philosophy provides a very distinctive account of logic, based on the theory of ?sevenfold predication?. This paper provides a modern formalisation of the logic, using the techniques of many-valued and modal logic. The formalisation is applied, in turn, to some of the more problematic aspects of Jaina philosophy, especially its relativism.
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  27. Ratnakīrti (1970). An Eleventh-Century Buddhist Logic of Exists. Dordrecht,D. Reidel.
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  28. F. I. Shcherbatskoĭ (1970). Buddhist Logic. Biblio Verlag.
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  29. Fedor Ippolitovich Shcherbatskoĭ (1962). Buddhist Logic. New York, Dover Publications.
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  30. Jonathan Stoltz (2009). Buddhist Epistemology: The Study of Pramana. Religion Compass 3 (4):537-548.
    Epistemology – the study of the nature and scope of knowledge – has been an integral topic in Indian and Tibetan Buddhist scholastic communities for the past 1500 years. This article provides an overview of the Buddhist epistemological tradition, emphasizing the central role that the concept of pramana plays in Indian theories of knowledge. After elucidating the two pramanas accepted by the Buddhist epistemological tradition, the article concludes by discussing the relationship between Buddhist epistemology and Buddhist soteriology.
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  31. Alex Wayman (1999). A Millennium of Buddhist Logic. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    This is volume One of texts (from sanskrit and Tibetan sources) of the two planned volumes on Buddhist Ligic (the second volume to be on topics and opponents).
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  32. Jiang Wu (2003). Buddhist Logic and Apologetics in 17th Century China: An Analysis of the Use of Buddhist Syllogisms in an Anti-Christian Polemic. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 2 (2):273-289.
    A glimpse of the new application of Buddhist logic in the seventeenth century leads us to reflect about our approach to logic in a given religious tradition: Should we isolate a logical system from the very context that has given rise to the genesis and development of such an intellectual apparatus? Methodologically, we do have the legitimate right to approach Buddhist logic from a purely logical point of view. However, when we study the actual use of Buddhist logic in the (...)
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  33. Zhihua Yao (2011). Non-Cognition and the Third Pramāṇa. In Helmut Krasser, Horst Lasic, Eli Franco & Birgit Kellner (eds.), Religion and Logic in Buddhist Philosophical Analysis. Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
    The present paper discusses some concepts and materials that may be linked to Īśvarasena’s theory of non-cognition. These include the concept of feiliang 非量 as found in the writings of Dharmapāla, Asvabhāva, Jinaputra and their Chinese counterparts, and apramāṇatā (or apramāṇatva), as found in the works of Dharmakīrti and his commentators. I shall demonstrate that the two concepts in many ways mirror the theory of three pramāṇas, proposed by Īśvarasena. As most of these materials are from the sixth to eighth (...)
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  34. Zhihua Yao (2009). Empty Subject Terms in Buddhist Logic: Dignāga and His Chinese Commentators. Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (4):383-398.
    The problem of empty terms is one of the focal issues in analytic philosophy. Russell’s theory of descriptions, a proposal attempting to solve this problem, attracted much attention and is considered a hallmark of the analytic tradition. Scholars of Indian and Buddhist philosophy, e.g., McDermott, Matilal, Shaw and Perszyk, have studied discussions of empty terms in Indian and Buddhist philosophy. But most of these studies rely heavily on the Nyāya or Navya-Nyāya sources, in which Buddhists are portrayed as opponents to (...)
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