This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
9 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Andrew V. Abela (2001). Profit and More: Catholic Social Teaching and the Purpose of the Firm. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):107 - 116.
    The empirical findings in Collins and Porras'' study of visionary companies, Built to Last, and the normative claims about the purpose of the business firm in Centesimus Annus are found to be complementary in understanding the purpose of the business firm. A summary of the methodology and findings of Built to Lastand a short overview of Catholic Social Teaching are provided. It is shown that Centesimus Annus'' claim that the purpose of the firm is broader than just profit is consistent (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei (2009). Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):473 - 482.
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study in the Chinese automobile (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ericka Costa & Tommaso Ramus (2012). The Italian Economia Aziendale and Catholic Social Teaching: How to Apply the Common Good Principle at the Managerial Level. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):103-116.
    The ongoing global economic and financial crisis has exposed the risks of considering market and business organizations only as instruments for creating economic wealth while paying little heed to their role in ethics and values. Catholic Social Teaching (CST) could provide a useful contribution in rethinking the role of values in business organizations and markets because CST puts forward an anthropological view that involves thinking of the marketplace as a community of persons with the aim of participating in the Common (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Luis Ferruz, Fernando Muñoz & María Vargas (2012). Managerial Abilities: Evidence From Religious Mutual Fund Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):503-517.
    In this study, we analyze the financial performance and the managerial abilities of religious mutual fund managers, implementing a comparative analysis with conventional mutual funds. We use a broad sample, free of survivorship bias, of religious equity mutual funds from the US market, for the period from January 1994 to September 2010. We build a matched-pair conventional sample in order to compare the results obtained for both kinds of mutual fund managers. We analyze stock-picking and market timing abilities, topics widely (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Donald E. Frey (1998). Individualist Economic Values and Self-Interest: The Problem in the Puritan Ethic. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (14):1573-1580.
    The Puritan ethic is conventionally interpreted as a set of individualistic values that encourage a degree of self-interest inimical to the good of organizations and society. A closer reading of original Puritan moralists reveals a different ethic. Puritan moralists simultaneously legitimated economic individualism while urging individuals to work for the common good. They contrasted self-interest and the common good, which they understood to be the sinful and moral ends, respectively, of economic individualism. This polarity can be found in all the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Hershey H. Friedman (1985). Ethical Behavior in Business: A Hierarchical Approach From the Talmud. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):117 - 129.
    The Talmud, the compilation of Jewish oral law, is over 1500 years old and includes extensive discussions of business ethics. This paper presents four levels of ethical behavior in business gleaned from the words of the Talmud. At the lowest level, an individual is just barely inside the law; the highest level is the way of the pious. The author has attempted to relate the ethics in ancient business situations to business practices today.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Stewart W. Herman (2011). Spirituality, Inc. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):533-537.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Joan Marques (2012). Consciousness at Work: A Review of Some Important Values, Discussed From a Buddhist Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):27-40.
    This article reviews the element of consciousness from a Buddhist and a non-Buddhist (Western) perspective. Within the Buddhist perspective, two practices toward attaining expanded and purified consciousness will be included: the Seven-Point Mind Training and Vipassana. Within the Western perspective, David Hawkins’ works on consciousness will be used as a main guide. In addition, a number of important concepts that contribute to expanded and purified consciousness will be presented. Among these concepts are impermanence, karma, non-harming (ahimsa), ethics, kindness and compassion, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Shahnaz Naughton & Tony Naughton (2000). Religion, Ethics and Stock Trading: The Case of an Islamic Equities Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):145 - 159.
    Islamic banking, based on the prohibition of interest, is well established throughout the Muslim world. Attention has now turned towards applying Islamic principles in equity markets. The search for alternatives to Western style markets has been given added impetus in Muslim countries by the turmoil in Asian financial markets in 1997. Common stocks are a legitimate form of instrument in Islam, but many of the practices associated with stock trading are not. In this paper the instruments traded and the structure (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation