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  1. Judith Andre (1999). The Alleged Incompatibility of Business and Medical Ethics. HEC Forum 11 (4):288-292.
    Business Ethics and medical ethics are in principle compatible: In particular, the tools of business ethics can be useful to those doing healthcare ethics. Health care could be conducted as a business and maintain its moral core.
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  2. Adam D. Bailey (2011). The Nonworseness Claim and the Moral Permissibility of Better-Than-Permissible Acts. Philosophia 39 (2):237-250.
    Grounded in what Alan Wertheimer terms the nonworseness claim, it is thought by some philosophers that what will be referred to herein as better-than-permissible acts —acts that, if undertaken, would make another or others better off than they would be were an alternative but morally permissible act to be undertaken—are necessarily morally permissible. What, other than a bout of irrationality, it may be thought, would lead one to hold that an act (such as outsourcing production to a sweatshop in a (...)
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  3. Janet Borgerson (2007). On the Harmony of Feminist Ethics and Business Ethics. Business and Society Review 112 (4):477-509.
    If business requires ethical solutions that are viable in the liminal landscape between concepts and corporate office, then business ethics and corporate social responsibility should offer tools that can survive the trek, that flourish in this well-traveled, but often unarticulated, environment. Indeed, feminist ethics produces, accesses, and engages such tools. However, work in BE and CSR consistently conflates feminist ethics and feminine ethics and care ethics. I offer clarification and invoke the analytic power of three feminist ethicists 'in action' whose (...)
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  4. Janet Borgerson, Jonathan Schroeder, Martin Escudero Magnusson & Frank Magnusson (2009). Corporate Communication, Ethics, and Identity. Business Ethics - A European Review 18 (3):209-223.
    This article investigates conceptual and strategic relationships between corporate identity, organizational identity and ethics, utilizing the Benetton Corporation as an illustrative case study. Although much attention has been given to visual aspects of Benetton's renowned ethical brand building efforts, few studies have looked at how Benetton's employees, retail environments, and trade events express ethical aspects of their well-known corporate identity. Operational identity emerged as a useful complement to models of corporate identity. A multi-method case study, including interviews at retail outlets (...)
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  5. George G. Brenkert (1997). Radical Feminism and Business Ethics. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:95-104.
  6. Stephen R. C. Hicks (2009). What Business Ethics Can Learn From Entrepreneurship. Journal of Private Enterprise 24 (2):49-57.
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  7. Christoph Luetge (2012). Fundamentals of Order Ethics: Law, Business Ethics and the Financial Crisis. Archiv für Rechts- Und Sozialphilosophie Beihefte 130:11-21.
    During the current financial crisis, the need for an alternative to a laissez-faire ethics of capitalism (the Milton Friedman view) becomes clear. I argue that we need an order ethics which employs economics as a key theoretical resource and which focuses on institutions for implementing moral norms. -/- I will point to some aspects of order ethics which highlight the importance of rules, e.g. global rules for the financial markets. In this regard, order ethics (“Ordnungsethik”) is the complement of the (...)
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  8. Lawrence Masek (2006). Deadly Drugs and the Doctrine of Double Effect: A Reply to Tully. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):143-151.
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Patrick Tully criticizes my view that the doctrine of double effect does not prohibit a pharmaceutical company from selling a drug that has potentially fatal side-effects and that does not treat a life-threatening condition. Tully alleges my account is too permissive and makes the doctrine irrelevant to decisions about selling harmful products. In the following paper, I respond to Tully’s objections and show that he misinterprets my position and misstates some elements of the (...)
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  9. Jeffrey Moriarty (2010). Participation in the Workplace: Are Employees Special? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):373 - 384.
    Many arguments have been advanced in favor of employee participation in firm decision-making. Two of the most influential are the "interest protection argument" and the "autonomy argument." I argue that the case for granting participation rights to some other stakeholders, such as suppliers and community members, is at least as strong, according to the reasons given in these arguments, as the case for granting them to certain employees. I then consider how proponents of these arguments might modify their arguments, or (...)
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  10. Jeffrey Moriarty (2008). Business Ethics: An Overview. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):956-972.
    This essay provides an overview of business ethics. I describe important issues, identify some of the normative considerations animating them, and offer a roadmap of references for those wishing to learn more. I focus on issues in normative business ethics, but discuss briefly the growing body of work in descriptive business ethics. I conclude with a comment on the changing nature of the field.
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  11. Jeffrey Moriarty (2007). McMahon on Workplace Democracy. Journal of Business Ethics 71 (4):339 - 345.
    This paper offers a sympathetic critique of Christopher McMahon’s Authority and Democracy: A General Theory of Government and Management. Although I find fault with some of his arguments, my goal is not to show that these arguments are irreparable, but to highlight issues that deserve further consideration. After defining some terms, first, I raise an objection to McMahon’s rejection of the moral unity of management (MUM) thesis. Second, I draw attention to his “moralization” of the workplace, and examine the role (...)
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  12. Stephen Wilmot (2000). Corporate Moral Responsibility in Health Care. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):139-146.
    The question of corporate moral responsibility – of whether it makes sense to hold an organisation corporately morally responsible for its actions,rather than holding responsible the individuals who contributed to that action – has been debated over a number of years in the business ethics literature. However, it has had little attention in the world of health care ethics. Health care in the United Kingdom(UK) is becoming an increasingly corporate responsibility, so the issue is increasingly relevant in the health care (...)
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  13. Matt Zwolinski (2012). Structural Exploitation. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (1):154-179.
    It is commonly claimed that workers in sweatshops are wrongfully exploited by their employers. The economist's standard response to this claim is to point out that sweatshops provide their workers with tremendous benefits, more than most workers elsewhere in the economy receive and more than most of those who complain about sweatshop exploitation provide. Perhaps, though, the wrongfulness of sweatshop exploitation is to be found not in the discrete interaction between a sweatshop and its employees, but in the unjust political (...)
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  14. Matt Zwolinski (2010). Price Gouging and Market Failure. In Gerald Gaus, Julian Lamont & Christi Favor (eds.), ESSAYS ON PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS & ECONOMIC: INTEGRATION AND COMMON RESEARCH PROJECTS. Stanford University Press.
    Price gouging occurs when, in the wake of an emergency, sellers of a certain necessary goods sharply raise their prices beyond the level needed to cover increased costs. Most people think that price gouging is immoral, and most states have laws rendering the practice a civil or criminal offense. But the alleged wrongness of price gouging has been seriously under-theorized. This paper examines the argument that price gouging is morally objectionable and/or the proper subject of legal regulation because of the (...)
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  15. Matt Zwolinski (2008). The Ethics of Price Gouging. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (3):347-378.
    Price gouging occurs when, in the wake of an emergency, sellers of a certain necessary goods sharply raise their prices beyond the level needed to cover increased costs. Most people think that price gouging is immoral, and most states have laws rendering the practice a civil or criminal offense. The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the philosophic issues surrounding price gouging, and to argue that the common moral condemnation of it is largely mistaken. I make this (...)
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Teaching Business Ethics
  1. Mohammad J. Abdolmohammadi, David R. L. Gabhart & M. Francis Reeves (1997). Ethical Cognition of Business Students Individually and in Groups. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (16):1717-1725.
    This study provides evidence regarding the level of ethical cognition of business students at the entry to college as compared to a national norm. It also provides comparative evidence on the effects of group versus individual ethical cognition upon completion of a business ethics course. The Principled Score (P-score) from the Defining Issues Test (DIT) was used to measure the ethical cognition of a total sample of 301 business students (273 entering students plus 28 students in a business ethics course). (...)
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  2. Janet S. Adams, Claudia Harris & Susan S. Carley (1998). Challenges in Teaching Business Ethics: Using Role Set Analysis of Early Career Dilemmas. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (12):1325-1335.
    Emphasis in business ethics texts and courses has generally focused on corporate and other relatively high-level ethical issues. However, business school graduates in early career stages report ethical dilemmas involving individual-level decisions, often including influence attempts from one or more members of their work role sets. This paper proposes the use of role set analysis as a pedagogical technique for helping individuals to anticipate and deal with early-career ethical issues.
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  3. Vidya N. Awasthi (2008). Managerial Decision-Making on Moral Issues and the Effects of Teaching Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):207 - 223.
    This study uses judgment and decision-making (JDM) perspective with the help of framing and schema literature from cognitive psychology to evaluate how managers behave when problems with unethical overtones are presented to them in a managerial frame rather than an ethical frame. In the proposed managerial model, moral judgment of the situation is one of the inputs to managerial judgment, among several other inputs regarding costs and benefits of various alternatives. Managerial judgment results in managerial intent leading to managerial action. (...)
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  4. Terrence R. Bishop (1992). Integrating Business Ethics Into an Undergraduate Curriculum. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (4):291 - 299.
    The paper describes the approach by which ethics are integrated into the undergraduate curriculum at Northern Illinois University''s College of Business. Literature is reviewed to identify conceptual frameworks for, and issues associated with, the teaching of business ethics. From the review, a set of guidelines for teaching ethics is developed and proposed. The objectives and strategies implemented for teaching ethics is discussed. Foundation and follow-up coursework, measurement issues and ancillary programs are also discussed.
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  5. Walter Block & Paul F. Cwik (2007). Teaching Business Ethics: A 'Classificationist' Approach. Business Ethics 16 (2):98–106.
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  6. Charles D. Bodkin & Thomas H. Stevenson (2007). University Students' Perceptions Regarding Ethical Marketing Practices: Affecting Change Through Instructional Techniques. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):207 - 228.
    Many believe that colleges of business have a role to play in improving the level of marketing ethics practiced in the business world, while others believe that by the time students reach the level of university education, their ethical beliefs are so ingrained as to be virtually unalterable. The purpose of this study is to add to the literature regarding university students’ ethical value judgments. It utilizes scenario studies to assess base line ethical values of junior level undergraduate business administration (...)
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  7. Susan M. Bosco, David E. Melchar, Laura L. Beauvais & David E. Desplaces (2010). Teaching Business Ethics: The Effectiveness of Common Pedagogical Practices in Developing Students' Moral Judgment Competence. Ethics and Education 5 (3):263 - 280.
    This study investigates the effectiveness of pedagogical practices used to teach business ethics. The business community has greatly increased its demands for better ethics education in business programs. Educators have generally agreed that the ethical principles of business people have declined. It is important, then, to examine how common methods of instruction used in business ethics could contribute to the development of higher levels of moral judgment competence for students. To determine the effectiveness of these methods, moral judgment competence levels (...)
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  8. F. Neil Brady & Jeanne M. Logsdon (1988). Zimbardo's “Stanford Prison Experiment” and the Relevance of Social Psychology for Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (9):703 - 710.
    The prevailing pedagogical approach in business ethics generally underestimates or even ignores the powerful influences of situational factors on ethical analysis and decision-making. This is due largely to the predominance of philosophy-oriented teaching materials. Social psychology offers relevant concepts and experiments that can broaden pedagogy to help students understand more fully the influence of situational contexts and role expectations in ethical analysis. Zimbardo's Stanford Prison Experiment is used to illustrate the relevance of social psychology experiments for business ethics instruction.
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  9. Johannes Brinkmann (2009). Using Ibsen in Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):11 - 24.
    To celebrate the 100th anniversary of Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen's death, during 2006 quite a number of cultural events were launched (cf. http://www.ibsen.net/). The article suggests celebrating Ibsen as a potentially useful resource for business ethics teaching. Departing from a short presentation of Ibsen's plays An enemy of the people and A doll's house the main focus of this paper is on two selected scenes from the latter piece -both as raw material for developing scenarios for moral maturity assessment (one (...)
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  10. Johannes Brinkmann & Ann-Mari Henriksen (2008). Vocational Ethics as a Subspecialty of Business Ethics – Structuring a Research and Teaching Field. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):623 - 634.
    Vocational ethics and vocational moral socialization are important for the business ethical climate in a given country and in a given industry, but have not received attention in the literature. Our article suggests vocational ethics as a legitimate sub-specialty for business ethics research and development. The article addresses the exposure of vocational students to a combination of vocational school-based and workplace-based socialization, and outlines an agenda for teaching-oriented research and research-based teaching. More specifically, we first draft a conceptual frame of (...)
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  11. Johannes Brinkmann & Knut J. Ims (2004). A Conflict Case Approach to Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):123-136.
    Departing from frequent use of moral conflict cases in business ethics teaching and research, the paper suggests an elaboration of a moral conflict approach within business ethics, both conceptually and philosophically. The conceptual elaboration borrows from social science conflict research terminology, while the philosophical elaboration presents casuistry as a kind of practical, inductive argumentation with a focus on paradigmatic examples.
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  12. Scot Burton, Mark W. Johnston & Elizabeth J. Wilson (1991). An Experimental Assessment of Alternative Teaching Approaches for Introducing Business Ethics to Undergraduate Business Students. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (7):507 - 517.
    This study employs a pretest-posttest experimental design to extend recent research pertaining to the effects of teaching business ethics material. Results on a variety of perceptual and attitudinal measures are compared across three groups of students — one which discussed the ethicality of brief business situations (the business scenario discussion approach), one which was given a more philosophically oriented lecture (the philosophical lecture approach), and a third group which received no specific lecture or discussion pertaining to business ethics. Results showed (...)
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  13. David E. Cooper (1985). Cognitive Development and Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 4 (4):313 - 329.
    This paper discusses how to use cognitive developmental psychology to create a business ethics course that has philosophical integrity. It begins with the pedagogical problem to be overcome when students are not philosophy majors. To provide a context for the practical recommendations, Kohlberg's cognitive developmental theory is summarized and then the relationship between Kohlberg's theory, normative philosophy, and teaching is analyzed. The conclusion recommends strategies that should help overcome some of the vexing pedagogical problems mentioned in the first section. In (...)
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  14. Christopher J. Cowton & Thomas W. Dunfee (1995). Internationalizing the Business Ethics Curriculum: A Survey. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (5):331 - 338.
    This article reports on a telephone survey of business school faculty in the United Kingdom, Asia and North America concerning efforts to internationalize the teaching of business ethics. International dimensions of business ethics are currently given only limited coverage in the business school curriculum with over half of the faculty surveyed indicating that less then 10% of their ethics teaching focuses on global issues. Teaching objectives vary widely with some faculty emphasizing a relativistic, diversity oriented perspective while others stress the (...)
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  15. Wesley Cragg (1997). Teaching Business Ethics: The Role of Ethics in Business and in Business Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (3):231-245.
    The paper begins with an examination of traditional attitudes towards business ethics. I suggest that these attitudes fail to recognize that a principal function of ethics is to facilitate cooperation. Further that despite the emphasis on competition in modern market economies, business like all other forms of social activity is possible only where people are prepared to respect rules in the absence of which cooperation is rendered difficult or impossible. Rules or what I call the ethics of doing, however, constitute (...)
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  16. Robbin Derry & Ronald M. Green (1989). Ethical Theory in Business Ethics: A Critical Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (7):521 - 533.
    How is ethical theory used in contemporary teaching in business ethics? To answer this question, we undertook a survey of twenty-five of the leading business ethics texts. Our purpose was to examine the ways in which normative moral theory is introduced and applied to cases and issues. We focused especially on the authors' views of the conflicts and tensions posed by basic theoretical debates. How can these theories be made useful if fundamental tensions are acknowledged? Our analysis resulted in a (...)
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  17. Joseph R. DesJardins & Ernest Diedrich (2003). Learning What It Really Costs: Teaching Business Ethics with Life-Cycle Case Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):33-42.
    Sustainability informs the framework for a seminar that we teach for junior and senior undergraduates entitled "The Ethics and Economics of Sustainable Societies." One of the class requirements has each student research and write a life-cycle case study, an exercise in which they trace the full, or partial, life-cycle of some product with which they are familiar. Students are expected to examine the economic, ethical, and ecological implications along each step in the life-cycle of the product. We believe that life-cycle (...)
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  18. Michael Devaney (2007). MBA Education, Business Ethics and the Case for Shareholder Value. Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):199-205.
    The appropriate MBA curriculum has been debated for nearly a half century. More recently, critics contend that the emphasis on functional fields in MBA education has incorrectly elevated the importance of shareholder value resulting in unethical behavior. Although some criticism of MBA programs has merit, shareholder wealth maximization should remain the dominant management objective because it is relatively easy to implement and generally consistent with the interests of stakeholders.
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  19. Ann C. Dzuranin, Rebecca Toppe Shortridge & Pamela A. Smith (2013). Building Ethical Leaders: A Way to Integrate and Assess Ethics Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):101-114.
    The Building Ethical Leaders using an Integrated Ethics Framework (BELIEF) Program was introduced in 2006 at the Northern Illinois University College of Business. The Program was developed to support two learning objectives: (1) increase students’ awareness of ethical issues and (2) strengthen their decision-making abilities regarding these ethical issues. This article provides an overview of the development and integration of this Program. We also provide assessment data on our two learning objectives. The assessment measures improvement from 2005, before the implementation (...)
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  20. Loren Falkenberg & Jaana Woiceshyn (2008). Enhancing Business Ethics: Using Cases to Teach Moral Reasoning. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 79 (3):213 - 217.
    The growing trend of required ethics instruction in the business school curriculum has created a need for relevant teaching materials. In response to this need the Journal of Business Ethics is introducing a new case section. This section provides a forum for publishing and accessing a range of materials that can be used in teaching business ethics. This article discusses how business ethics cases can facilitate the development of deductive, inductive and critical reasoning skills.
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  21. Edward L. Felton & Ronald R. Sims (2005). Teaching Business Ethics: Targeted Outputs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):377 - 391.
    Business ethics is once again a hot topic as examples of improper business practices that violate commonly accepted ethical norms are brought to our attention. With the increasing number of scandals business schools find themselves on the defensive in explaining what they are doing to help respond to the call to teach ‘‘more’’ business ethics. This paper focuses on two issues germane to business ethics teaching efforts: the ‘‘targeted output’’ goals of teaching business ethics and when in the curriculum business (...)
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  22. Stewart D. Friedman (1996). Community Involvement Projects in Wharton's MBA Curriculum. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (1):95 - 101.
    This article describes the evolution of extra-mural team projects in the Wharton School's new MBA curriculum, emphasizing both the benefits of doing community service and the value these projects have in providing real work opportunities for learning teams; five- or six-person student groups that do collective tasks in Foundations of Leadership and other required courses throughout the first of a two-year program.
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  23. Frida Kerner Furman (1990). Teaching Business Ethics: Questioning the Assumptions, Seeking New Directions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1):31 - 38.
    An examination of leading textbooks suggests the predominance of a principle-based model in the teaching of business ethics. The model assumes that by teaching students the rudiments of ethical reasoning and ethical theory, we can hope to create rational, independent, autonomous managers who will apply such theory to the many quandary situations of the corporate world. This paper challenges these assumptions by asking the following questions: 1. Is the acquisition of principle-based ethical theory unproblematic? 2. What is the transferability of (...)
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  24. Jeffrey Gandz & Nadine Hayes (1988). Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (9):657 - 669.
    Business ethics should be taught in business schools as an integrated part of core curricula in MBA programs with a dual focus on both analytical frameworks and their applications to the business disciplines. To overcome the reluctance of many faculty to handle ethical issues, a critical mass of faculty must develop suitable materials, educate their peers in its use, and take the lead by introducing it in their own courses and on senior management programs.
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  25. Richard J. George (1987). Teaching Business Ethics: Is There a Gap Between Rhetoric and Reality? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 6 (7):513 - 518.
    In light of the continued erosion of business ethics in America, the ongoing question is what are the nation's business schools doing to prepare ethically responsible future leaders of industry and government? This paper reports the findings of a survey mailed to every program accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. The curriculum treatment of business ethics is identified at the undergraduate and the graduate levels in public as well as in private colleges and universities. In addition, (...)
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  26. Richard T. George (1987). The Status of Business Ethics: Past and Future. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 6 (3):201 - 211.
    Business ethics, which grew out of religion's interest in ethics in business and management education's concern with social issues, has become an interdisciplinary academic field. Thus far it has centered on teaching undergraduates. The easy work has now been done and the field has reached a plateau. To develop further it requires development on the MBA level, high quality research on new questions, positive models, better interdisciplinary integration, and attention to international business. Ultimately the field will stand or fall on (...)
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  27. Virginia W. Gerde & R. Spencer Foster (2008). X-Men Ethics: Using Comic Books to Teach Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):245 - 258.
    A modern form of narrative, comic books are used to communicate, discuss, and critique issues in business ethics and social issues in management. A description of comic books as a legitimate medium is followed by a discussion of the pedagogical uses of comic books and assessment techniques. The strengths of the pedagogy include crossing cultural barriers, understanding the complexity of individual decision-making and organizational influences, and the universality of dilemmas and values. We provide an initial source for educators on the (...)
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  28. Kevin Gibson (2003). Games Students Play: Incorporating the Prisoner's Dilemma in Teaching Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):53-64.
    The so-called "Prisoner''s Dilemma" is often referred to in business ethics, but probably not well understood. This article has three parts: (1) I claim that models derived from game theory are significant in the field for discussions of prudential ethics and the practical decisions managers make; (2) I discuss using them as a practical pedagogical exercise and some of the lessons generated; (3) more speculatively, I suggest that they are useful in discussions of corporate personhood.
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  29. Christine Wanjiru Gichure (2006). Teaching Business Ethics in Africa: What Ethical Orientation? The Case of East and Central Africa. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (1):39 - 52.
    This paper starts off from what seems to be a difficulty of ethics in African Business today. For several years now Transparency International has placed some African countries high on its list of most corrupt countries of the world. The conclusion one draws from this assessment is that either African culture has no regard or concern for ethics, or that there has been a gradual loss of the concept of the ethical and the moral in contemporary African society. Equally problematic (...)
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  30. Howard Harris (2008). Promoting Ethical Reflection in the Teaching of Business Ethics. Business Ethics 17 (4):379-390.
    A case study provides the basis for consideration of the purpose of business ethics teaching, the importance of reflection and the evaluation of ethics teaching. The way in which personal reflection and an increased capacity for ethical action can be encouraged and openly identified as aims of the course is discussed. The paper considers changes in the design and delivery of the international management ethics and values course taught at the University of South Australia as part of the undergraduate management (...)
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  31. Mary Hartog & Philip Frame (2005). Business Ethics in the Curriculum: Integrating Ethics Through Work Experience. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):399 - 409.
    In this paper we seek to make the case for a teaching and learning strategy that integrates business ethics in the curriculum, whilst not precluding a disciplines based approach to this subject. We do this in the context of specific work experience modules at undergraduate level which are offered by Middlesex University Business School, part of a modern university based in North West London. We firstly outline our educative values and then the modules that form the basis of our research. (...)
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  32. Richard Higginson & Geoff Moore (1994). FOCUS: Using a Computerised Game in Teaching Business Ethics. Business Ethics 3 (3):160–164.
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  33. LaRue Tone Hosmer (1999). Somebody Out There Doesn't Like Us: A Study of the Position and Respect of Business Ethics at Schools of Business Administration. Journal of Business Ethics 22 (2):91 - 106.
    This article is the result of a survey taken to determine the respect and position of Business Ethics as a field of study within Schools of Business Administration. 379 questionnaires were delivered to individual, not institutional, subscribers to Business Ethics Quarterly. 158 were filled out and returned, for a response rate of 41.6%. The general finding from an analysis of those responses is that many persons active in the teaching and research of Business Ethics at large (over 10000 students) and (...)
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  34. LaRue Tone Hosmer & Nicholas H. Steneck (1989). Teaching Business Ethics: The Use of Films and Videota. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (12):929 - 936.
    Audio-visual material is extremely useful in the teaching of Business Ethics, yet no bibliography of the commercially available films and videotapes seems to be available. We have prepared a formal listing, complete with titles, descriptions, sources, prices and a brief evaluation, and have explained our selection and use of this material.
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  35. Ellen J. Kennedy & Leigh Lawton (1992). Business Ethics in Fiction. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (3):187 - 195.
    Interest in teaching business ethics classes on college campuses has increased dramatically during the past decade. In the United States, virtually all graduate and undergraduate business programs teach business ethics in some form. While current pedagogy relies primarily on factual recounting of actual workplace incidents and actual and hypothetical case studies, calls for multidisciplinary approaches to teaching business ethics have not yet produced significant pedagogical change. We propose the use of fiction (novels, dramas, and short stories) to enrich current teaching (...)
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