About this topic
Summary Works by and about the seventeenth century Cambridge Platonists, including, Benjamin Whichcote, Henry More, Ralph Cudworth, John Smith, Peter Sterry, Nathaniel Culverwell, John Norris, Joseph Glanville, Anthony Ashley Cooper (Third Earl of Shaftesbury), and Anne Conway. 
  Show all references
Related categories
Siblings:See also:
219 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 219
  1. Richard Acworth (2009). The Philosophy of John Norris. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):874-878.
  2. Richard Acworth (1979). The Philosophy of John Norris of Bemerton: (1657-1712). Olms.
  3. Ernest Albee (1924). The Philosophy of Cudworth. Philosophical Review 33 (3):245-272.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alfred Owen Aldridge (1972). The Waning of the Renaissance 1640-1740. Studies in the Thought and Poetry of Henry More, John Norris and Isaac Watts. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (3):361-363.
  5. Keith Allen (2013). Cudworth on Mind, Body, and Plastic Nature. Philosophy Compass 8 (4):337-347.
    Ralph Cudworth (1617–1688) is a member of the group of philosophers and theologians commonly called ‘the Cambridge Platonists’. Although not part of the canon of great early modern philosophers, Cudworth’s work is of more than merely passing interest. Cudworth was an influential philosopher in the early modern period both for his criticisms of contemporaries like Hobbes, Descartes, and Spinoza, and for his own distinctive philosophical views. This entry focusses on Cudworth’s views on mind and body, considering both his criticisms of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Philip C. Almond (1993). Henry More and the Apocalypse. Journal of the History of Ideas 54 (2):189-200.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Philip C. Almond (1991). The Journey of the Soul in Seventeenth Century English Platonism. History of European Ideas 13 (6):775-791.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ruth Ap Roberts (forthcoming). Arnold and Cambridge Platonists. Clio.
    Matthew arnold maintains in the nineteenth century the renaissance school of the cambridge platonists. for them, reason and religion are by no means at odds: reason is in fact "the candle of the lord." for matthew arnold in "literature and dogma", christianity will prevail only by being shorn of its supernaturalist elements and set on its true rational ground. ernst cassirer has shown how the cambridge platonists bridge the gap between the italian renaissance and the german humanists of the "goethezeit", (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert L. Armstrong (1969). Cambridge Platonists and Locke on Innate Ideas. Journal of the History of Ideas 30:191-205.
    The cambridge platonists exemplify the fear that newtonian natural philosophy subverts the status of traditional moral and religious beliefs, Which are strongly supported by the innate idea doctrine since it justifies them independently of the senses and the material universe. Isaac barrow, Friend and teacher of newton, Also employs the doctrine approbatively to support his metaphysics as a science of basic principles that constitute the foundation of natural science. Locke's rejection of the doctrine is analyzed and it is suggested that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Eugene Munger Austin (1935). The Ethics of the Cambridge Platonists. Philadelphia.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Michael Ayers (ed.) (2007). Rationalism, Platonism, and God. Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press.
    Rationalism, Platonism and God comprises three main papers on Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz, with extensive responses. It provides a significant contribution to the exploration of the common ground of the great early-modern Rationalist theories, and an examination of the ways in which the mainstream Platonic tradition permeates these theories. -/- John Cottingham identifies characteristically Platonic themes in Descartes's cosmology and metaphysics, finding them associated with two distinct, even opposed attitudes to nature and the human condition, one ancient and 'contemplative', the (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. A. Babolin (1983). Science and Religious Belief Among the Cambridge Platonists. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 75 (1):76-86.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Albino Babolin (1994). Dai platonici di Cambridge a Joseph Butler. Ricerche sul pensiero religioso inglese nei secoli XVII e XVIII. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 86 (3):591.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John Tull Baker (1937). Henry More and Kant: A Note to the Second Argument on Space in the Transcendental Aesthetic. Philosophical Review 46 (3):298-306.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John Tull Baker (1930). An Historical and Critical Examination of English Space and Time Theories From Henry More to Bishop Berkeley. Bronxville, N.Y.,Sarah Lawrence College.
  16. M. Baldi (1997). Platonism and Scholastic Philosophy in the Theory of the Intelligible World Formulated by John Norris of Bemerton. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 52 (3):457-494.
  17. Marialuisa Baldi (forthcoming). Platonismo e “filosofia delle scuole” nella teoria del mondo intellegibile di John Norris of Bemerton. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Bernard H. Baumrin (1967). Platonism and Cartesianism in the Philosophy of Ralph Cudworth. Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (1):91-94.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Frederick C. Beiser (1996). The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment. Princeton University Press.
    The Sovereignty of Reason is a survey of the rule of faith controversy in seventeenth-century England. It examines the arguments by which reason eventually became the sovereign standard of truth in religion and politics, and how it triumphed over its rivals: Scripture, inspiration, and apostolic tradition. Frederick Beiser argues that the main threat to the authority of reason in seventeenth-century England came not only from dissident groups but chiefly from the Protestant theology of the Church of England. The triumph of (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David C. Bellusci (2013). Amor Dei in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Editions Rodopi.
    Amor Dei, “love of God” raises three questions: How do we know God is love? How do we experience love of God? How free are we to love God? This book presents three kinds of love, worldly, spiritual, and divine to understand God’s love. The work begins with Augustine’s Confessions highlighting his Manichean and Neoplatonic periods before his conversion to Christianity. Augustine’s confrontation with Pelagius anticipates the unresolved disputes concerning God’s love and free will. In the sixteenth-century the Italian humanist, (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Constance Blackwell (2011). Neo-Platonic Modes of Concordism Versus Definitions of Difference: Simplicius, Augustinus Steuco and Ralph Cudworth Versus Marco Antonio Zimara and Benedictus Pererius. In Stephen Clucas, Peter J. Forshaw & Valery Rees (eds.), Laus Platonici Philosophi: Marsilio Ficino and His Influence. Brill. 198--317.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Andreas Blank (2013). Fortunio Liceti on Mind, Light, and Immaterial Extension. Perspectives on Science 21 (3):358-378.
    In the history of seventeenth-century philosophy, the distinction between material and immaterial extension is closely associated with the Cambridge Platonist Henry More (1614–1687). The aspect of More’s conception of immaterial extension that proved most influential is his theory of absolute divine space. Very plausibly, the Newtonian conception of space owes a great deal to More’s views on space. More’s views on space in turn were closely linked to his views on the nature of individual spirits—the souls of brutes and humans, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Andreas Blank (2013). Henry More on Spirits, Light, and Immaterial Extension. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):857 - 878.
    According to the Cambridge Platonist Henry More, individual ?spirits? ? the souls of humans and non-human animals ? are extended but cannot be physically divided. His contemporaries and recent commentators have charged that More has never given an explication of the grounds on which the indivisibility of spirits is based. In this article, I suggest that exploring the usage that More makes of the analogy between spirits and light could go some way towards providing such an explication. More compares the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Michael Boylan (1980). Henry More's Space and the Spirit of Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (4):395-405.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. George Sidney Brett (1912/1998). A History of Psychology. Thoemmes Press.
    'the whole work is remarkably fresh, vivid and attractively written psychologists will be grateful that a work of this kind has been done ... by one who has the scholarship, science, and philosophical training that are requisite for the task' - Mind This renowned three-volume collection records chronologically the steps by which psychology developed from the time of the early Greek thinkers and the first writings on the nature of the mind, through to the 1920s and such modern preoccupations as (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jacqueline Broad, Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill : Science, Religion, and Witchcraft.
  27. Stuart Brown (1998). Back to the Texts. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (2):269 – 273.
    Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy: Series Editors, Karl Ameriks and Desmond M. Clarke. Ren Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy with Selections from the Objections and Replies . Translated and edited by John Cottingham. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. xlvi + 120. 25., 7.95 pb. ISBN 0-521-55252-4 (hb.). ISBN 0-521-55818-2 (pb.). Ralph Cudworth, A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality with A Treatise of Freewill . Edited by Sarah Hutton. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. xxxvi + 218. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Stuart Brown (ed.) (1995). Routledge History of Philosophy Volume V: British Empiricism and the Enlightenment. Routledge.
    European philosophy from the late seventeenth century through most of the eighteenth is broadly conceived as `the Enlightenment', the period of empirical reaction to the great seventeenth century Rationalists. This volume begins with Herbert of Cherbury and the Cambridge Platonists and with Newton and the early English Enlightenment. Locke is a key figure in late chapters, as a result of his importance both in the development of British and Irish philosophy and because of his seminal influence in the Enlightenment as (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Stuart C. Brown (ed.) (1996). British Philosophy and the Age of Enlightenment. Routledge.
    European philosophy from the late seventeenth century through most of the eighteenth is broadly conceived as the "Enlightenment," a period of empricist reaction to the great seventeeth century Rationalists. This volume begins with Herbert of Cherbury and the Cambridge Platonists and with Newton and the early English Enlightenment. Locke is a key figure, as a result of his importance both in the development of British and Irish philosophy and because of his seminal influence in the Enlightenment as a whole. British (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Meyrick H. Carré (1953). Ralph Cudworth. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (13):342-351.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Benjamin Carter (2011). 'The Little Commonwealth of Man': The Trinitarian Origins of the Ethical and Political Philosophy of Ralph Cudworth. Peeters.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Benjamin Carter (2010). Ralph Cudworth and the Theological Origins of Consciousness. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):29-47.
    The English Neoplatonic philosopher Ralph Cudworth introduced the term ‘consciousness’ into the English philosophical lexicon. Cudworth uses the term to define the form and structure of cognitive acts, including acts of freewill. In this article I highlight the important role of theological disputes over the place and extent of human freewill within an overarching system of providence. Cudworth’s intellectual development can be understood in the main as an increasingly detailed and nuanced reaction to the strict voluntarist Calvinism that is typified (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Benjamin Carter (2009). Ralph Cudworth. In Graham Robert Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The History of Western Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 3--113.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Benjamin Carter (2006). Cambridge Platonist Spirituality. Faith and Philosophy 23 (3):361-363.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ernst Cassirer (1953/1970). The Platonic Renaissance in England. New York,Gordian Press.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Leonora D. Cohen (1936). Descartes and Henry More on the Beast-Machine—A Translation of Their Correspondence Pertaining to Animal Automatism. Annals of Science 1 (1):48-61.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. James G. Colbert (1992). El Conocimiento Divino En John Smith. Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 9:87-96.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. James Collins (1970). From Puritanism to Platonism in Seventeenth Century England. By James D. Roberts. The Modern Schoolman 47 (2):254-255.
  39. Yannis Constantinidès (2011). Makers and Heirs of the Enlightenment. The Cambridge Platonists Mirrored by Joseph de Maistre / Philippe Barthelet ; Maistre's Rousseaus / Carolina Armenteros ; Two Great Enemies of the Enlightenment : Joseph de Maistre and Schopenhauer. In Carolina Armenteros & Richard Lebrun (eds.), Joseph de Maistre and the Legacy of Enlightenment. Voltaire Foundation.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jackson I. Cope (1956). Joseph Glanvill, Anglican Apologist. St. Louis,[Committee on Publications, Washington University].
  41. Brian P. Copenhaver (2006). Jewish Theologies of Space in the Scientific Revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and Their Predecessors. Annals of Science 37 (5):489-548.
    (1980). Jewish theologies of space in the scientific revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and their predecessors. Annals of Science: Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 489-548.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Allison Coudert (1998). The Enthusiastical Concerns of Dr. Henry More: Religious Meaning and the Psychology of Delusion (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (3):467-468.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Allison Coudert (1994). The Conway Letters: The Correspondence of Anne, Viscountess Conway, Henry More, and Their Friends, 1642-1684 (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):308-309.
  44. Gerald R. Cragg (ed.) (1968/1985). The Cambridge Platonists. University Press of America.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Claire Crignon de Oliveira (2008). Enthousiasme et sorcellerie chez Henry More et Joseph Glanvill : les limites de la critique de l'enthousiasme. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 3 (3):323-335.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. R. Crocker (1999). Daniel C. Fouke: The Enthusiastical Concerns of Dr Henry More: Religious Meaning and the Psychology of Delusion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7:523-525.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ralph Cudworth (1996/1976). A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality. Cambridge University Press.
    Ralph Cudworth (1617-1688) deserves recognition as one of the most important English seventeenth-century philosophers after Hobbes and Locke. In opposition to Hobbes, Cudworth proposes an innatist theory of knowledge which may be contrasted with the empirical position of his younger contemporary Locke, and in moral philosophy he anticipates the ethical rationalists of the eighteenth century. A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality is his most important work, and this volume makes it available, together with his shorter Treatise of Freewill, in (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ralph Cudworth (1968). Sermon Preached Before the Honorable House of Commons. In Gerald R. Cragg (ed.), The Cambridge Platonists. University Press of America. 387--8.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Ralph Cudworth (1845/1995). The True Intellectual System of the Universe. Thoemmes Press.
    83 The SHIP-MASTER'S ASSISTANT, and OWNER'S MA- NUAL ; containing general Information necessary for Merchants, Owners, and Masters of Ships, Officers, ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Ralph Cudworth (1838/1992). A Treatise of Freewill and an Introduction to Cudworth's Treatise. Routledge/Thoemmes Press.
1 — 50 / 219