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  1. John Aldrich (2006). When Are Inferences Too Fragile to Be Believed? Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):161-177.
    The use of sensitivity analysis is routine in some fields of empirical econometrics, although econometric theorists have generally taken a critical attitude towards it. This paper presents a framework in which arguments for and against such analysis can be evaluated. It appears that sensitivity is not necessarily a bad, nor sturdiness necessarily a good.
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  2. J. Birner (1995). Interpretation and its Consequences: A Review of Don Lavoie's (Editor) Expectations and the Meaning of Institutions-Essays by Ludwig Lachmann and Economics and Hermeneutics. [REVIEW] Journal of Economic Methodology 2:304-311.
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  3. Jack Birner, Peter Boettke, Karen Vaughn & Ulrich Witt (1998). INEM Sessions at the New York ASSA Meetings 3-5 January 1999. Journal of Economic Methodology 5 (2):332.
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  4. Nancy Cartwright (2010). Reply to Steel and Pearl Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics , Nancy Cartwright. Cambridge University Press, 2008, X + 270 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):87-94.
  5. Hsiang-Ke Chao, Szu-Ting Chen & Roberta L. Millstein (2013). Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics. Springer.
    This volume addresses fundamental issues in the philosophy of science in the context of two most intriguing fields: biology and economics. Written by authorities and experts in the philosophy of biology and economics, Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics provides a structured study of the concepts of mechanism and causality in these disciplines and draws careful juxtapositions between philosophical apparatus and scientific practice. By exploring the issues that are most salient to the contemporary philosophies of biology and economics and (...)
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  6. Hsiang-Ke Chao, Szu-Ting Chen & Roberta L. Millstein (2013). Towards the Methodological Turn in the Philosophy of Science. In Hsiang-Ke Chao, Szu-Ting Chen & Roberta L. Millstein (eds.), Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics. Springer.
    This chapter provides an introduction to the study of the philosophical notions of mechanisms and causality in biology and economics. This chapter sets the stage for this volume, Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics, in three ways. First, it gives a broad review of the recent changes and current state of the study of mechanisms and causality in the philosophy of science. Second, consistent with a recent trend in the philosophy of science to focus on scientific practices, it in (...)
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  7. Hsiang‐Ke Chao (2005). A Misconception of the Semantic Conception of Econometrics? Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (1):125-135.
    Davis argues that Suppe's semantic conception provides a better understanding of the problem of theory?data confrontations. Applying his semantic methodology to the LSE (London School of Economics) approach of econometrics, he concludes that the LSE approach fails to address the issue of bridging the theory?data gap. This paper suggests two other versions of the semantic view of theories in the philosophy of science, due to Suppes and van Fraassen, and argues that the LSE approach can be construed under these two (...)
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  8. Victoria Chick & Sheila Dow (2005). The Meaning of Open Systems. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (3):363-381.
    There has been considerable discussion lately of the concept of open systems, which has revealed that different participants are using the terms ?openness? and ?closure? in different ways. The purpose of this paper is to address issues of meaning that arise in this particular discourse, with a view to clarifying both conflicts in usage and the underlying issues involved. We explore the different meanings of openness and closure extant in the literature, as applied at the ontological and epistemological levels, focusing (...)
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  9. D. Colander (1997). Review of Thomas A. Boylan and Paschal F. O'Gorman's Beyond Rhetoric Methodology. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 13 (1):140-141.
  10. Steven Cook (1999). Methodological Aspects of the Encompassing Principle. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (1):61-78.
    The philosophy of science literature has played an increasing role in discussion of econometric methodology in recent years, and the Hendry methodology in particular has received much attention. Despite this, the encompassing principle has been overlooked in the methodological literature. This paper addresses this by examining the major methodological implications of the principle.
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  11. John B. Davis (1995). Personal Identity and Standard Economic Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (1):35-52.
    This paper investigates the topic of personal identity in standard neoclassical theory. It looks first at the traditional utility theory of maximizing consumers and then at the extension of that analysis in the time-allocation-household-production model to see how relatively settled ontological commitments in the neoclassical research program undergo modification with its development. David Hume's skeptical treatment of personal identity is employed to assess the traditional view. The time-allocation model is shown to escape some of Hume's problems, but encounters difficulties of (...)
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  12. C. Tyler DesRoches (2009). Revitalizing Causality: Realism About Causality in Philosophy and Social Science. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (4):426-431.
  13. M. Hammersley (2011). On Becker's Studies of Marijuana Use as an Example of Analytic Induction. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (4):535-566.
    Analytic induction (AI) is an interpretation of scientific method that emerged in early twentieth-century sociology and still has some influence today. Among the studies often cited as examples are Becker’s articles on marijuana use. While these have been given less attention than the work of Lindesmith on opiate addiction and Cressey on financial trust violation, Becker’s work has distinctive features. Furthermore, it raises some important and interesting issues that relate not only to AI but to social scientific explanation more generally. (...)
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  14. Daniel Hausman (2001). Explanation and diagnosis in economics. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:311-326.
  15. Carsten Herrmann-Pillath (2012). Institutions, Distributed Cognition and Agency: Rule-Following as Performative Action. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (1):21-42.
    Aoki recently proposed the concept of substantive institutions, a concept that relates the outcomes of strategic interaction with public representations of the equilibrium states of games. I argue that the Aoki model can be grounded in theories of distributed cognition and performativity, which I put into the context of Searle's philosophical account of institutions. Substantive institutions build on regularized causal interactions between internal neuronal mechanisms and external facts, shared in a population of agents. Following Searle's proposal of conceiving rule-following as (...)
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  16. Frank Hindriks (2011). Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization, John R. Searle, Oxford University Press, 2010, 224 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):338-346.
  17. Frank Hindriks (2008). False Models as Explanatory Engines. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (3):334-360.
    Many models in economics are very unrealistic. At the same time, economists put a lot of effort into making their models more realistic. I argue that in many cases, including the Modigliani-Miller irrelevance theorem investigated in this paper, the purpose of this process of concretization is explanatory. When evaluated in combination with their assumptions, a highly unrealistic model may well be true. The purpose of relaxing an unrealistic assumption, then, need not be to move from a false model to a (...)
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  18. Geoffrey M. Hodgson (2004). Darwinism, Causality and the Social Sciences. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (2):175-194.
    Recently the degree to which ?evolutionary economics? does or should involve Darwinian principles has come under debate. This essay builds on previous arguments that Darwinism has a potentially wide application to socioeconomic evolution, which does not involve biological reductionism. It is argued that at the core of Darwinism are presuppositions concerning causality and causal explanation. Contrary to widespread belief, these presuppositions do not downgrade or ignore human intentionality: they simply require that it too is in principle subject to causal explanation. (...)
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  19. Geoffrey M. Hodgson (2001). Darwin, Veblen and the Problem of Causality in Economics. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (3/4):385 - 423.
    This article discusses some of the ways in which Darwinism has influenced a small minority of economists. It is argued that Darwinism involves a philosophical as well as a theoretical doctrine. Despite claims to the contrary, the uses of analogies to Darwinian natural selection theory are highly limited in economics. Exceptions include Thorstein Veblen, Richard Nelson, and Sidney Winter. At the philosophical level, one of the key features of Darwinism is its notion of detailed understanding in terms of chains of (...)
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  20. K. D. Hoover (2002). If Causation is Not Correlation, What is It? A Review of Daniel M. Hausman's Causal Asymmetries. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):235-240.
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  21. Kevin D. Hoover (1990). Nature's Capacities and Their Measurement, Nancy Cartwright. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989, X + 268 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):309-.
  22. Kevin D. Hoover (1990). The Logic of Causal Inference. Economics and Philosophy 6:207-234.
    Discontented people might talk of corruption in the Commons, closeness in the Commons and the necessity of reforming the Commons, said Mr. Spenlow solemnly, in conclusion; but when the price of wheat per bushel had been the highest, the Commons had been the busiest; and a man might lay his hand upon his heart, and say this to the whole world, – ‘Touch the Commons, and down comes the country!’.
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  23. Cyril Höschl (1999). Is There Causality in History? In I. C. Jarvie & Sandra Pralong (eds.), Popper's Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper. Routledge.
  24. William A. Jackson (2002). Functional Explanation in Economics: A Qualified Defence. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):169-189.
    Economists seldom make explicit use of functional explanation, although they sometimes use it implicitly. Functional theorizing has lost favour among social scientists in recent years, and few are now willing to adopt functional language. This paper argues that, despite some drawbacks, explicit functional methods have several attractive features, including a pluralistic attitude to causality, an awareness of stratification and emergence, and a compatibility with a realist perspective. Functional methods on their own cannot provide full causal explanations, but they can raise (...)
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  25. Donald W. Katzner & Peter Skott (2004). Economic Explanation, Ordinality and the Adequacy of Analytic Specification. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (4):437-453.
    This paper examines the implicit links between models containing ordinal variables and their underlying unquantified counterparts that are necessary to make the former viable theoretical constructions. It is argued that when the underlying unquantified structure is unknown, the permissible transformations of scale applicable to the ordinal variables have to be restricted beyond that which is permitted by dint of the ordinality itself. The possibility of an underlying structure being known but unspecified is also considered. In the case of the efficiency (...)
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  26. Harold Kincaid (2003). The Dappled World: A Study of the Boundaries of Science, Nancy Cartwright. Cambridge University Press, 1999, IX + 240 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 19 (1):167-170.
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  27. Jaakko Kuorikoski (2011). Variations in Causal Reasoning Causality and Causal Modelling in the Social Sciences: Measuring Variations. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):301-305.
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  28. Tony Lawson (2004). Reorienting Economics: On Heterodox Economics, Themata and the Use of Mathematics in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):329-340.
  29. Stephen F. LeRoy (2002). Causality: Models, Reasoning and Inference A Review of Judea Pearl's Causality. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (1):100-102.
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  30. Alessio Moneta (2005). Causality in Macroeconometrics: Some Considerations About Reductionism and Realism. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (3):433-453.
    This paper investigates the varieties of reductionism and realism about causal relations in macroeconometrics. There are two issues, which are kept distinct in the analysis but which are interrelated in the development of econometrics. The first one is the question of the reducibility of causal relations to regularities, measured in statistics by correlations. The second one is the question of the reducibility of causes among macroeconomic aggregates to microeconomic behaviour. It is argued that there is a continuum of possible positions (...)
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  31. Alessio Moneta & Federica Russo (2014). Causal Models and Evidential Pluralism in Econometrics. Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (1):54-76.
  32. Judea Pearl (2010). Nancy Cartwright on Hunting Causes Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics , Nancy Cartwright. Cambridge University Press, 2008, X + 270 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):69-77.
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  33. Judea Pearl (2003). Reply to Woodward. Economics and Philosophy 19 (2):341-344.
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  34. Julian Reiss (2013). The Explanation Paradox Redux. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (3):280 - 292.
    I respond to some challenges raised by my critics. In particular, I argue in favour of six claims. First, against Alexandrova and Northcott, I point out that to deny the explanatoriness of economic models by assuming an ontic (specifically, causal) conception of explanation is to beg the question. Second, against defences of causal realism (by Hausman, Mäki, Rol and Grüne-Yanoff) I point out that they have provided no criterion to distinguish those claims a model makes that can be interpreted realistically (...)
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  35. Julian Reiss (2012). The Explanation Paradox. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (1):43-62.
    This paper examines mathematical models in economics and observes that three mutually inconsistent hypotheses concerning models and explanation are widely held: (1) economic models are false; (2) economic models are nevertheless explanatory; and (3) only true accounts explain. Commentators have typically resolved the paradox by rejecting either one of these hypotheses. I will argue that none of the proposed resolutions work and conclude that therefore the paradox is genuine and likely to stay.
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  36. Julian Reiss (2001). Natural Economic Quantities and Their Measurement. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (2):287-311.
    This paper discusses and develops an important distinction drawn by Jevons, viz . that between natural and fictitious quantities. This distinction provides a basis for a theory of economic concept formation that aims at picking out families of models that are phenomenally adequate, explanatory and exact simultaneously. Essentially, the theory demands of an economic quantity to be natural that (1) it is explained by a causal model, (2) it is measurable and (3) the measurement procedure is justified. The proposed theory (...)
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  37. Ole Rogeberg & Hans Olav Melberg (2011). Acceptance of Unsupported Claims About Reality: A Blind Spot in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (01):29-52.
    Do economists accept absurd and unsupported claims about reality, and if so, why? We define four types of claims commonly made in economics that require different types of evidence, and show examples of each from the rational addiction literature. Claims about real world causal mechanisms and welfare effects seem poorly supported. A survey mailed to all researchers with peer-reviewed work on rational addiction theory provides some evidence that criteria for evaluating claims of pure theory and statistical prediction are better (...)
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  38. Menno Rol (2013). Reply to Julian Reiss. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (3):244 - 249.
    Julian Reiss finds an insoluble paradox in the claims that economic models are at the same time false, nevertheless explanatory, and that only true explanations explain. But the claim that they are false is itself false. A closer look at what ?truth? may mean is needed.
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  39. Aris Spanos (2006). Revisiting the Omitted Variables Argument: Substantive Vs. Statistical Adequacy. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):179-218.
    The problem of omitted variables is commonly viewed as a statistical misspecification issue which renders the inference concerning the influence of X t on yt unreliable, due to the exclusion of certain relevant factors W t . That is, omitting certain potentially important factors W t may confound the influence of X t on yt . The textbook omitted variables argument attempts to assess the seriousness of this unreliability using the sensitivity of the estimator to the inclusion/exclusion of W t (...)
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  40. Peter Spirtes (2005). Graphical Models, Causal Inference, and Econometric Models. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (1):3-34.
    A graphical model is a graph that represents a set of conditional independence relations among the vertices (random variables). The graph is often given a causal interpretation as well. I describe how graphical causal models can be used in an algorithm for constructing partial information about causal graphs from observational data that is reliable in the large sample limit, even when some of the variables in the causal graph are unmeasured. I also describe an algorithm for estimating from observational data (...)
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  41. Naftali Weinberger (2014). Evidence-Based Policy: A Practical Guide to Doing It Better, Nancy Cartwright and Jeremy Hardie. Oxford University Press, 2013, Ix + 196 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 30 (1):113-120.
  42. Altug Yalcintas (2011). A Review Essay on David Laibman's Deep History: A Study in Social Evolution and Human Potential. Journal of Philosophical Economics 5 (1):168-182.
    The frequency of historical materialist explanations in evolutionary social sciences is very low even though historical materialism and evolutionism have great many shared aims towards explaining the long term social change. David Laibman in his Deep History (2007) picks up some of the standard questions of evolutionary social theory and aims at advancing the conception of historical materialism so as to develop a Marxist theory of history from an evolutionary point of view. The contribution of Laibman’s work is to show (...)
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