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  1. M. L. Albert, R. Silverberg, A. Reches & M. Berman (1976). Cerebral Dominance for Consciousness. Archives of Neurology 33:453-4.
  2. Glenn Austin, W. Hayward & S. Rouhe (1974). A Note on the Problem of Conscious Man and Cerebral Disconnection by Hemispherectomy. In Marcel Kinsbourne & W. Smith (eds.), Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function. Charles C.
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  3. A. Battro (2001). Half a Brain is Enough: The Story of Nico. Cambridge University Press.
    Half a Brain is Enough is the extraordinary story of Nico, a three-year-old boy who was given a right hemispherectomy to control his severe intractable epilepsy...
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  4. K. Baynes & Michael S. Gazzaniga (2000). Consciousness, Introspection, and the Split-Brain: The Two Minds/One Body Problem. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. Mit Press.
  5. J. Graham Beaumont (1981). Split Brain Studies and the Duality of Consciousness. In G. Underwood & R. Stevens (eds.), Aspects of Consciousness, Volume 2. Academic Press.
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  6. J. Graham Beaumont (1974). Handedness and Hemisphere Function. In S. J. Dimond & J. Graham Beaumont (eds.), Hemisphere Function in the Human Brain. Elek. 89--20.
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  7. Derek Besner (1981). Deep Dyslexia and the Right-Hemisphere Hypothesis: What's Left? Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (4):176-178.
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  8. Colin Blakemore & Susan A. Greenfield (1987). Mindwaves: Thoughts on Intelligence, Identity, and Consciousness. Blackwell.
  9. Joseph E. Bogen (1977). Further Discussion of Split Brains and Hemispheric Capabilities. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 28 (September):281-6.
  10. Joseph E. Bogen (1968). The Other Side of the Brain: An Appositional Mind. Bulletin of the Los Angeles Neurological Society 34:135-62.
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  11. S. Campbell & B. Keith (2006). Language in the Nondominant Hemisphere. In Keith Brown (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier. 529--536.
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  12. Mary K. Colvin & Michael S. Gazzaniga (2007). Split-Brain Cases. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
  13. B. Cucchiara, S. E. Kasner, D. A. Wolk, P. D. Lyden, V. A. Knappertz, T. Ashwood, T. Odergren & A. Nordlund (2003). Lack of Hemispheric Dominance for Consciousness in Acute Ischaemic Stroke. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 74 (7):889-892.
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  14. L. Dewitt (1975). Consciousness, Mind, Self: The Implications of the Split-Brain Studies. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 27 (March):41-47.
  15. S. J. Dimond (1978). Depletion of Awareness and Double-Simultaneous Stimulation in Split-Brain Man. Cortex 14:604-607.
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  16. S. J. Dimond & J. Graham Beaumont (eds.) (1974). Hemisphere Function in the Human Brain. Elek.
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  17. Stuart J. Dimond (1971). Hemisphere Function and Word Registration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (2):183.
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  18. John C. Eccles (ed.) (1966). Brain and Conscious Experience. Springer.
  19. C. el-Ojeili (forthcoming). Book Review: The Left Hemisphere: Mapping Critical Theory Today. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven.
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  20. Jillian H. Fecteau, Alan Kingstone & James T. Enns (2004). Hemisphere Differences in Conscious and Unconscious Word Reading. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):550-64.
    Hemisphere differences in word reading were examined using explicit and implicit processing measures. In an inclusion task, which indexes both conscious and unconscious word reading processes, participants were briefly presented with a word in either the right or the left visual field and were asked to use this word to complete a three-letter word stem. In an exclusion task, which estimates unconscious word reading, participants completed the word stem with any word other than the prime word. Experiment 1 showed that (...)
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  21. Alexander A. Fingelkurts & ANdrew A. Fingelkurts (2014). Altered Structure of Dynamic Electroencephalogram Oscillatory Pattern in Major Depression. Biological Psychiatry:in press.
    Research on electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) has accumulated diverse neurophysiologic findings related to the content, topography, neurochemistry, and functions of EEG oscillations. Significant progress has been made since the first landmark EEG study on affective disorders by Davidson 35 years ago. A systematic account of these data is important and necessary for building a consistent neuropsychophysiologic model of MDD and other affective disorders. Given the extensive data on frequency-dependent functional significance of EEG oscillations, a frequency (...)
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  22. Guido Gainotti (2005). Emotions, Unconscious Processes, and the Right Hemisphere. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 7 (1):71-81.
  23. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (2000). The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press.
    The majority of the chapters in this edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences are new, and those from the first edition have been completely rewritten and updated ...
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  24. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (1995). The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  25. Michael S. Gazzaniga (1995). Consciousness and the Cerebral Hemispheres. In , The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press.
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  26. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (1979). Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology. , Volume 2.
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  27. Michael S. Gazzaniga (1977). On Dividing the Self: Speculations From Brain Research. Excerpta Medica 434:233-44.
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  28. Michael S. Gazzaniga, J. E. LeDoux & David H. Wilson (1977). Language, Praxis, and the Right Hemisphere: Clues to Some Mechanisms of Consciousness. Neurology 27:1144-1147.
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  29. Michael S. Gazzaniga & Melvin E. Miller (2000). Testing Tulving: The Split Brain Approach. In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
  30. A. Harrington (1985). Nineteenth-Century Ideas on Hemisphere Differences and "Duality of Mind". Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):617-660.
    It is widely felt that the sorts of ideas current in modern laterality and split-brain research are largely without precedent in the behavioral and brain sciences. This paper not only challenges that view, but makes a first attempt to define the relevance of older concepts and data to present research programs.
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  31. Henry Hecaen (1969). Aphasic, Apraxic and Agnosic Syndromes in Right and Left Hemisphere Lesions. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland. 4--291.
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  32. R. Joseph (1988). The Right Cerebral Hemisphere: Emotion, Music, Visual-Spatial Skills, Body-Image, Dreams, and Awareness. Journal of Clinical Psychology 44:630-673.
  33. V. Kavcic, R. Fei, S. Hu & R. W. Doty (2000). Hemispheric Interaction, Metacontrol, and Mnemonic Processing in Split-Brain Macaques. Behavioural Brain Research 111:71-82.
  34. Julian Paul Keenan, Jennifer Rubio, Connie Racioppi, Amanda Johnson & Allyson Barnacz (2005). The Right Hemisphere and the Dark Side of Consciousness. Cortex. Special Issue 41 (5):695-704.
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  35. Marcel Kinsbourne & W. Smith (eds.) (1974). Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function. Charles C.
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  36. G. Kurian & K. Santhakumari (1990). Consciousness and the Left Cerebral Hemisphere. Journal of Indian Psychology 8:33-36.
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  37. Theodor Landis, R. E. Graves & H. Goodglass (1981). Dissociated Awareness of Manual Performance on Two Different Visual Associative Tasks: A "Split-Brain" Phenomenon in Normal Subjects? Cortex 17:435-440.
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  38. J. E. LeDoux (1986). Brain, Mind, and Language. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Brain and Mind. Methuen.
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  39. J. E. LeDoux, David H. Wilson & Michael S. Gazzaniga (1979). Beyond Commissurotomy: Clues to Consciousness. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology. , Volume 2.
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  40. J. E. LeDoux, David H. Wilson & Michael S. Gazzaniga (1977). A Divided Mind: Observations of the Conscious Properties of the Separated Hemispheres. Annals of Neurology 2:417-21.
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  41. W. A. Lishman (1971). Emotion, Consciousness, and Will After Brain Bisection in Man. Cortex 7:181-92.
  42. Donald M. Mackay (1987). Divided Brains -- Divided Minds? In Colin Blakemore & Susan A. Greenfield (eds.), Mindwaves. Blackwell.
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  43. Tom Manly, Veronika B. Dobler, Christopher M. Dodds & Melanie A. George (2005). Rightward Shift in Spatial Awareness with Declining Alertness. Neuropsychologia 43 (12):1721-1728.
  44. V. Mark (1996). Conflicting Communication in a Split-Brain Patient: Support for Dual Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press. 189--196.
  45. Charles E. Marks (1980). Commissurotomy, Consciousness, and Unity of Mind. MIT Press.
  46. L. Miller (1986). Some Comments on Cerebral Hemispheric Models of Consciousness. Psychoanalytic Review 73:129-44.
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  47. Alain Morin (2005). Self-Awareness and the Left Hemisphere: The Dark Side of Selectively Reviewing the Literature. Cortex 41:695-704.
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  48. Alain Morin (2002). Right Hemispheric Self-Awareness: A Critical Assessment. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):396-401.
    In this commentaryI evaluate the claim made byKeenan, Nelson, OÕConnor, and Pascual-Leone (2001) that since self-recognition results from right hemispheric activity, self-awareness too is likely to be produced by the activity of the same hemisphere. This reasoning is based on the assumption that self-recognition represents a valid operationalization of self-awareness; I present two views that challenge this rationale. Keenan et al. also support their claim with published evidence relating brain activityand self-awareness; I closelyexamine their analysis of one specific review of (...)
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  49. Alain Morin (2001). The Split-Brain Debate Revisited: On the Importance of Language and Self-Recognition for Right Hemispheric Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (2):107-118.
    In this commentary I use recent empirical evidence and theoretical analyses concerning the importance of language and the meaning of self-recognition to reevaluate the claim that the right mute hemisphere in commissurotomized patients possesses a full consciousness. Preliminary data indicate that inner speech is deeply linked to self-awareness; also, four hypotheses concerning the crucial role inner speech plays in self-focus are presented. The legitimacy of self-recognition as a strong operationalization of self-awareness in the right hemisphere is also questioned on the (...)
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  50. Thomas Natsoulas (1995). Consciousness and Commissurotomy: VI. Evidence for Normal Dual Consciousness? Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (2):181-206.
    This article addresses the problem of evidence for Puccetti's hypothesis of normal dual consciousness, i.e., the hypothesis that a stream of consciousness flows in each cerebral hemisphere when both are functioning normally in intact, healthy people. Evidence counts as supportive only if it is not explainable by a certain close alternative hypothesis that holds consciousness to proceed in the nondominant hemisphere only when the dominant hemisphere is unable to inhibit it . From this perspective, I discuss two experiments involving anesthesia (...)
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