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  1. Susan Blake (2009). Wang, Xiaobo 王曉波, Dao and Fa: Explanation and Analysis of Legalist Thought and Huang-Lao Philosophy 道與法 : 法家思想和黃老哲學解析. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):353-356.
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  2. Andrew Brennan & Ruiping Fan (2007). Autonomy and Interdependence: A Dialogue Between Liberalism and Confucianism. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):511–535.
  3. David Chai (2013). Wang, Weiwei 王威威, A Study of Hanfeizi's Thought: Taking Huanglao as the Root 韩非思想研究: 以黄老为本. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):137-139.
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  4. Chung-Ying Cheng (2011). Preface: Understanding Legalism in Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):1-3.
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  5. Chung-Ying Cheng (1981). Legalism Versus Confucianism: A Philosophical Appraisal. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (3):271-302.
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  6. Herrlee G. Creel (1974). Shen Pu-Hai: A Secular Philosopher of Administration. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 1 (2):119-136.
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  7. Markus Fischer (2012). The Book of Lord Shang Compared with Machiavelli and Hobbes. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):201-221.
  8. T'ang Hsiao-Wen (1976). Why is Hsün Tzu Called A Legalist? Contemporary Chinese Thought 8 (1):21-35.
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  9. Sung-Peng Hsu (1977). Two Kinds of Changes in Laotzu's Thought. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (4):329-355.
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  10. Yang Jung-Kuo (1976). Pre-Ch'in Confucian and Legalist Thought is Fundamentally Antagonistic. Contemporary Chinese Thought 7 (4):4-20.
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  11. Karyn Lai (2008). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This comprehensive introductory textbook to early Chinese philosophy covers a range of philosophical traditions which arose during the Spring and Autumn (722-476 BCE) and Warring States (475-221 BCE) periods in China, including Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism. It considers concepts, themes and argumentative methods of early Chinese philosophy and follows the development of some ideas in subsequent periods, including the introduction of Buddhism into China. The book examines key issues and debates in early Chinese philosophy, cross-influences between its traditions and (...)
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  12. K. K. Lee (1975). The Legalist School and Legal Positivism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (1):23-56.
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  13. Li Ma (2000). A Comparison of the Legitimacy of Power Between Confucianist and Legalist Philosophies. Asian Philosophy 10 (1):49-59.
    The concept of legitimacy is at the heart of the theory of power. It is essential to understand how a political power is built and how obedience is obtained among the population. We examine here the legitimacy of power for two of the most important political philosophies of classical China: Confucianism and Legalism. We show how a specific group of the population, the scholar-officials, play a specialised role in the two systems, acting as a legitimisation group. We further compare rites (...)
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  14. Fan Pai-Ch'uan (1979). Was the Revolution of 1911 the Struggle Between Confucians and Legalists? Contemporary Chinese Thought 11 (2):40-54.
  15. R. P. Peerenboom (1990). Natural Law in the "Huang-Lao Boshu&Quot;. Philosophy East and West 40 (3):309-329.
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  16. Henrique Schneider (2011). Legalism: Chinese-Style Constitutionalism? Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):46-63.
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  17. Henrique Schneider (2008). Legalism as Legal Positivism? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 40:163-168.
    The Rule of law often is considered to be a criterion for legal positivistic thinking. According to this maxim: can the Chinese Legalistic thinking of Shang Yang and Han Fei be considered as a sort of Legal Positivism? There are many positions shared by both, like the idea of a positive law or the binding character of the law despite of person and sympathies or even the concept of the law as a system. There is, however a important difference between (...)
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  18. Yang Shang (1928). The Book of Lord Shang. London, A. Probsthain.
    Shang, Yang. The Book of Lord Shang. A Classic of the Chinese School of Law. Translated from the Chinese with Introduction and Notes by Dr. J.J.L. Duyvendak.
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  19. Steven Shankman (2002). The Legalist Betrayal of the Confucian Other : Sima Qian's Portrayal of Qin Shihuangdi. In Steven Shankman & Massimo Lollini (eds.), Who, Exactly, is the Other ?: Western and Transcultural Perspectives: A Collection of Essays. University of Oregon Books/University of Oregon Humanities Center.
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  20. Chin Sheng-Hsi (1976). The Debate Between the Confucianists and the Legalists Over the Question of Ancient History During the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period. Contemporary Chinese Thought 7 (3):57-77.
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  21. Aat Vervoorn (1981). Taoism, Legalism and the Quest for Order in Warring States China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (3):303-324.
  22. Helmolt Vittinghoff (2001). Chapter 5: Legalism/Legism (Fajia) and Legalist/Legist Teachings. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (1&2):151–159.
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Hanfeizi
  1. Tongdong Bai (2011). Preliminary Remarks: Han Fei Zi—First Modern Political Philosopher? Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):4-13.
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  2. Alejandro Bárcenas (2013). Han Fei's Enlightened Ruler. Asian Philosophy 23 (3):236-259.
    In this essay I revise, based on the notion of the ‘enlightened ruler’ or mingzhu and his critique of the literati of his time, the common belief that Han Fei was an amoralist and an advocate of tyranny. Instead, I will argue that his writings are dedicated to advising those who ought to rule in order to achieve the goal of a peaceful and stable society framed by laws in accordance with the dao.
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  3. Alejandro Bárcenas (2012). Xunzi and Han Fei on Human Nature. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):135-148.
    It is commonly accepted that Han Fei studied under Xunzi sometime during the late third century BCE. However, there is surprisingly little dedicated to the in-depth study of the relationship between Xunzi’s ideas and one of his best-known followers. In this essay I argue that Han Fei’s notion of xing, commonly translated as human nature, was not only influenced by Xunzi but also that it is an important feature of his political philosophy.
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  4. Roger Boesche (2005). Han Feizi's Legalism Versus Kautilya's Arthashastra. Asian Philosophy 15 (2):157 – 172.
    Writing only decades apart, Han Feizi (ca. 250 BCE) and Kautilya (ca. 300 BCE) were two great political thinkers who argued for strong leaders, king or emperor, to unify warring states and bring peace, who tried to show how a ruler controls his ministers as well as the populace, defended the need for spies and violence, and developed the key ideas needed to support the bureaucracies of the emerging and unified states of China and India respectively. Whereas both thinkers disliked (...)
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  5. Zhizhong Cai (1991). The Sayings of Han Fei Zi: The Severe Code of the Legalist. Asiapac.
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  6. Ti Ch'ing (1978). A Reading of Han Fei's "Wu Tu" [Five Vermin]. Contemporary Chinese Thought 10 (1):19-33.
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  7. Ellen Marie Chen (1975). The Dialectic of Chih (Reason) and Tao (Nature) in the Han Fei-Tzu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (1):1-21.
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  8. Chung-Ying Cheng (1983). Metaphysics of Tao and Dialectics of Fa: An Evaluation of HTSC in Relations to Lao Tzu and Han Fei and an Analytical Study of Interrelationships of Tao, Fa, Hsing, Ming and Li. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 10 (3):251-284.
  9. Paul D.’Ambrosio (2014). Jiang, Chongyue 蔣重躍, Hanfeizi's Political Thought 韓非子的政治思想. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):273-275.
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  10. Wiebke Denecke (2010). The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Feizi. Distributed by Harvard University Press.
    Introduction: Chinese philosophy and the translation of disciplines -- The faces of masters literature until the Eastern Han -- Scenes of instruction and master bodies in the Analects -- From scenes of instruction to scenes of construction: Mozi -- Interiority, human nature, and exegesis in Mencius -- Authorship, human nature, and persuasion in Xunzi -- The race for precedence: polemics and the vacuum of traditions in Laozi -- Zhuangzi and the art of negation -- The self-regulating state, paranoia, and rhetoric (...)
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  11. David Elstein (2011). Han Feizi's Thought and Republicanism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):167-185.
    Feizi’s philosophy is usually represented as an amoral autocracy where the ruler is the sole political power and runs the state by controlling the people through rewards and punishments. While his system is formally autocratic, this article argues that the purpose behind this system bears some similarity to the republican political ideal of non-domination. In this interpretation, Han Feizi makes the ruler the sole power to mitigate the danger of the state being dominated by ministers. He does not employ republican (...)
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  12. Han Fei (2009). Interpreting Lao. In Thomas F. Cleary (ed.), The Way of the World: Readings in Chinese Philosophy. Shambhala.
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  13. Han Fei (2009). Taking Lessons From Lao. In Thomas F. Cleary (ed.), The Way of the World: Readings in Chinese Philosophy. Shambhala.
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  14. Owen Flanagan & H. U. Jing (2011). Han Fei Zi's Philosophical Psychology: Human Nature, Scarcity, and the Neo-Darwinian Consensus. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):293-316.
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  15. Albert Galvany (2013). Beyond the Rule of Rules: The Foundations of Sovereign Power in the Han Feizi. In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 87--106.
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  16. Paul R. Goldin (ed.) (2013). Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer.
    This edited volume on the thinker, his views on politics and philosophy, and the tensions of his relations with Confucianism (which he derided) is the first of its kind in English.Featuring contributions from specialists in various ...
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  17. Paul R. Goldin (2011). Persistent Misconceptions About Chinese “Legalism”. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):88-104.
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  18. Paul R. Goldin (2001). Han Fei's Doctrine of Self-Interest. Asian Philosophy 11 (3):151 – 159.
    Chapter 49 of the Han Feizi, entitled 'Wudu' ('The Five Vermin'), includes one of the earliest discussions in Chinese history of the concepts of gong and si: Han Fei (d. 233 B.C.) takes si to mean 'acting in one's own interest'. Gong is simply what opposes si. 'Acting in one's own interest' is not inherently reprehensible in Han Fei's view; but a ruler must remember why ministers propose their policies: they are concerned only with enriching themselves, and look upon the (...)
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  19. Chad Hansen (1994). Fa (Standards: Laws) and Meaning Changes in Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 44 (3):435-488.
    Argues that throughout the classical period in China, the word `fa' consistently means measurable, publicly accessible standards for the application of terms used in behavioral guidance. Review of the Daoist analysis of the meaning of fa; Original philosophical role of fa; Detail of Chinese philosopher Han Feizi's theories on the legal use of the term `fa.'.
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  20. Christoph Harbsmeier (1989). Humor in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 39 (3):289-310.
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  21. Eirik Lang Harris (2014). Legalism: Introducing a Concept and Analyzing Aspects of Han Fei's Political Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):155-164.
    ‘Legalism’ is a term that has long been used to categorize a group of early Chinese philosophers including, but not limited to, Han Fei (Han Feizi), Shen Dao, Shen Buhai, and Shang Yang. However, the usefulness of this term has been contested for nearly as long. This essay has the goal of introducing the idea of ‘Legalism’ and laying out aspects of the political thought of Han Fei, the most prominent of these thinkers. In this essay, I first lay out (...)
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  22. Eirik Lang Harris (2013). Constraining the Ruler: On Escaping Han Fei's Criticism of Confucian Virtue Politics. Asian Philosophy 23 (1):43-61.
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  23. Eirik Lang Harris (2013). Han Fei on the Role of Morality in Political Philosophy. In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer.
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  24. Eirik Lang Harris (2011). Is the Law in the Way? On the Source of Han Fei's Laws. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):73-87.
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  25. Wang Hsiao-po & L. S. Chang (1977). The Significance of the Concept of 'Fa' in Han Fei's Thought System. Philosophy East and West 27 (1):35-52.
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  26. Michael Hunter (2013). The Difficulty with “The Difficulties of Persuasion”(“Shuinan” 說難). In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 169--195.
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  27. Eric Hutton (2008). Han Feizi's Criticism of Confucianism and its Implications for Virtue Ethics. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (3):423-453.
    Several scholars have recently proposed that Confucianism should be regarded as a form of virtue ethics. This view offers new approaches to understanding not only Confucian thinkers, but also their critics within the Chinese tradition. For if Confucianism is a form of virtue ethics, we can then ask to what extent Chinese criticisms of it parallel criticisms launched against contemporary virtue ethics, and what lessons for virtue ethics in general might be gleaned from the challenges to Confucianism in particular. This (...)
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  28. Philip J. Ivanhoe (2011). Hanfeizi and Moral Self-Cultivation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):31-45.
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