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  1. Robert E. Allinson (ed.) (1989). Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots. Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from Western philosophy. The book (...)
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  2. Kyle David Anderson (2009). The Chan Interpretations of Wang Wei's Poetry: A Critical Review – by Jingqing Yang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):180-183.
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  3. Kyle David Anderson (2008). The Chan Interpretations of Wang Wei's Poetry: A Critical Review – by Yang Jingqing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):540-543.
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  4. Zong-qi Cai (1999). In Quest of Harmony: Plato and Confucius on Poetry. Philosophy East and West 49 (3):317-345.
    How Plato and Confucius formulate their views on poetry in light of their overriding concerns with harmony is examined here. Both acknowledge the educational value of poetry in similar terms and set up similar moral-aesthetic standards. Both rank poetry lower than other objects of learning because they find poetic harmony to be less significant than intellectual or moral harmonies. But both take note of the transforming aesthetic experience afforded by poetry in certain circumstances, and identify this experience of the attainment (...)
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  5. Chung-Yuan Chang (1963/1975). Creativity and Taoism: A Study of Chinese Philosophy, Art, & Poetry. Wildwood House.
  6. Chang Chung-Yuan (1976). Kant's Aesthetics and the East. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (4):399-411.
  7. Earle J. Coleman (2002). Aesthetic Commonalities in the Ethics of Daoism and Stoicism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (3):385–395.
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  8. Earle J. Coleman (1991). The Beautiful, the Ugly, and the Tao. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (2):213-226.
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  9. Eliot Deutsch (1976). On the Concept of Art. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (4):373-397.
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  10. John Zijiang Ding (1999). A Philosophical Perspective of Contemporary Chinese Conceptual Art. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):445-468.
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  11. James J. Fletcher (1980). Theme and Tradition in Aesthetics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (1):37-43.
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  12. Stephen J. Goldberg (2009). Philosophical Reflection and Visual Art in Traditional China. In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.
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  13. Paul R. Goldin (2010). Eifring, Halvor, Ed., Love and Emotions in Traditional Chinese Literature. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):237-240.
  14. Paul Groarke (1999). Chinese Poetry and Symbolism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):489-512.
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  15. Siu-Chi Huang (1976). The Concept of Beauty in Contemporary Chinese Aesthetics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (4):413-431.
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  16. Siu-Chi Huang (1963). Musical Art in Early Confucian Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 13 (1):49-60.
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  17. Vytautas Kavolis (1977). Aesthetic Structures in Civilizational Analysis. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (1):63-72.
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  18. Ha Poong Kim (2006). Confucius's Aesthetic Concept of Noble Man: Beyond Moralism. Asian Philosophy 16 (2):111 – 121.
    The prevailing interpretation of ren (humanness) in the Analects is ethical. One consequence of this interpretation is the one-dimensional image of the Confucian junzi (noble man) as a rigid moralist, a fastidious observer of li (ritual). But there are numerous passages in the Analects that resist such a one-sided representation of the junzi, especially Confucius's remarks related to the (Book of) Songs and music. My basic thesis is that Confucius's concept of junji is aesthetic. This is implied by his notion (...)
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  19. Karyn L. Lai (2003). Confucian Moral Cultivation : Some Parallels with Musical Training. In Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.), The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court.
  20. Tae-Seung Lim (2012). Observance of Forms: An Aesthetic Analysis of Analects 6.25. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):147-162.
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  21. Eva K. W. Man (1996). Chinese Philosophy and the Suggestion of a Matriarchal Aesthetics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (4):453-466.
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  22. Joseph Margolis (2004). Placing Artworks—Placing Ourselves. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):1–16.
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  23. Masato Mitsuda (1988). Taoist Philosophy and its Influence on Tang Naturalist Poetry. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (2):199-215.
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  24. David E. Mungello (1969). Neo-Confucianism and Wen-Jen Aesthetic Theory. Philosophy East and West 19 (4):367-383.
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  25. Angela Jung Palandri (1988). The Taoist Vision. A Study of T'ao Yuan-Ming's Nature Poetry. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (2):97-121.
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  26. An-yi Pan (2008). Shaping the Lotus Sutra: Buddhist Visual Culture in Medieval China – by Eugene Y. Wang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):182–185.
  27. Tom Rockmore (2004). Truth, Beauty, and the Social Function of Art. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):17–32.
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  28. Crispin Sartwell (2009). Dewey and Taoism: Teleology and Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (1):pp. 30-40.
  29. Crispin Sartwell (1993). Confucius and Country Music. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):243-254.
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  30. Ben-Ami Scharfstein (1976). Unless There Are Hills and Valleys in One's Breast: On the Inward Life of Chinese Landscape Painting. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (4):317-354.
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  31. Richard Sclafani (1977). Is the Tao of Chinese Aesthetics Like a Western Theory of Art? Some Issues in Comparative Aesthetics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (1):49-62.
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  32. Kwong-Loi Shun (1995). Confucian Ethics of the Axial Age: A Reconstruction Under the Aspect of the Breakthrough Toward Postconventional Thinking by Heiner Roetz. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):351-362.
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  33. Richard Shusterman (2009). Pragmatist Aesthetics and Confucianism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (1):pp. 18-29.
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  34. Sor-Hoon Tan (1999). Experience as Art. Asian Philosophy 9 (2):107 – 122.
    Chinese philosophy views experience as intrinsically aesthetic. This world view could be elucidated through a consideration of John Dewey's aesthetics and features of Chinese art. Dewey's philosophy of art starts with an understanding of experience as 'live processes' of living creatures interacting with their environment. Such processes are autopoietic in being self-sustaining, ever-changing, capable of increasing complexity, capable of generating novelty, direction and progress on its own. Its autopoietic character is a precondition of the aesthetic in the process of experience. (...)
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  35. Kirill O. Thompson (1990). Taoist Cultural Reality: The Harmony of Aesthetic Order. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (2):175-185.
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  36. Huaiyu Wang (2010). Jiang, Wenye 江文也, a Discourse on Confucius's Music 孔子的樂論. Translated From 上代支那正樂考—孔子の音樂論 by Y Ang Rubin 楊儒賓. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):115-119.
    Jiang, Wenye 江文也, A Discourse on Confucius’s Music 孔子的樂論. Translated from 上代支那正樂考—孔子の音樂論 by Y ang Rubin 楊儒賓 Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-009-9148-3 Authors Huaiyu Wang, Georgia College & State University Department of History, Geography, and Philosophy Campus Box 47 Milledgeville GA 31061 USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 9 Journal Issue Volume 9, Number 1.
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  37. Keping Wang (2010). Art as Sedimentation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):131-138.
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  38. Keping Wang (2009). Mozi Versus Xunzi on Music. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (4):653-665.
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  39. Yi Wang & Xiaowei Fu (2008). An Exegetic Study of the So-Called Proposition of Confucian Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetic Education 42 (1):80-89.
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  40. Christian Helmut Wenzel (2006). Beauty in Kant and Confucius: A First Step. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (1):95–107.
  41. Kuang-Ming Wu (2011). Stones From Other Mountains: Chinese Painting Studies in Postwar America – Edited and Introduced by Jason C. Kuo. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):499-501.
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  42. Xialing Xie (2009). Aesthetic Judgment: The Power of the Mind in Understanding Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):38-51.
    Mou Zongsan incorrectly uses Kant’s practical reason to interpret Confucianism. The saying that “what is it that we have in common in our minds? It is the li 理 (principles) and the yi 义 (righteousness)” reveals how Mencius explains the origin of li and yi through a theory of common sense. In “the li and the yi please our minds, just as the flesh of beef and mutton and pork please our mouths,” “please” is used twice, proving aesthetic judgment is (...)
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  43. Gang Xu (1999). The Aesthetic in Confucianism Examined From Three Viewpoints. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):425-444.
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  44. Michelle Yeh (1988). Taoism and Modern Chinese Poetry. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (2):173-197.
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  45. Shiao-Ling Yu (1988). Taoist Themes in Yuan Drama (with Emphasis on the Plays of Ma Chih-Yuan). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (2):123-149.
  46. Jinmei Yuan (2002). Exploring the Logical Space in the Patterns of Classical Chinese Mathematical Art. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (4):519–531.
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  47. Qian Zhang (2009). The Boundaries of Beauty in Pre-Qin Confucian Aesthetics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):52-63.
    “Beauty” is a very important concept in Pre-Qin Confucian aesthetics. Pre-Qin Confucian aesthetics generally had two viewpoints when defining beauty: Negatively, by stressing that “beauty” in the aesthetic sense was not “good”; and positively, by stressing two factors: one, that beauty was related to “feeling” which was not an animal instinct, the other was that “beauty” was a special texture with a particular meaning. “Beauty” in Pre-Qin Confucian aesthetics may be defined as “texture (or form)” capable of communicating feeling or (...)
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  48. Rui Zhu (2002). Wu-Wei: Lao-Zi, Zhuang-Zi and the Aesthetic Judgement. Asian Philosophy 12 (1):53 – 63.
    The concept of wu-wei (nonaction) has undergone significant changes from Lao-zi to Zhuang-zi. This paper will argue that, while wu-wei in Lao-zi is a utilitarian principle, wu-wei of Zhuan-zi represents an aesthetic world-view. The aesthetic nature of the Daoist nonaction will be illustrated through Kant's concept of 'purposiveness without purpose'.
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  49. Hui Zou (2008). Jing (景): A Phenomenological Reflection on Chinese Landscape and Qing (情). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):353-368.
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