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  1. David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei (2009). Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):473 - 482.
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study in the Chinese automobile (...)
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  2. Mohammad Ashraf Adeel (2008). Islamic Ethics and the Controversy About the Moral Heart of Confucianism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):151-156.
  3. Joseph A. Adler (2008). Zhu XI's Spiritual Practice as the Basis of His Central Philosophical Concepts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):57-79.
    The argument is that (1) the spiritual crisis that Zhu Xi discussed with Zhang Shi 張栻 (1133–1180) and the other “gentlemen of Hunan” from about 1167 to 1169, which was resolved by an understanding of what we might call the interpenetration of the mind’s stillness and activity (dong-jing 動靜) or equilibrium and harmony (zhong-he 中和), (2) led directly to his realization that Zhou Dunyi’s thought provided a cosmological basis for that resolution, and (3) this in turn led Zhu Xi to (...)
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  4. Aphrodite Alexandrakis (2006). The Role of Music and Dance in Ancient Greek and Chinese Rituals: Form Versus Content. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):267–278.
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  5. Barry Allen (2010). A Dao of Technology? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):151-160.
    Scholars have detected hostility to technology in Daoist thought. But is this a problem with any machine or only some applications of some machines by some people? I show that the problem is not with machines per se but with the people who introduce them, or more exactly with their knowledge. It is not knowledge as such that causes the disorder Laozi and Zhuangzi associate with machines; it is confused, disordered knowledge—superficial, inadequate, unsubtle, and artless. In other words the problem (...)
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  6. Robert E. Allinson (1994). Moral Values and the Taoist Sage in the Tao de Ching. Asian Philosophy 4 (2):127 – 136.
    Abstract The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Tao de Ching regarding moral values and the Taoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Tao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral behaviour (...)
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  7. Robert E. Allinson (1992). The Golden Rule as the Core Value in Confucianism & Christianity: Ethical Similarities and Differences. Asian Philosophy 2 (2):173 – 185.
    Abstract One side of this paper is devoted to showing that the Golden Rule, understood as standing for universal love, is centrally characteristic of Confucianism properly understood, rather than graded, familial love. In this respect Confucianism and Christianity are similar. The other side of this paper is devoted to arguing contra 18 centuries of commentators that the negative sentential formulation of the Golden Rule as found in Confucius cannot be converted to an affirmative sentential formulation (as is found in Christianity) (...)
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  8. Robert E. Allinson (ed.) (1989). Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots. Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from Western philosophy. The book (...)
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  9. Robert E. Allinson (1985). The Confucian Golden Rule: A Negative Formualtion. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (3):305-315.
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  10. Robert Elliott Allinson (2003). Hillel and Confucius: The Prescriptive Formulation of the Golden Rule in the Jewish and Chinese Confucian Ethical Traditions. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):29-41.
    A prospective convert asked Hillel to teach him the entire Torahwhile standing on one foot. Hillel replied, What is hateful to yourself, do not do to your fellow man. That isthe whole of Torah and the remainder is but commentary. Go and study it. (Hillel:Shab. 31; emphasis added) Zigong: Is there asingle word that can serve as a guide to conduct throughout one’s life? Confucius said: Perhaps the word ‘shu’, ‘reciprocity’: ‘Do not do to others what you would not want (...)
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  11. Robert Almeder (1980). The Harmony of Confucian and Taoist Moral Attitudes. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (1):51-53.
  12. Roger T. Ames (2011). Confucian Role Ethics: A Vocabulary. The Chinese University Press.
  13. Roger T. Ames (2002). Observing Ritual “Proprietyli” as Focusing the “Familiar” in the Affairs of the Day. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):143-156.
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  14. Roger T. Ames (1986). Taoism and the Nature of Nature. Environmental Ethics 8 (4):317-350.
    The problems of environmental ethics are so basic that the exploration of an alternative metaphysics or attendant ethical theory is not a sufficiently radical solution. In fact, the assumptions entailed in adefinition of systematic philosophy that gives us a tradition of metaphysics might themselves be the source of the current crisis. We might need to revision the responsibilities of the philosopher and think in terms of the artist rather than the “scientific of first principles.” Taoism proceeds from art rather than (...)
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  15. Roger T. Ames (1984). Coextending Arising, Te, and Will to Power: Two Doctrines of Self-Transformation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (2):113-138.
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  16. Ok-Sun An (1997). Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics. Peter Lang.
  17. Yanming An (2009). Li, Youzheng 李幼蒸, a Hermeneutics of the Ren-Learning: A Structural Analysis of Confucian Ethics 仁學解釋學 : 孔孟倫理學結構分析. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):341-344.
  18. Yanming An (2008). Family Love in Confucius and Mencius. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):51-55.
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  19. Yanming An (2004). Western 'Sincerity' and Confucian 'Cheng'. Asian Philosophy 14 (2):155 – 169.
    In philology, both 'sincerity' and 'cheng' primarily mean, 'to be true to oneself'. As a philosophical term, 'sincerity' roots in Aristotle's 'aletheutikos'. In medieval Europe, it is regarded as a neutral value that may either serve or disserve for 'truth.' As for Romantics, it is a positive value, and an individualistic concept whose two elements 'true' and 'self' refer to a person's 'true feeling' and 'individuality'. In contrast, both 'self' and 'true' in Confucianism are universalistic concepts, meaning 'good nature' common (...)
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  20. Yanming An (2004). The Concept of Cheng and its Western Translations. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):117-136.
    The main reasons for the difficulty in understanding and translatingcheng may be summarized as follows. First, its prehistory is not always clear. This makes it troublesome to identify its original meaning. Second, the multiple sources from the three schools, Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, often causecheng to be entangled with various concepts specifically affiliated to certain schools. The particular meanings of these concepts and their connections withcheng possibly mislead our effort to explore the core content ofcheng as such. Finally,cheng has been (...)
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  21. Allan W. Anderson (1990). On the Concept of Freedom in the I Ching: A Deconstructionist View of Self-Cultivation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (3):275-287.
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  22. Allan W. Anderson (1982). Approaches to the Meaning of Ming, in the I Ching with Particular Reference to Self-Cultivation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):169-195.
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  23. Stephen C. Angle (2011). Review of Kam-Por Yu, Julia Tao, Philip J. Ivanhoe (Eds.), Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: ContemPorary Theories and Applications. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
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  24. Stephen C. Angle (2010). Translating (and Interpreting) the Mengzi: Virtue, Obligation, and Discretion. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (4):676-683.
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  25. Stephen C. Angle (2009). Defining “Virtue Ethics” and Exploring Virtues in a Comparative Context. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):297-304.
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  26. Stephen C. Angle (2008). No Supreme Principle: Confucianism's Harmonization of Multiple Values. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):35-40.
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  27. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Review of kWong-Loi Shun, David B. Wong (Eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (12).
  28. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Sagely Ease and Moral Perception. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):31-55.
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  29. Olivier Ansart (2006). Kaiho Seiry on 'What It is to Be a Human Being'. Asian Philosophy 16 (1):65 – 86.
    Kaiho Seiry (1755-1817) is probably the first Japanese thinker to proclaim the contractual nature of human relationships. I examine in this paper the view of human beings that led him to this conclusion. Giving up previous definitions of humans, Seiry focuses on the faculty of practical reason. While this leads him to recognize a hierarchy of humans, some having more humanity than others, it also allows him to develop the most modern understanding of social relationship available in his time. His (...)
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  30. Dennis Arjo (2011). Ren Xing and What It is to Be Truly Human. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):455-473.
  31. Tongdong Bai (2009). The Price of Serving Meat—on Confucius's and Mencius's Views of Human and Animal Rights. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):85 – 99.
    The apparent conflict between some fundamental ideas of Confucianism and of rights seems to render Confucianism incompatible with rights. I will illustrate the general strategies, based upon an insight of the later Rawls, to solve the incompatibility problem. I will then show how these strategies can help us to develop a Confucian account of animal rights, which, by way of example, demonstrates how Confucianism can endorse and develop unique and constructive accounts of most rights that are commonly recognized today.
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  32. William Theodore Bary (1979). Foreword to Symposium on Modes of Self-Cultivation in Traditional China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 6 (2):119-121.
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  33. James Behuniak Jr (2011). Naturalizing Mencius. Philosophy East and West 61 (3):492-515.
    In a recent paper titled “Mencius and an Ethics of the New Century,” Donald J. Munro argues that recent theories in the evolutionary sciences regarding the biological basis of altruism and infant bonding might lend credence to Mencius’ philosophy of human nature.1 Such theories, says Munro, support Mencius’ contention that certain moral concepts derive from something that is inborn. What such naturalistic theories do not address, however, is whether or not these moral concepts are also “founded on something transcendental,” and (...)
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  34. James Behuniak Jr (2010). Hitting the Mark: Archery and Ethics in Early Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (4):588-604.
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  35. James Behuniak (2010). John Dewey and the Virtue of Cook Ding's Dao. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):161-174.
    Certain discussions about “relativism” in the philosophy of Zhuangzi turn on the question of the morality of his dao 道. Some commentators, most notably Robert Eno, maintain that there is no ethical value whatsoever to Zhuangzi’s dao as presented in the Cook Ding episode and other “knack passages.” In this essay, it is argued that there is indeed a moral dimension to Cook Ding’s dao. One way to recognize it is to explore the similarity between that dao and John Dewey’s (...)
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  36. James Behuniak (2010). Wen, Haiming, Confucian Pragmatism as the Art of Contextualizing Personal Experience and World. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):249-252.
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  37. Daniel A. Bell & Thaddeus Metz (2011). Confucianism and Ubuntu: Reflections on a Dialogue Between Chinese and African Traditions. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (supp):78-95.
    In this article we focus on three key precepts shared by Confucianism and the African ethic of Ubuntu: the central value of community, the desirability of ethical partiality, and the idea that we tend to become morally better as we grow older. For each of these broad similarities, there are key differences underlying them, and we discuss those as well as speculate about the reasons for them. Our aim is not to take sides, but we do suggest ways that Ubuntu (...)
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  38. Douglas L. Berger (2008). Relational and Intrinsic Moral Roots: A Brief Contrast of Confucian and Hindu Concepts of Duty. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):157-163.
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  39. John Berthrong (2010). Father and Son in Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of Xunzi and Paul – by Yanxia Zhao. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):330-333.
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  40. John Berthrong (1998). Confucian Piety and the Religious Dimension of Japanese Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 48 (1):46-79.
    Definitions of the nature of Confucian piety and the religious dimension of the Japanese Confucian tradition are sought. The general religious dimension of Confucianism is defined both by the nature of its canon, the Thirteen Classics, and its transcendent referent, the root metaphor of ultimate concern. The Japanese Confucians inherited this pan-East Asian philosophic and religious tradition and modified it to suit their own cultural and religious sensibilities. If we recognize, as Herbert Fingarette has shown, that for Confucians the secular (...)
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  41. John Berthrong (1987). Chu Hsi's Ethics: Jen and Ch'eng. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 14 (2):161-178.
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  42. John H. Berthrong (2008). The Hard Sayings: The Confucian Case of Xiao 孝 in Kongzi and Mengzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):119-123.
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  43. L. Stafford Betty (1980). Lianc-Chih, Key to Wang Yang-Ming's Ethical Monism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (2):115-129.
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  44. Lijun Bi & Fred D'agostino (2004). The Doctrine of Filial Piety: A Philosophical Analysis of the Concealment Case. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):451-467.
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  45. Global Bioethics & Global Dialogue (2002). Julia Tao Lai Po-Wah. In Julia Lai Po-Wah Tao (ed.), Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the (Im) Possibility of Global Bioethics. Kluwer Academic Pub..
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  46. Anne D. Birdwhistell (1995). Medicine and History as Theoretical Tools in a Confucian Pragmatism. Philosophy East and West 45 (1):1-28.
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  47. Donald Blakeley (2010). The Analects on Death. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):397-416.
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  48. Donald N. Blakeley (2003). Listening to the Animals: The Confucian View of Animal Welfare. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (2):137–157.
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  49. Donald N. Blakeley (1996). Cultivation of Self in Chu Hsi and Plotinus. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (4):385-413.
  50. Mary I. Bockover (2003). Confucian Values and the Internet: A Potential Conflict. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (2):159–175.
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