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  1. Michael C. Brannigan (2009). Striking a Balance: A Primer in Traditional Asian Values. Lexington Books.
    Introduction -- Hindu ethics -- Life's four goals -- Paths to Enlightenment -- Karma and rebirth -- Shades of Dharma -- Buddhist ethics -- The middle path -- The four noble truths -- In the wake of karma -- The four supreme virtues -- What is a Buddhist social ethics? -- Zen Buddhist ethics -- A way of the monk : practice is attainment -- A way of the warrior -- A way of tea : the virtue of presence -- (...)
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  2. Chʻu Chai (1975). The Story of Chinese Philosophy. Greenwood Press.
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  3. Wing-tsit Chan (1969). An Outline and an Annotated Bibliography of Chinese Philosophy. New Haven, Far Eastern Publications, Yale University.
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  4. Wing-tsit Chan (1963). A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
    This Source Book is devoted to the purpose of providing such a basis for genuine understanding of Chinese thought (and thereby of Chinese life and culture, ...
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  5. Wing-tsit Chan (1955). Historical Charts of Chinese Philosophy. New Haven, Far Eastern Publications, Yale University.
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  6. Wing-tsit Chan (1955). An Outline and a Bibliography of Chinese Philosophy. Hanover, N.H..
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  7. Wing-Tsit Chan (1954). Chinese Philosophy, a Bibliographical Essay. Philosophy East and West 3 (4):337-357.
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  8. Wing-Tsit Chan (1954). Basic Problems in the Study of Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 4 (2):157-166.
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  9. Wing-Tsit Chan (1953). A Bibliography of Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 3 (3):241-256.
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  10. Wei Changbao (2006). The “Legitimacy” of Chinese Philosophy. Contemporary Chinese Thought 37 (3):90-97.
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  11. Ruth C. Chao (2008). Counseling as Inter-Culture : Another "Cultural Hermeneutic". In Jay Goulding (ed.), China-West Interculture: Toward the Philosophy of World Integration: Essays on Wu Kuang-Ming's Thinking. Global Scholarly Publications.
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  12. Chung-Kuo Che-Hsüeh (1985). A_bief Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (2):229-230.
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  13. Bo Chen (2006). The Debate on the Yan-Yi Relation in Chinese Philosophy: Reconstruction and Comments. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):539-560.
    The debate on the yan-yi relation was carried out by Chinese philosophers collectively, and the principles and methods in the debate still belong to a living tradition of Chinese philosophy. From Yijing (Book of Changes), Lunyu (Analects), Laozi and Zhuangzi to Wang Bi, "yi" which cannot be expressed fully by yan (language), is not only "idea" or "meaning" in the human mind, but is also some kind of ontological existence, which is beyond yan and emblematic symbols, and unspeakable. Thus, the (...)
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  14. Chung-Ying Cheng (2012). Preface: “My Way is Penetrated with One Unity”. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):1-2.
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  15. Chung-Ying Cheng (2011). Editor's Discussion. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):330-330.
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  16. Chung-Ying Cheng (2011). Obituary and Memory of Professor Kenneth K. Inada. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):331-331.
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  17. Zeng Chunhai (ed.) (2005). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Gai Lun = Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Wu Nan Tu Shu Chu Ban Gong Si.
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  18. Diané Collinson, Dr Robert Wilkinson & Robert Wilkinson (1994). Thirty-Five Oriental Philosophers. Routledge.
    These are questions to which oriental thinkers have given a wide range of philosophical answers that are intellectually and imaginatively stimulating. Thirty-Five Oriental Philosophers is a succinctly informative introduction to the thought of thirty-five important figures in the Chinese, Indian, Arab, Japanese and Tibetan philosophical traditions. Thinkers covered include founders such as Zoroaster, Confucius, Buddha and Muhammed, as well as influential modern figures such as Gandhi, Mao Tse-Tung, Suzuki and Nishida. The book is divided into sections, in which an introduction (...)
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  19. Tim Connolly (2012). Friendship and Filial Piety: Relational Ethics in Aristotle and Early Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):71-88.
    This article examines the origins of and philosophical justifications for Aristotelian friendship (philia) and early Confucian filial piety (xiao). What underlying assumptions about bonds between friends and family members do the philosophies share or uniquely possess? Is the Aristotelian emphasis on relationships between equals incompatible with the Confucian regard for filiality? As I argue, the Aristotelian and early Confucian accounts, while different in focus, share many of the same tensions in the attempt to balance hierarchical and familial associations with those (...)
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  20. Tim Connolly (2012). Learning Chinese Philosophy with Commentaries. Teaching Philosophy 35 (1):1-18.
    The last two decades have seen a resurgence of interest in the study of classical Chinese texts by means of the subsequent commentaries. New versions of works like the Analects and Mencius that include selected commentaries have begun to appear, making some view about the value of commentaries necessary simply for picking which edition of a text to read. In this paper, I consider the potential role of the 2000-year-old commentarial tradition in the teaching and learning of Chinese philosophy. Given (...)
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  21. A. S. Cua (ed.) (2003). Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
    Featuring contributions from the world's most highly esteemed Asian philosophy scholars, this important encyclopedia covers the complex and increasingly influential field of Chinese thought, from earliest recorded times to the present day. Including coverage on the subject previously unavailable to English speakers, the Encyclopedia sheds light on the extensive range of concepts, movements, philosophical works, and thinkers that populate the field. It includes a thorough survey of the history of Chinese philosophy; entries on all major thinkers from Confucius to Mou (...)
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  22. Nicholas Dew (2009). Orientalism in Louis XIV's France. OUP Oxford.
    Before the Enlightenment, and before the imperialism of the later eighteenth century, how did European readers find out about the varied cultures of Asia? Orientalism in Louis XIV's France presents a history of Oriental studies in seventeenth-century France, mapping the place within the intellectual culture of the period that was given to studies of Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Chinese texts, as well as writings on Mughal India. The Orientalist writers studied here produced books that would become sources used throughout the (...)
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  23. Mark Elvin (1978). Self-Liberation and Self-Immolation in Modern Chinese Thought. Australian National University.
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  24. Youlan Fung (1948). Chinese Philosophy and a Future World Philosophy. Philosophical Review 57 (6):539-549.
  25. Ashok Gangadean (2002). Logos of Dao : The Primal Logic of Translatability. Asian Philosophy 12 (3):213 – 221.
    In these reflections I attempt to re-situate the philosophical concerns and challenges of interpretation and translation between worlds in the more expansive context of the global philosophy of worldviews, which probes more deeply into the universal common ground of diverse worlds as they have evolved through the ages. This global space in which widely diverse worldviews (cultures, religions, ideologies, cosmologies, disciplinary narratives, interpretations, translations ) meet and interact opens new horizons and frontiers in exploring the hermeneutical, logical and ontological conditions (...)
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  26. Chunjun Gu & Keqian Xu (2014). Netherworld Marriage in Ancient China: Its Historical Evolution and Ideological Background. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 13 (38):78-109.
    The netherworld marriage or the wedding for dead persons is a folk religious ritual in ancientChina. It is based on ancient Chinese folk belief of afterlife in the netherworld. Through a textual research and investigation based on relevant historical records and other ancient documents, as well as some archeological discoveries, this paper tries to give a brief account of the origin and development of netherworld marriage and its cultural and ideological background in ancient China. It finds that netherworld marriage might (...)
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  27. Jiang Guanghui (2008). A Modern Translation of Confucius's Comments on the Poetry (Kongzi Shilun). Contemporary Chinese Thought 39 (4):49-60.
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  28. Chad Hansen (2011). Remembering Mass: Response to Yang Xiaomei. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):541-546.
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  29. Philomène Harrison (1970). The Indian Mind: Essentials of Indian Philosophy and Culture, And: The Chinese Mind: Essentials of Chinese Philosophy and Culture, And: The Japanese Mind: Essentials of Japanese Philosophy and Culture (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (1):115-121.
  30. Larry D. Harwood (2011). Recent Texts in Asian Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 34 (2):151-161.
    This review article surveys five recent texts in the field of Asian philosophy. The reviewer looks at the practicability of each work for the classroom, as well as for scholars in the field. Strong points of each text are noted, as well as the intricacies of the introductions to each text supplied by the editor or translator of the respective books.The texts reviewed have as their subject China and Confucianism, with the exception of one work on Zen, though the link (...)
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  31. Tze-Ki Hon (2012). Wennei Wenwai: Zhongguo Sixiang Shi Zhong de Jingdian Quanshi 《文內文外:中國思想史中的經典詮釋》 (Intratextual and Extratextual: Interpretations of Chinese Classics in Chinese Intellectual History) – By Lo Yuet-Keung 勞悅強. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):160-162.
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  32. Manyul Im (2003). Learning From Asian Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (1):127–130.
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  33. Monte Ransome Johnson (2001). Review of Mann, The Discovery of Things, and Wardy, Aristotle in China. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):188-198.
    A review and comparison of two recent and very different monographs about Aristotle's Categories: W. R. Mann "The Discovery of Things" and Robert Ward's "Aristotle in China".
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  34. Ian Johnston (2012). Reply to Dan Robins's Review. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):267-269.
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  35. Joel Kupperman (1999). Learning From Asian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    In an attempt to bridge the vast divide between classical Asian thought and contemporary Western philosophy, Joel J. Kupperman finds that the two traditions do not, by and large, supply different answers to the same questions. Rather, each tradition is searching for answers to their own set of questions--mapping out distinct philosophical investigations. In this groundbreaking book, Kupperman argues that the foundational Indian and Chinese texts include lines of thought that can enrich current philosophical practice, and in some cases provide (...)
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  36. Karyn L. Lai (2007). Introduction: New Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (s1):3-8.
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  37. Karyn L. Lai (2003). Critical Notice of Joel J. Kupperman, Learning From Asian Philosophy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):126 – 133.
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  38. John Laird (1939). A History of Chinese Philosophy. The Period of the Philosophers. By Fung Yu-Lan, Ph.D. Translated by Derk Bodde . (Peiping: Henri Vetch; London: G. Allen & Unwin, Ltd. 1937. Pp. Xx + 454. Price in England 25s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 14 (53):112-.
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  39. D. C. Lau (1956). Chinese Philosophy. Philosophical Quarterly 6 (23):169-173.
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  40. Jung Lee (2011). Reply to Carr and Ivanhoe. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):253-254.
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  41. Kuang-Sae Lee (1984). A Critique of the Scope and the Method of the Northropian Philosophical Anthropology and the Projection of a Hope for a Meeting of East and West. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (3):255-274.
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  42. Christopher M. Lehner (1955). A History of Chinese Philosophy. New Scholasticism 29 (4):477-480.
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  43. Chenyang Li (2011). The Seventeenth International Conference for Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):166-166.
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  44. Chenyang Li (2007). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy: From Ancient Philosophy to Chinese Buddhism – by Jeeloo Liu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (3):458–461.
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  45. Chien-Te Lin (2011). A Discourse on the Problem of Consciousness From the Viewpoint of Oriental Philosophy. Asian Philosophy 21 (3):303 - 321.
    This paper discusses the possible inspirations that might be derived from the viewpoints of Eastern Philosophy in contemporary studies of consciousness. First of all, two notions of consciousness are introduced, one of which can be explained by science. The other however cannot, and as such is also called the ?Hard Problem?. Secondly, the special features shared by morality and the ?Hard Problem of Consciousness? are discussed. Thirdly, I discuss the conventional routes Oriental philosophy takes toward an exploration of the human (...)
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  46. Ronnie Littlejohn (2006). Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy, And: Classic Asian Philosophy: A Guide to the Essential Texts (Review). Philosophy East and West 56 (4):687-694.
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  47. Ronnie Littlejohn (2001). “The Liezi's Use of the Zhuangzi&Quot;. In Ronnie Littlejohn Jeffrey Dippmann (ed.), Riding the Wind: New Essays on the Daoist Classic the Liezi,.
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  48. Ronnie Littlejohn & Marthe Chandler (eds.) (2008). Polishing the Chinese Mirror: Essays in Honor of Henry Rosemont, Jr. Global Scholarly Publications.
    Edited by Marthe Chandler and Ronnie Littlejohn, this work is a collection of expository and critical essays on the work of Henry Rosemont, Jr., a prominent and influential contemporary philosopher, activist, translator, and educator in the field of Asian and Comparative Philosophy. The essays in this collection take up three major themes in Rosemont's work: his work in Chinese linguistics, his contribution to the theory of human rights, and his interest in East Asian religion. Contributions include works by the leading (...)
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  49. Ronnie Littlejohn & Jeffrey Dippmann (eds.) (2011). Riding the Wind With Liezi: New Perspectives on the Daoist Classic. State University of New York.
    The Liezi is the forgotten classic of Daoism. Along with the Laozi (Daodejing) and the Zhuangzi, it's been considered a Daoist masterwork since the mid-eighth century, yet unlike those well-read works, the Liezi is little known and receives scant scholarly attention. Nevertheless, the Liezi is an important text that sheds valuable light on the early history of Daoism, particularly the formative period of sectarian Daoism. We do not know exactly what shape the original text took, but what remains is replete (...)
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  50. JeeLoo Liu, Reconstructing Chinese Metaphysics.
    This paper calls for a reconstruction of Chinese metaphysics that recognizes the distinct features of Chinese worldview, while at the same time explores the speculative thinking behind the dominant ethical concerns in Chinese philosophy. It suggests some research topics for constructing a Chinese moral metaphysics, without turning it into a metaphysical ethics – the difference between the two is that the former is fundamentally “truth-pursuing” while the latter is “good-pursuing.” This paper argues that even though Chinese metaphysics is deeply connected (...)
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