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  1. Peter A. Boodberg (1953). The Semasiology of Some Primary Confucian Concepts. Philosophy East and West 2 (4):317-332.
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  2. Shirley Chan (2012). Zhong 中 and Ideal Rulership in the Baoxun 保訓 (Instructions for Preservation) Text of the Tsinghua Collection of Bamboo Slip Manuscripts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):129-145.
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  3. Shirley Chan (2011). Cosmology, Society, and Humanity: Tian in the Guodian Texts (Part I)1. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):64-77.
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  4. Marthe Chandler (2012). The Chinese Aesthetic Tradition (Review). Philosophy East and West 62 (1):147-150.
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  5. Ning Chen (2000). The Etymology of Sheng (Sage) and its Confucian Conception in Early China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (4):409–427.
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  6. Chung-Ying Cheng (2011). A Transformative Conception of Confucian Ethics: The Yijing, Utility, and Rights. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):7-28.
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  7. Xiaoqiang Han (2009). Maybe There Are No Subject-Predicate Sentences in Chinese. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):277-287.
    In this essay, I argue for the conclusion that the Chinese sentences that are regularly translated into subject-predicate sentences in English may be understood as all non-subject-predicate sentences. My argument is based on the premise that some grammatical features are crucial to yield the sense of contrast between the completeness of subject and the incompleteness of predicate. The absence of such grammatical features in Chinese makes it impossible to establish any criterion for the distinction between subject and predicate in Chinese.
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  8. Donald Holzman (1956). The Conversational Tradition in Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 6 (3):223-230.
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  9. Philipp Keller, The Tao of Metaphysics: The Epidemiology of Names.
    We present a uni!ed diagnosis of three well"known puzzles about proper names, based on a new view of the metaphysics of words and proper names in particular adumbrated by David Kaplan in #Words$. Exploring the analogy of words and viruses, we sketch an account of words as entia suc! cessiva, highlighting the crucial phenomenon of linguistic coordination. Understanding the famous puzzles as coordination failures, we think, brings to the fore important issues in the metaphysical foundations of direct reference. Words, it (...)
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  10. Galia Patt-Shamir (2005). Way as Dao; Way as Halakha: Confucianism, Judaism, and Way Metaphors. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):137-158.
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  11. Peng Peng (2011). Benti, Practice and State: On the Doctrine of Mind in the Four Chapters of Guanzi. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):549-564.
    “ Xin 心 (Mind)” is one of the key concepts in the four chapters of Guanzi . Together with Dao, qi 气 (air, or gas) and de 德 (virtue), the four concepts constitute a complete system of the learning of mind which is composed of the theory of benti 本体 (root and body), the theory of practice and the theory of spiritual state. Guanzi differentiates the two basic layers of mind—the essence and the function. It tries to attain a state (...)
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  12. Yu Qiang (2006). The Theme and Logical Construction of the Taoist Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):133-143.
    Fully embracing previous achievements in the research of Taoist philosophy, this paper attempts to create a sound analysis and investigation of the value concern of Taoism and reconstruct a new set of Taoist philosophy conforming to the requirement of modern science from the perspective of modern philosophy. The author sincerely wishes that the preliminary understanding of the Taoist philosophy presented in this paper would contribute to the construction of the Taoist philosophy.
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  13. Edward Slingerland (2011). Metaphor and Meaning in Early China. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):1-30.
    Western scholarship on early Chinese thought has tended to either dismiss the foundational role of metaphor or to see it as a uniquely Chinese mode of apprehending the world. This article argues that, while human cognition is in fact profoundly dependent on imagistic conceptual structures, such dependence is by no means a unique feature of Chinese thought. The article reviews empirical evidence supporting the claims that human thought is fundamentally imagistic; that sensorimotor schemas are often used to structure our understanding (...)
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  14. Hoyt Cleveland Tillman (1981). The Development of Tension Between Virtue and Achievement in Early Confucianism: Attitudes Toward Kuan Chung and Hegemon (Pa) as Conceptual Symbols. Philosophy East and West 31 (1):17-28.
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  15. Shuren Wang (2009). The Roots of Chinese Philosophy and Culture — an Introduction to “ Xiang ” and “ Xiang Thinking”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):1-12.
    To grasp the truth in traditional Chinese classics, we need to uncover the long obscured xiang 象 (image) thinking, which has long been overshadowed by Occidentalism. xiang thinking is the most fundamental thought of human beings. The logic of linguistics all comes from xiang thinking . Through conceptual thinking, people can understand Western classics on metaphysics, yet they may not completely understand the various schools of Chinese classics. The difference between Chinese and Western ways of thinking originated in the difference (...)
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  16. Marshall D. Willman (2009). Illocutionary Force and its Relation to Mood: Comparative Methodology Reconsidered. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):439-455.
    It is sometimes argued that the study of grammar is irrelevant or unimportant in the business of comparative philosophy, or that it ought to be avoided in favor of methods that presuppose a strongly pragmatic point of view. In this regard, some philosophers have expressed skepticism about whether facts about grammar have anything to offer in the adjudication of competing theories of interpretation or translation. This essay argues that a strongly pragmatic orientation in comparative philosophy invariably overlooks an important role (...)
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  17. Zhiping Yu (2009). The Evolution and Formation of Indigenous Narration in Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):511-523.
    Independent narration in Chinese philosophy has gone through the process of interpretation, critical differentiation, dialogue, and original thought, and so is a creative activity that surpasses the conjunctive pattern of universality and particularity. In modern Confucian studies, there has always been a tension between philosophical and historical explanations, which suggests a tension between ecumenical and indigenous experiences. Critical differentiation itself only has methodological significance, and is not a goal in itself. China’s development and strength has encouraged China to engage in (...)
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Chinese Philosophy: Aesthetics
  1. Robert E. Allinson (ed.) (1989). Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots. Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from Western philosophy. The book (...)
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  2. Kyle David Anderson (2009). The Chan Interpretations of Wang Wei's Poetry: A Critical Review – by Jingqing Yang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):180-183.
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  3. Kyle David Anderson (2008). The Chan Interpretations of Wang Wei's Poetry: A Critical Review – by Yang Jingqing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):540-543.
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  4. Zong-qi Cai (1999). In Quest of Harmony: Plato and Confucius on Poetry. Philosophy East and West 49 (3):317-345.
    How Plato and Confucius formulate their views on poetry in light of their overriding concerns with harmony is examined here. Both acknowledge the educational value of poetry in similar terms and set up similar moral-aesthetic standards. Both rank poetry lower than other objects of learning because they find poetic harmony to be less significant than intellectual or moral harmonies. But both take note of the transforming aesthetic experience afforded by poetry in certain circumstances, and identify this experience of the attainment (...)
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  5. Chung-Yuan Chang (1963/1975). Creativity and Taoism: A Study of Chinese Philosophy, Art, & Poetry. Wildwood House.
  6. Chang Chung-Yuan (1976). Kant's Aesthetics and the East. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (4):399-411.
  7. Earle J. Coleman (2002). Aesthetic Commonalities in the Ethics of Daoism and Stoicism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (3):385–395.
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  8. Earle J. Coleman (1991). The Beautiful, the Ugly, and the Tao. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (2):213-226.
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  9. Eliot Deutsch (1976). On the Concept of Art. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (4):373-397.
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  10. John Zijiang Ding (1999). A Philosophical Perspective of Contemporary Chinese Conceptual Art. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):445-468.
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  11. James J. Fletcher (1980). Theme and Tradition in Aesthetics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (1):37-43.
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  12. Stephen J. Goldberg (2009). Philosophical Reflection and Visual Art in Traditional China. In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.
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  13. Paul R. Goldin (2010). Eifring, Halvor, Ed., Love and Emotions in Traditional Chinese Literature. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):237-240.
  14. Paul Groarke (1999). Chinese Poetry and Symbolism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):489-512.
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  15. Siu-Chi Huang (1976). The Concept of Beauty in Contemporary Chinese Aesthetics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (4):413-431.
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  16. Siu-Chi Huang (1963). Musical Art in Early Confucian Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 13 (1):49-60.
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  17. Vytautas Kavolis (1977). Aesthetic Structures in Civilizational Analysis. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (1):63-72.
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  18. Ha Poong Kim (2006). Confucius's Aesthetic Concept of Noble Man: Beyond Moralism. Asian Philosophy 16 (2):111 – 121.
    The prevailing interpretation of ren (humanness) in the Analects is ethical. One consequence of this interpretation is the one-dimensional image of the Confucian junzi (noble man) as a rigid moralist, a fastidious observer of li (ritual). But there are numerous passages in the Analects that resist such a one-sided representation of the junzi, especially Confucius's remarks related to the (Book of) Songs and music. My basic thesis is that Confucius's concept of junji is aesthetic. This is implied by his notion (...)
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  19. Karyn L. Lai (2003). Confucian Moral Cultivation : Some Parallels with Musical Training. In Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.), The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court.
  20. Tae-Seung Lim (2012). Observance of Forms: An Aesthetic Analysis of Analects 6.25. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):147-162.
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  21. Eva K. W. Man (1996). Chinese Philosophy and the Suggestion of a Matriarchal Aesthetics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (4):453-466.
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  22. Joseph Margolis (2004). Placing Artworks—Placing Ourselves. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):1–16.
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  23. Masato Mitsuda (1988). Taoist Philosophy and its Influence on Tang Naturalist Poetry. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (2):199-215.
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  24. David E. Mungello (1969). Neo-Confucianism and Wen-Jen Aesthetic Theory. Philosophy East and West 19 (4):367-383.
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  25. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Generativities: Western Philosophy, Chinese Painting, and the Yijing. Orbis Idearum 1 (1):97–104.
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  26. Angela Jung Palandri (1988). The Taoist Vision. A Study of T'ao Yuan-Ming's Nature Poetry. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (2):97-121.
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  27. An-yi Pan (2008). Shaping the Lotus Sutra: Buddhist Visual Culture in Medieval China – by Eugene Y. Wang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):182–185.
  28. Tom Rockmore (2004). Truth, Beauty, and the Social Function of Art. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):17–32.
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  29. Crispin Sartwell (2009). Dewey and Taoism: Teleology and Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (1):pp. 30-40.
  30. Crispin Sartwell (1993). Confucius and Country Music. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):243-254.
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  31. Ben-Ami Scharfstein (1976). Unless There Are Hills and Valleys in One's Breast: On the Inward Life of Chinese Landscape Painting. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (4):317-354.
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  32. Richard Sclafani (1977). Is the Tao of Chinese Aesthetics Like a Western Theory of Art? Some Issues in Comparative Aesthetics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (1):49-62.
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  33. Kwong-Loi Shun (1995). Confucian Ethics of the Axial Age: A Reconstruction Under the Aspect of the Breakthrough Toward Postconventional Thinking by Heiner Roetz. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):351-362.
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1 — 50 / 1829