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  1. A. (1974). Chinese Science: Explorations of an Ancient Tradition. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):805-805.
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  2. Douglas Allen & Ashok Kumar Malhotra (eds.) (1997). Culture and Self: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives, East and West. Westview Press.
    Traditional scholars of philosophy and religion, both East and West, often place a major emphasis on analyzing the nature of “the self.” In recent decades, there has been a renewed interest in analyzing self, but most scholars have not claimed knowledge of an ahistorical, objective, essential self free from all cultural determinants. The contributors to this volume recognize the need to contextualize specific views of self and to analyze such views in terms of the dynamic, dialectical relations between self and (...)
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  3. Robert E. Allinson (1998). Complementarity as a Model for East-West Integrative Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):505-517.
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  4. Robert E. Allinson (ed.) (1989). Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots. Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from Western philosophy. The book (...)
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  5. Wayne Alt (1996). Philosophical Sense and Classical Chinese Thought. Asian Philosophy 6 (2):155 – 160.
    A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought Chad Hansen, 1992 New York; Oxford University Press xvi + 448 pp., hb $65.00.
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  6. Roger T. Ames (2005). Getting Past the Eclipse of Philosophy in World Sinology: A Response to Eske Møllgaard. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):347-352.
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  7. Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.) (1995). Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    This book broadens the inquiry into emotion to comprehend a comparative cultural outlook. It begins with an overview of recent work in the West, and then proceeds to the main business of scrutinizing various relevant issues from both Asian and comparative perspectives. Original essays by experts in the field. Finally, Robert Solomon comments and summarizes.
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  8. Kyle David Anderson (2007). Chinese Theories of Reading and Writing: A Route to Hermeneutics and Open Poetics – by Ming Dong Gu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (4):631–634.
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  9. Yūichi Asano & Kunihiro Yuasa (eds.) (2004). Shoshi Hyakka "Saihakken" : Horiokosareru Kodai Chūgoku Shisō. Iwanami Shoten.
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  10. Hideo Baba (2008). Kei Kō No Shisō. Meiji Shoin.
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  11. Zong Baihua (2006). A Treatise on Origins and Foundations of Chinese and Western Painting. Filozofski Vestnik 27 (1):135-152.
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  12. Ba Bao (uuuu/2004). Zhouzi Tong Shu Xun Yi. Beijing Tu Shu Guan.
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  13. Walter Benesch (1993). The Euclidean Egg, the Three Legged Chinese Chicken. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (2):109-131.
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  14. John H. Berthrong (2008). Chinese (Confucian) Philosophical Theology. In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
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  15. John H. Berthrong (2006). To Catch a Thief: Zhu XI (1130–1200) and the Hermeneutic Art. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (s1):145-159.
  16. H. Gene Blocker (1996). Robert Cummings Neville, Normative Cultures. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (1):99-109.
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  17. Alfred H. Bloom (1989). The Privileging of Experience in Chinese Practical Reasoning. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 16 (3-4):297-307.
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  18. M. O. U. BO (2007). Introduction: Methodological Notes. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (4):465–471.
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  19. Calvin M. Boardman & Hideaki Kiyoshi Kato (2003). The Confucian Roots of Business Kyosei. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (4):317 - 333.
    Kyosei, a traditional Japanese concept, has been applied to a variety subjects, from biology to business. It has more recently become synonymous with the concepts of corporate responsibility, ethical decision making, stakeholder maximization, and responsible reciprocity. The purpose of this paper is to trace kyosei's modern business application back to ancient Confucian thought. The ideals associated with Confucianism were instrumental in the creation of Japanese business codes of ethics during the early part of the seventeenth century. A short history of (...)
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  20. Mary Bockover (2009). Philosophy : Teaching Chinese Philosophy From the Outside In. In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.
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  21. Freya Boedicker (2009). The Philosophy of Tai Chi Chuan: Wisdom From Confucius, Lao Tzu, and Other Great Thinkers. Blue Snake Books.
    Each chapter of this concise volume focuses on a single work or philosopher, and includes a short history of each one as well as a description of their ...
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  22. O. Brière (1965). Fifty Years of Chinese Philosophy, 1898-1948 [by] O. Brière. Translated From the French by Laurence G. Thompson. Praeger.
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  23. O. Brière (1965). Fifty Years of Chinese Philosophy, 1898-1948. Praeger.
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  24. Brian Bruya (2003). Qing (情) and Emotion in Early Chinese Thought. In Keli Fang (ed.), Chinese Philosophy and the Trends of the 21st Century Civilization. Commercial Press.
    In a 1967 article, A. C. Graham made the claim that 情 qing should never be translated as "emotions" in rendering early Chinese texts into English. Over time, sophisticated translators and interpreters have taken this advice to heart, and qing has come to be interpreted as "the facts" or "what is genuine in one." In these English terms all sense of interrelationality is gone, leaving us with a wooden, objective stasis. But we also know, again partly through the work of (...)
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  25. M. C. (1955). Historical Charts of Chinese Philosophy. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):158-158.
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  26. Kang Cao & Jean Hillier (2013). Deleuzian Dragons: Thinking Chinese Strategic Spatial Planning with Gilles Deleuze. Deleuze Studies 7 (3):390-405.
    As symbols of adaptability and transformation, together with qualities of vigilance and intelligence, we argue the relevance of dragons for spatial planning in China. We develop a metaphorical concept – the green dragon – for grasping the condition of contemporary Chinese societies and for facilitating the development of theories and practices of spatial planning which are able to face the challenges of rapid change. We ask Chinese scholars and spatial planners to liberate Deleuzian potential for strategic spatial planning in a (...)
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  27. Weidong Cao (2001). Communicative Rationality and Inter-Culturality: A Symposium with Jürgen Habermas. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):73-79.
  28. Edward S. Casey (2013). Opening Out the Boundaries: Homage to the Journal of Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (S1):12-16.
    “Borders” are impermeable limits designed to stop the flow of human beings as well as ideas across them, whereas “boundaries” are permeable enclosure that permit and often encourage movement through limits. I develop the differences between these two forms of edge with a series of historical and geographical examples. I conclude that the Journal of Chinese Philosophy is a sterling instance of a boundary whose entire being has consisted in facilitating the two-way flow of concepts and traditions across formerly closed (...)
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  29. Venant Cauchy (1994). Chinese and Oriental Approaches to Philosophy and Culture. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (1):61-66.
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  30. Venant Cauchy (1984). Le rôle de la philosophbe chinoise dans la pensée mondiale. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (3):199-202.
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  31. David Chai (2009). Musical Naturalism in the Thought of Ji Kang. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):151-171.
    Wei-Jin period is characterized by neo-Daoism ( xuanxue 玄學), and J I Kang lived in the midst of this philosophical exploration. Adopting the naturalism of the Zhuangzi , J i Kang expressed his socio-political concerns through the medium of music, which was previously regarded as having moral bearing and rectitude. Denying such rectitude became central for J i Kang, who claimed that music was incapable of possessing human emotion, releasing it from the chains of Confucian ritualism. His investigation into the (...)
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  32. Wing-Cheuk Chan (2003). Phenomenology of Technology: East and West. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (1):1–18.
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  33. Hao Chang (2004). Shi Dai de Tan Suo. Lian Jing Chu Ban Shi Ye Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  34. Jingpan Chen (1990). Confucius as a Teacher: Philosophy of Confucius with Special Reference to its Educational Implications. Foreign Languages Press.
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  35. Lai Chen (2009). Tradition and Modernity: A Humanist View. Brill.
    Retrospect and prospect for contemporary Chinese thought -- Resolving the tension between tradition and modernity : reflections on the May Fourth cultural tide -- The May Fourth tide and modernity -- Radicalism in the cultural movement of the twentieth century -- Modern Chinese culture and the difficulties of Confucian learning -- Liang Shuming's early view of Oriental and Western culture -- The establishment and development of Feng Youlan's view of culture -- A reflection on the new school of principle and (...)
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  36. Xunwu Chen (2010). Fate and Humanity. Asian Philosophy 20 (1):67 – 77.
    This essay examines the concept of fate, exploring the causal-normative constraint problem in the existential phenomenology of humanity in _A Dream of Red Mansions_. It studies the structure, content, and origin of the consciousness and experience of fate, as it is illustrated in the phenomenology in the novel, exploring the causal and normative challenges that fate poses to the reality, value, authenticity, happiness, and freedom of a person. Doing so, the essay also demonstrates both the difference and affinity between the (...)
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  37. Xunwu Chen (2004). Culture and Understanding: The Cartesian Suspicion, the Gadamerian Response, and the Confucian Outcome. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):389–403.
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  38. Anne Cheng (2005). The Problem with “Chinese Philosophy”. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 2:175-180.
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  39. Chung-Ying Cheng (2011). Preface: Kant and China: New Dimensions. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):503-504.
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  40. Chung-ying Cheng (2010). Preface. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):149-150.
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  41. Chung-Ying Cheng (2006). Toward Constructing a Dialectics of Harmonization: Harmony and Conflict in Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (s1):25-59.
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  42. Chung-Ying Cheng (1998). Comments on Three Papers for the Panel on Emotions. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (2):237-244.
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  43. Chung-Ying Cheng (1996). From Self-Cultivation to Philosophical Counseling. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (3):245-257.
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  44. Chung-Ying Cheng (1992). The "C" Theory: A Chinese Philosophical Approach to Management and Decision-Making. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 19 (2):125-153.
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  45. Chung-Ying Cheng (1984). On Professor Kegley's Individual and Community. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (3):217-226.
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  46. Hsueh-Li Cheng (1985). Confucianism and Zen (Ch'an) Philosophy of Education. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (2):197-215.
  47. Jie-Wei Cheng (1995). Deconstruction, Yin-Yang, and Negative Theology. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):263-287.
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  48. Chan-Fai Cheung (1999). Western Love, Chinese Qing a Philosophical Interpretation of the Idea of Love in Romeo and Juliet and the Butterfly Lover. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (4):469-488.
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  49. Matthew M. Chew (2009). Intercultural Interpretative Difficulties of Modern Chinese Intellectual Development: A Hermeneutical View. Asian Culture and History 1 (2):P34.
    This study is constituted by three components. The first will examine how Chinese scholars and Western sinologists have characterized modern Chinese intellectual history and what directions they have proposed for future intellectual development in China. The second section will construct a hermeneutic model of intercultural understanding and discuss its implications for the evaluation of modern Chinese intellectual development. I will show that an understanding of modern Chinese intellectual development in hermeneutical terms can circumventing many of the entrenched and misleading dichotomies (...)
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  50. T'ang Chun-I. (1959). The Development of Ideas of Spiritual Value in Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 9 (1/2):32-34.
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