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  1. Amy Allen (2007). The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens (Review). Hypatia 22 (2):200-204.
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  2. Laura Andronache (2006). A National Identity Republicanism? European Journal of Political Theory 5 (4):399-414.
    This article attempts to bring into discussion concepts from contemporary theories of republicanism from the vantage point of the particular theory of republican citizenship advocated by David Miller, and based on national identity. It emerges from the discussion of his notions of national identity and republican citizenship that he works with two parallel notions of political obligation: one that can be intimated from Miller’s Rousseauian vision of a political community as a community of common will, and another that can be (...)
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  3. Ulisses Araújo & Valéria Arantes (2009). The Ethics and Citizenship Program: A Brazilian Experience in Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 38 (4):489-511.
    This article describes the Ethics and Citizenship Program, a moral education project developed by the Brazilian government to promote education in ethics and citizenship in Brazilian fundamental and middle schools through four key themes: ethics, democratic coexistence, human rights and social inclusion. Some findings from a research project that investigated whether such a program did in fact promote the ethical and citizenship awareness of participating students are outlined. As an introduction to the paper's main concerns, the Brazilian socioeconomic context is (...)
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  4. Chris Armstrong & Andrew Mason (2011). Introduction: Democratic Citizenship and its Futures. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (5):553-560.
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  5. Kathleen B. Jones (1997). Introduction. Hypatia 12 (4):1-5.
  6. Etienne Balibar (2001). Outlines of a Topography of Cruelty: Citizenship and Civility in the Era of Global Violence. Constellations 8 (1):15-29.
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  7. Andrea Baumeister (2011). The Use of “Public Reason” by Religious and Secular Citizens: Limitations of Habermas' Conception of the Role of Religion in the Public Realm. Constellations 18 (2):222-243.
  8. Thomas Bender (1996). Clients or Citizens? Critical Review 10 (1):123-134.
    Abstract John McKnight's The Careless Society tellingly exposes the ways the professionalized welfare state creates dependency. But McKnight is too quick to condemn this result as the product of professional self?interest, and to posit as the alternative a selfless, republican model of community. He overlooks the more realistic possibility that the pursuit of their interests by social groups empowered to take care of themselves would better serve those interests, and would simultaneously create a feeling of interdependence and civic responsibility.
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  9. B. Berger (2010). Fear Itself: Civic War and the Corruption of the Citizen, by Peter Alexander Meyers. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008. 376 Pp. $29.00 (Hardcover). Governing Through Crime: How the War on Crime Transformed American Democracy and Created a Culture of Fear, by Jonathan Simon. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. 330 Pp. $29.99 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Political Theory 38 (2):291-299.
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  10. R. J. Berry (1999). Environmental Education, Ethics and Citizenship Conference, Held at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), 20 May 1998. Philosophy and Geography 2 (1):97 – 107.
    The search for a worldwide environmental ethic is linked to the increase in environmental concern since (particularly) the 1960s, and the recognition that environ mental problems can have a global impact. Numerous people and organizations have put forward their understanding of the necessary components of such an ethic and these have converged in a series of international statements ( Stockholm Declaration on the Human Environment , 1972; World Charter for Nature , 1982; Rio Declaration on Environment and Development , 1992; (...)
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  11. Camillo Bica (2007). Opposing a War and/or Supporting the Warrior: The Moral Obligations of Citizens in an Immoral War. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):627–643.
  12. Leora Bilsky (2008). Citizenship as Mask: Between the Imposter and the Refugee. Constellations 15 (1):72-97.
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  13. Jon Binnie (2009). Brenda Cossman, Sexual Citizens: The Legal and Cultural Regulation of Sex and Belonging. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 17 (1):115-119.
  14. Lawrence J. Biskowski (1996). Review: Poise and Good Measure: The Education of Citizens. [REVIEW] Political Theory 24 (1):120 - 128.
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  15. Alan Britton (2008). Review Of: Roth, K. & Burbules, NC 'Changing Notions of Citizenship Education in Contemporary Nation-States'. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Education 37 (2):257-270.
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  16. Nick Bromell (2013). Democratic Indignation: Black American Thought and the Politics of Dignity. Political Theory 41 (2):0090591712470627.
    This essay argues that black Americans writing from outside or at the margins of the democratic polity shed important light on the nature of human dignity and on the political emotion that offers—to oneself and to others—the surest proof of the existence of such dignity: indignation. I focus in particular on four insights of this body of black American political thought: that the presumption of dignity is the basis on which citizenship is conferred, while its denial is the justification by (...)
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  17. Cheshire Calhoun (2002). Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet: Lesbian and Gay Displacement. OUP Oxford.
    How has feminism failed lesbianism? What issues belong at the top of a lesbian and gay political agenda? This book answers both questions by examining what lesbian and gay subordination really amounts to. Calhoun argues that lesbians and gays aren't just socially and politically disadvantaged. The closet displaces lesbians and gays from visible citizenship, and both law and cultural norms deny lesbians and gay men a private sphere of romance, marriage, and the family.
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  18. David Carr (2006). The Moral Roots of Citizenship: Reconciling Principle and Character in Citizenship Education. Journal of Moral Education 35 (4):443-456.
    It seems often to have been thought that we need to make some kind of theoretical and/or practical choice between (liberal) moral, social and political conceptions of social order and citizenship focused on principles (rights and/or duties) and (communitarian or other) perspectives focused on virtue and character. This essay argues that no such tensions arise on a more universalistic virtue ethical conception of moral formation divorced from communitarian or other attachment to politics of local identity. In the course of making (...)
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  19. Andrés Fabián Henao Castro (2013). Antigone Claimed: “I Am a Stranger!” Political Theory and the Figure of the Stranger. Hypatia 28 (2):307-322.
    This paper seeks to destabilize the silent privilege given to the secured juridical-political position of the citizen as the stable site of enunciation of the problem/solution framework under which the stranger (foreigner, immigrant, refugee) is theoretically located. By means of textual, intertextual, and extratextual readings of Antigone, the paper argues that it is politically and literarily possible to (re)invent her for strangers in the twenty-first century, that is, for those symbolically produced as not-legally locatable and who resignify their ambivalent ontological (...)
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  20. Francesco Chiesa & Enzo Rossi (forthcoming). Contested Identities and Spatial Marginalization: The Case of Roma and Gypsy-Travelers in Wales. In Stefano Moroni & David Weberman (eds.), Space and Pluralism.
    In this paper we analyse the connection between the contested ethno-cultural labelling of Gipsy-Travellers in Wales and their position of social marginalisation, with special reference to spatial issues, such as the provision of campsites and public housing. Our main aim is to show how the formal and informal (mis)labelling of minority groups leads to a number of morally and politically questionable outcomes in their treatment on the part of political authorities. Our approach combines a close reading of official policy documents, (...)
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  21. Gary Clemitshaw (2010). Citizenship Without History? Knowledge, Skills and Values in Citizenship Education. Ethics and Education 3 (2):135-147.
    In this article I consider whether there is a process of repression occurring in definitions of citizenship and frameworks of citizenship education, which involves a forgetting of history. By focusing on recently troubled countries I identify how the force of history comes to play, and from that I consider how, in relatively stable liberal democracies such as England, the repression of history is more complete. I suggest that this repression leads to an impoverished definition of citizenship in terms of values (...)
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  22. Stephanie Collins & Holly Lawford-Smith (forthcoming). The Transfer of Duties: From Individuals to States and Back Again. In Michael Brady & Miranda Fricker (eds.), The Epistemic Life of Groups.
    Individuals sometimes pass their duties on to collectives, which is one way in which collectives can come to have duties. The collective discharges its duties by acting through its members, which involves distributing duties back out to individuals. Individuals put duties in and get (transformed) duties out. In this paper we consider whether (and if so, to what extent) this general account can make sense of states' duties. Do some of the duties we typically take states to have come from (...)
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  23. Lillian Corbin (2013). Australian Lawyers as Public Citizens. Legal Ethics 16 (1):57-72.
    While debate continues over the role of the lawyer in society, this article notes that the recently amended professional conduct rules of both barristers and solicitors and the proposed draft National Law prioritise the duty to the court and the administration of justice. In addition, the Australian Learning and Teaching Council's threshold learning outcomes for legal education corroborate these obligations when they assert that the role of a lawyer includes a professional responsibility to promote justice in service to the community. (...)
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  24. W. Corlett (2006). Book Review: Citizen-Saints: Shakespeare and Political Theology. [REVIEW] Political Theory 34 (5):657-659.
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  25. M. Victoria Costa (2009). Neo-Republicanism, Freedom as Non-Domination, and Citizen Virtue. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (4):401-419.
    This article discusses Philip Pettit’s neo-republicanism in light of the criterion of self-sustenance: the requirement that a political theory be capable of serving as a self-sustaining public philosophy for a pluralist democracy. It argues that this criterion can only be satisfied by developing an adequate politics of virtue. Pettit’s theory is built around the notion of freedom as non-domination, and he does not say much about the virtues of citizens or the policies the state may employ to encourage their development. (...)
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  26. Maria Cristina Moreno-Gutierrez & Susana Frisancho (2010). Transitions to Democracy: The Role of Moral and Citizenship Education in Latin America (Vol 38, Pg 391, 2009). Journal of Moral Education 39 (1):129-129.
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  27. George Crowder (2006). Homelessness, Citizenship, and Identity: The Uncanniness of Late Modernity. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):351-354.
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  28. Simon Cushing (1998). Citizenship, Political Obligation, and the Right-Based Social Contract. Dissertation, University of Southern California
    The contemporary political philosopher John Rawls considers himself to be part of the social contract tradition of John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Immanuel Kant, but not of the tradition of Locke's predecessor, Thomas Hobbes. Call the Hobbesian tradition interest-based, and the Lockean tradition right-based, because it assumes that there are irreducible moral facts which the social contract can assume. The primary purpose of Locke's social contract is to justify the authority of the state over its citizens despite the fact that (...)
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  29. Hartley Dean (2011). The Ethics of Migrant Welfare. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (1):18-35.
    International migration poses a dilemma for capitalist welfare states. This paper considers the ethical dimensions of that dilemma. It begins by addressing two questions associated with the provision of social rights for migrants: first, the extent to which differential forms of social citizenship may be associated with processes of civic stratification; second, the ambiguous nature of the economic, social and cultural rights components of the international human rights framework. It then proceeds to discuss, on the one hand, existing attempts to (...)
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  30. Jodi Dean (1997). Virtually Citizens. Constellations 4 (2):264-282.
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  31. Andrew Dobson (2006). Citizenship. In Andrew Dobson & Robyn Eckersley (eds.), Political Theory and the Ecological Challenge. Cambridge University Press
  32. Andrew Dobson (2003). Citizenship and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first book-length treatment of the relationship between citizenship and the environment. Andrew Dobson argues that ecological citizenship cannot be fully articulated in terms of the two great traditions of citizenship - liberal and civic republican - with which we have been bequeathed. He develops an original theory of citizenship, which he calls 'post-cosmopolitan', and argues that ecological citizenship is an example and an inflection of it. Ecological citizenship focuses on duties as well as rights, and these duties (...)
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  33. R. A. Duff (2005). Introduction: Crime and Citizenship. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (3):211–216.
  34. Speranta Dumitru (2014). From Birthright Citizenship to Open Borders? Some Doubts. Ethical Perspectives 21 (4):608-614.
    This paper argues that by overestimating the importance of citizenship rights, the ethics of immigration turns away from the more serious problem of closed borders. Precisely, this contribution is a threefold critique of Carens’ idea that "justice requires that democratic states grant citizenship at birth to the descendants of settled immigrants" (Carens, 2013: 20). Firstly, I argue that by making 'justice' dependent on states and their attributes (birthright citizenship), this idea strengthens methodological nationalism which views humanity as naturally divided into (...)
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  35. Speranta Dumitru (2012). Migration and Equality: Should Citizenship Levy Be a Tax or a Fine? Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (2):34-49.
    It is often argued that development aid can and should compensate the restrictions on migration. Such compensation, Shachar has recently argued, should be levied as a tax on citizenship to further the global equality of opportunity. Since citizenship is essentially a ‘birthright lottery’, that is, a way of legalizing privileges obtained by birth, it would be fair to compensate the resulting gap in opportunities available to children born in rich versus poor countries by a ‘birthright privilege levy’. This article sets (...)
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  36. Fernando Echeverría Rey (2008). Ciudadanos, Campesinos y Soldados: El Nacimiento de la Pólis Griega y la Teoría de la Revolución Hoplita. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas.
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  37. Sarah Fine & Lea Ypi (forthcoming). Migration in Political Theory: The Ethics of Movement and Membership. Oxford University Press.
    The volume addresses challenging and under-researched themes on the subject of migration. It debates the question of whether we ought to recognize a human right to immigrate, and whether it might be legitimate to restrict emigration. The authors critically examine criteria for selecting would-be migrants, and for acquiring citizenship. They discuss tensions between the claims of immigrants and existing residents, and tackle questions of migrant worker exploitation and responsibility for refugees. The book illustrates the importance of drawing on the tools (...)
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  38. P. Fisher (2012). Questioning the Ethics of Vulnerability and Informed Consent in Qualitative Studies From a Citizenship and Human Rights Perspective. Ethics and Social Welfare 6:2-17.
  39. Timothy Fowler (2013). Status of Child Citizens. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (1):1470594-13483482.
    This paper considers the place of children within liberal-democratic society and its related political morality. The genesis of the paper is two considerations which are in tension with one another. First, that there must be some point at which children are divided from adults, with children denied the rights which go along with full membership of the liberal community. The justification for the difference in the statue between these two groups must be rooted in some notion of capacities, since these (...)
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  40. James W. Fox Jr, Intimations of Citizenship: Repressions and Expressions of Equal Citizenship in the Era of Jim CROW.
    On first blush the Jim Crow Era may seem an odd place to locate anything meaningful about democratic, equal citizenship and the promise of the fourteenth amendment. This article argues to the contrary. The period of Jim Crow, in its negation of democratic citizenship, in fact reveals import aspects about the nature of democratic citizenship. This occurred in two ways. First, whites who implemented white supremacy implicitly understood that freedom and citizenship manifest themselves in a multiplicity of spheres, which is (...)
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  41. Marilyn Friedman (ed.) (2005). Women and Citizenship. OUP Usa.
    This highly interdisciplinary volume explores the political and cultural dimensions of citizenship and their relevance to women and gender. Containing essays by leading scholars such as Iris Marion Young, Alison Jaggar, Martha Nussbaum, and Sandra Bartky, it examines the conceptual issues and strategies at play in the feminist quest to give women full citizenship status. The contributors take a fresh look at issues, going beyond conventional critiques, and examining problems in the political and social arrangements, practices, and conditions that diminish (...)
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  42. Dario Gentili (2009). Topografie Politiche: Spazio Urbano, Cittadinanza, Confini in Walter Benjamin E Jacques Derrida. Quodlibet.
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  43. Farah Godrej (2012). Ascetics, Warriors, and a Gandhian Ecological Citizenship. Political Theory 40 (4):437 - 465.
    I argue here that a clearer conception of Gandhi's nonviolence is required in order to understand his resonance for contemporary environmentalism. Gandhi's nonviolence incorporates elements of both the brahmin or ascetic, as well as the ksatriya or warrior. Contemporary environmental movements by and large over-emphasize the self-abnegating, self-denying and self-scrutinizing ascetic components of Gandhi's thought, to the neglect of the confrontational and warrior-like ones. In so doing, they often also over-emphasize the ethical dimension of Gandhi's thought, missing the discursive political (...)
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  44. Ellen Grootegoed (2013). Between 'Choice' and 'Active Citizenship': Competing Agendas for Home Care in the Netherlands. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (2):198-213.
    Choice over home care has become an important pillar in the provision of publicly financed long-term care for people of all ages. In many European welfare states, cash-for-care schemes give care recipients greater choice over home care arrangements by allowing them to pay for care provided by acquaintances, friends and even family members. Paying for such informal care, however, is increasingly contested due to growing care needs, rising costs and the perceived need to tighten access to publicly funded care. Citizens (...)
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  45. Klaus Gunther (2005). World Citizens Between Freedom and Security. Constellations 12 (3):379-391.
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  46. Tim Hayward (2005). Citizenship and the Environment. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (4):473.
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  47. Peter Higgins (2007). Review of Benhabib, Seyla: The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens (Cambridge University Press, 2004). [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 8 (2):133-135.
  48. Bonnie Honig (2011). Review Article: The Politics of Ethos Stephen White The Ethos of a Late-Modern Citizen. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009. European Journal of Political Theory 10 (3):422-429.
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  49. Iseult Honohan & Marit Hovdal-Moan (2014). Introduction: Domination, Migration and Non-Citizens. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):1-9.
    In Europe and other regions of the world public debate concerning how many immigrants should be admitted, which rights those admitted should have, and which conditions can be required for access to citizenship is intense and enduring, and these have increasingly become central electoral issues. On the one hand, the harsh treatment of migrants is often a matter of public criticism; on the other hand, states are concerned about problems of welfare, security and social unrest that they have come to (...)
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  50. Marit Hovdal-Moan (2013). Unequal Residence Statuses and the Ideal of Non-Domination. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):1-20.
1 — 50 / 103