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  1. Michael Bayles (1970). The Justifiability of Civil Disobedience. Review of Metaphysics 24 (1):3 - 20.
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  2. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2007). Between Limited Democratisation and Limited Autocratisation. Political Development of the Ukrainian Society. In Roman Kozłowski & Karolina M. Cern (eds.), Etyka a współczesność [Ethics and Modernity]. Adam Mickiewicz University Press.
    The aim of this paper is to present political development of the Ukrainian society in years 1991-2004 in the light of conceptual apparatus of non-Marxian historical materialism.
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  3. S. C. (1972). The Morality of Civil Disobedience. Review of Metaphysics 26 (1):160-160.
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  4. Alan Carter (1998). In Defence of Radical Disobedience. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):29–47.
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  5. Stephen Cooke (2012). Animal Rights and Environmental Terrorism. Journal of Terrorism Research 4 (2):26-36.
    Many paradigmatic forms of animal rights and environmental activism have been classed as terrorism both in popular discourse and in law. This paper argues that the labelling of many violent forms of direct action carried out in the name of animal rights or environmentalism as ‘terrorism’ is incorrect. Furthermore, the claim is also made that even those acts which are correctly termed as terrorism are not necessarily wrongful acts. The result of this analysis is to call into question the terms (...)
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  6. Tyler Dawson (2010). 'The Whole World is Watching!' The 1968 Chicago Riots. Constellations 1 (2).
    In 1968, the Democratic Party of the United States held its convention in Chicago. Thousands of anti-war protestors arrived to picket the democratic process and voice their concerns over the Vietnam War for the upcoming presidential election. With prior knowledge of the coming protests, the Chicago Police Department and city administration expected violence and prepared themselves accordingly. As a result, the convention was plagued all week by violence in the streets as protestors clashed with the police. At the end, the (...)
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  7. Daniel M. Farrell (1977). Paying the Penalty: Justifiable Civil Disobedience and the Problem of Punishment. Philosophy and Public Affairs 6 (2):165-184.
  8. Rory Fidler (2011). LBJ, LBJ, How Many Kids Did You Ignore Today? Constellations 2 (2):133-143.
    The actual effectiveness of the American anti-war movement from 1964-68 and its attempts to sway the policy of President Johnson's administration on the topic of the Vietnam War is debatable. While popular myth has exaggerated the role of protestors in stopping the war, the movement failed to alter state policy on the war in any serious fashion. The anti-war movement could not develop a universal policy of their aims, differing from a gradual exit from Vietnam to a complete anarchist overthrow (...)
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  9. Roberto Gargarella (2012). Law and Social Protests. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):131-148.
    This paper deals with the relationship between law and social protests, a topic that seems particularly relevant at this time, when recent public events show the existence of growing tension between citizens and public officers. The paper does not explore the ultimate causes that triggered these social protests, but rather the normative and legal questions raised by these conflicts. The main question that it addresses is the following: How should the law act in the face of these growing expressions of (...)
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  10. Reiner Grundmann & Christos Mantziaris (1991). Fundamentalist Intolerance or Civil Disobedience? Strange Loops in Liberal Theory. Political Theory 19 (4):572-605.
    Sollen und Sein klaffen bei uns weiter auseinander als bei anderen, weil eben das Sollen sehr hoch gesetzt ist.Thomas Mann, Doctor Faustus.
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  11. C. Anthony Hunt (2004). Martin Luther King: Resistance, Nonviolence and Community. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (4):227-251.
    Martin Luther King, Jr drew upon his early grounding in family and church to forge a praxis of egalitarian justice in the rigidly segregated American South of his youth. King?s ethical outlook was eclectic, reflecting the influence of such figures as Mays, Davis, Rauschenbusch, Niebuhr, Thurman and Gandhi, alongside such doctrines as personalism and liberalism, nationalism and realism. Yet King?s subsequent academic study more nearly enhanced than restructured his early, formative exposure to black church and community. King became committed to (...)
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  12. David Lyons (1998). Moral Judgment, Historical Reality, and Civil Disobedience. Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (1):31–49.
  13. Leslie J. Macfarlane (1968). Justifying Political Disobedience. Ethics 79 (1):24-55.
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  14. Robert J. McLaughlin (1976). Socrates on Political Disobedience: A Reply to Gary Young. Phronesis 21 (3):185 - 197.
  15. Robert J. McLaughlin (1976). Socrates on Political Disobedience. Phronesis 21 (3):185-197.
  16. Nicholas Mowad (2012). History and Critique: A Response to Habermas's Misreading of Hegel. Clio 42 (1):53-72.
    Habermas has alleged: (1) that Hegel has given a social theory that is abstract and technical, separating theory from practice ; and (2) that the criticism Hegel exercises at times is compromised by his uncritical acceptance of modern western culture. Both allegations amount to the claim that in some way Hegel proscribes internal critique, a citizen’s critique of her own nation-state. However, this charge is based on a misunderstanding of the role that history plays in Hegel’s account, and the difference (...)
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  17. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2013). Rethinking Legitimate Authority. In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge.
    The just war-criterion of legitimate authority – as it is traditionally framed – restricts the right to wage war to state actors. However, agents engaged in violent conflicts are often sub-state or non-state actors. Former liberation movements and their leaders have in the past become internationally recognized as legitimate political forces and legitimate leaders. But what makes it appropriate to consider particular violent non-state actors to legitimate violent agents and others not? This article will examine four criteria, including ‘popular support (...)
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  18. William Smith (2010). Reclaiming the Revolutionary Spirit Arendt on Civil Disobedience. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (2):149-166.
    This article examines Hannah Arendt’s bold and provocative proposal to institutionalize civil disobedience. First, I argue that the proposal follows from Arendt’s peculiar interpretation of this mode of protest. She sees it as an unexpected yet welcome echo of the revolutionary spirit that accompanied the foundation of the American republic. In seeking to bring civil disobedience into government, she aims to embed this spirit within the very institutional fabric of the polity. Second, I suggest that we have strong reasons to (...)
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  19. William Smith (2008). Civil Disobedience and Social Power: Reflections on Habermas. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (1):72.
  20. Robert Streiffer, Lecture Outline:.
    If Dworkin’s theory of civil disobedience is right, then the scientists, given their objections, would not have been justified in civil disobedience. However, they could have been justified, had they chosen to object on grounds provided by just war theory or by an account of democratic legitimacy.
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  21. Mark Tunick (1998). Hegel on Justified Disobedience. Political Theory 26 (4):514-535.
    Hegel for the most part insists we support existing practices: they have endured, have socialized us, are our home. At times Hegel seems to demand conformity, to leave no room for dissent or disobedience. Hegel gives great weight to the authority of the state and of custom. But Hegel does not leave the individual confronted with an unjust state powerless. To Hegel, we are obligated to obey the law if we are at home in the state, if its practices, institutions (...)
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