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Siblings:History/traditions: Civil Society
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  1. J. C. Alexander (2013). The Arc of Civil Liberation Obama–Tahrir–Occupy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (4-5):341-347.
    Despite anxieties about the growing power of neo-liberalism, the crisis of the EU and the upsurge of right-wing political movements, it is important to recognize that utopian movements on the left have also in recent years been symbolically revitalized and organizationally sustained. This article analyses three recent social upheavals as utopian civil society movements, placing the 2008 US presidential campaign of Barack Obama, the Egyptian uprising in Tahrir Square and the Occupy Movement in the USA inside the narrative arc that (...)
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  2. R. T. Allen (1976). The State and Civil Society as Objects of Aesthetic Appreciation. British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (3):237-242.
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  3. L. Arvritzer (forthcoming). The Meaning and Employment of Civil Society in Brazil. Constellations.
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  4. Sholomo Avineri (1986). The Paradox of Civil Society in the Structure of Hegel's Views of Sittlichkeit. Philosophy and Theology 1 (2):157-172.
    The way in which much of the conventional interpretation has tried to describe the structure of Hegel’s civil society is inaccurate and one-dimensional. To Hegel civil society is not just the economic marketplace, where every individual tries to maximize his or her enlightened self-interest: side by side with the elements of universal strife and unending clash which are of the nature of civil society, there is another element which strongly limits and inhibits self-interest and transcendswhat would otherwise be a universal (...)
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  5. Leonardo Avritzer (1997). Introduction: The Meaning and Employment of 'Civil Society' in Latin America. Constellations 4 (1):88-93.
  6. Leonardo Avritzer, A. Olvera & H. Peruzzoti (1997). Special Section About Civil Society in Latin America. Constellations 4 (1):88-93.
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  7. Ryan K. Balot (2009). The Virtue Politics of Democratic Athens. In Stephen G. Salkever (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
  8. Michael Banner (2007). Christianity and Civil Society. In John Aloysius Coleman (ed.), Christian Political Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  9. Benjamin R. Barber (1999). Civil Society : Getting Beyond the Rhetoric. A Framework for Political Understanding. In Josef Janning, Charles Kupchan & Dirk Rumberg (eds.), Civic Engagement in the Atlantic Community. Bertelsmann Foundation Publishers.
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  10. Benjamin R. Barber (1996). An American Civic Forum: Civil Society Between Market Individuals and the Political Community. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (01):269-.
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  11. Chris Beckett (2013). Community Lost: The State. Civil Society and Displaced Survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (1):1-2.
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  12. Seyla Benhabib (1981). The "Logic" of Civil Society: A Reconsideration of Hegel and Marx. Philosophy and Social Criticism 8 (2):151-166.
  13. Lee Benson (2007). Dewey's Dream: Universities and Democracies in an Age of Education Reform: Civil Society, Public Schools, and Democratic Citizenship. Temple University Press.
    Introduction : Dewey's lifelong crusade for participatory democracy -- Michigan beginnings, 1884-1894 -- Dewey at the University of Chicago, 1894-1904 -- Dewey leaves the University of Chicago for Columbia University -- Elsie Clapp's contributions to community schools -- Penn and the third revolution in American higher education -- The Center for Community Partnerships -- The university civic responsibility idea becomes an international movement -- John Dewey, the Coalition for Community Schools, and developing a participatory democratic American society.
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  14. Lars Bo Kaspersen & Laila Ottesen (2001). Associationalism for 150 Years and Still Alive and Kicking: Some Reflections on Danish Civil Society. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (1):105-130.
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  15. Corey Brettschneider (2004). Nancy L. Rosenblum and Robert C. Post, Eds., Civil Society and Government:Civil Society and Government. Ethics 114 (2):374-376.
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  16. A. Brinton (2012). Association and Recognition in Authoritarian Societies: A Theoretical Beginning. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (3):324-347.
    This paper presents a theoretical sketch for how the existence of civic associations in authoritarian regimes might be analysed. By relating the concepts of ‘civil society’ and ‘recognition’, I explore how associations are a potential locus of mutual recognition in any society, democratic or undemocratic. While there are many theorizations of both civil society and recognition in relation to democratic political contexts, normative theories seeking to explain the existence of associations in authoritarian societies are less robustly developed. Recognition, more specifically (...)
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  17. Thomas Brockleman (2003). The Failure of the Radical Democratic Imaginary: I Ek Versus Laclau and Mouffe on Vestigial Utopia. Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (2).
    Starting from the author's critique of Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, this essay offers a comprehensive interpretation of Slavoj i ek's political theory. i ek's position drives a wedge between two concepts foundational to Laclau and Mouffe's 'radical democratic theory', namely 'antagonism' and 'anti-essentialism'. Anti-essentialism, it is argued, carries with it a residual utopianism - i.e. a view of political theory as offering a vision of a desirable radicalized society or a 'radical democratic imaginary' - that the more radical concept (...)
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  18. Stephen Eric Bronner (2006). Max Weber's Politics of Civil Society. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):91-93.
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  19. Michaelle L. Browers (2004). Arab Liberalisms: Translating Civil Society, Prioritising Democracy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (1):51-75.
    This article examines some of the earliest engagements of Arab thinkers with the now global idea of civil society. It focuses on Arab liberal thinkers who encounter ?civil society? as something that must be interpreted in order to be understood and view ?translation? as part of that process of interpretation. I argue that the ?transition phase? of contestation amidst loosely formulated, partially translated understandings of ?civil society? both proves productive for the transformation and appropriation of the concept, and reveals the (...)
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  20. Hauke Brunkhorst (2007). Globalizing Solidarity: The Destiny of Democratic Solidarity in the Times of Global Capitalism, Global Religion, and the Global Public. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (1):93–111.
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  21. Rob Burns (2010). Exodus Church and Civil Society: Public Theology and Social Theory in the Work of Jürgen Moltmann. By Scott R. Paeth. Heythrop Journal 51 (4):697-700.
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  22. Donald X. Burt (1963). St. Augustine's Evaluation of Civil Society. Augustinianum 3 (1):87-94.
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  23. Emanuela Ceva & Federico Zuolo, A Matter of Respect. On the Relation Between the Majority and Minorities in a Democracy.
    The relations between the majority and minorities in a democracy have been standardly viewed as the main subject matter of toleration: the majority should refrain from using its dominant position to interfere with some minorities’ practices or beliefs despite its dislike or disapproval of such practices or beliefs. Can the idea of toleration provide us with the necessary resources to understand and respond to the problems arising out of majority/minorities relations in a democracy? We reply in the negative and make (...)
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  24. Simone Chambers & Jeffrey Kopstein (2001). Bad Civil Society. Political Theory 29 (6):837-865.
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  25. Jonathan Chaplin (2010). Herman Dooyeweerd: Christian Philosopher of State and Civil Society. University of Notre Dame Press.
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  26. J. Cohen (1988). Discourse Ethics and Civil Society. Philosophy and Social Criticism 14 (3-4):315-337.
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  27. John Coleman (2007). A Limited State and a Vibrant Society : Christianity and Civil Society. In John Aloysius Coleman (ed.), Christian Political Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  28. Rory J. Conces (2010). Uloga Hiperintelektualca U Izgradnji Građanskog Društva I Demokratizacije Na Balkanu (The Role of the Hyperintellectual in Civil Society Building and Democratization in the Balklans). Dijalog 1:7-30.
    Riječ “intelektualac” francuskog je porijekla, nastala krajem 19. vijeka. Stvorena tokom afere Dreyfus, uglavnom se odnosi na one mislioce koji su spremni da interveniraju u javnom forumu, čak i ako to znači da sebe izlažu riziku (Le Sueur 2001:2). Teoretičari kao što su Edward Said, Paul Ricoeur, Jean-Paul Sartre i Michael Waltzer dali su doprinos diskusiji o intelektualcima: intelektualca Said vidi kao kritički nastrojenog autsajdera, Ricoeur kao političkog edukatora, Sartre kao čovjeka od akcije, a Waltzer kao brižnog insajdera. Opisati intelektualca (...)
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  29. Rory J. Conces (2008). All in Not Normal in Kosovo. The Serbia Observer (December 10):2.
  30. Rory J. Conces (2007). The Role of the Hyperintellectual in Civil Society Building and Democratization in the BALKans. Studies in East European Thought 59 (3):195 - 214.
    Although intellectuals have been a part of the cultural landscape, it is in post-conflict societies, such as those found in Kosovo and Bosnia, that there has arisen a need for an intellectual who is more than simply a social critic, an educator, a man of action, and a compassionate individual. Enter the hyperintellectual. As this essay will make clear, it is the hyperintellectual, who through a reciprocating critique and defense of both the nationalist enterprise and strong interventionism of the International (...)
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  31. M. Cooke (2008). Review Essay: Civil Society: An Incomplete(Able) Project (Under Consideration: Jeffrey C. Alexander's the Civil Sphere). Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (9):1095-1102.
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  32. David Crocker (1998). Transitional Justice and International Civil Society: Toward a Normative Framework. Constellations 5 (4):492-517.
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  33. Nythamar de Oliveira (2004). Globalization and Democratization in Brazil: An Interpretation of Rawls's Political Liberalism. Civitas 4 (1):39-55.
  34. J. Dean (1992). Including Women: The Consequences and Side Effects of Feminist Critiques of Civil Society. Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (3-4):379-406.
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  35. Jean-Philippe Deranty (2000). The 'Son of Civil Society': Tensions in Hegel's Account of Womanhood. Philosophical Forum 31 (2):145–162.
    The paper examines briefly Kant's and Fichte's, and more thoroughly, Hegel's theses on womanhood and their social and political consequences. It shows, taking Hegel as a case study, that the idealists' conceptual frameworks should have led them to recognize the rights of women, and, importantly, in Kant's and Hegel's case, that they implicitly did so. However, they chose to repress these unwanted outcomes behind teachings that were more in line with the beliefs of their time. This tension, it is argued (...)
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  36. R. S. Downie (1967). An Essay on the History of Civil Society (1767). By Adam Ferguson. Edited with an Introduction by Duncan Forbes. (Edinburgh University Press, 1966. Pp. Xli + 290. Price 42s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 42 (162):382-.
  37. Jay Drydyk (1991). Capitalism, Socialism, and Civil Society. The Monist 74 (3):457-477.
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  38. Homas Evartenberg (1981). Poverty and Class Structure in Hegel's Theory of Civil Society. Philosophy and Social Criticism 8 (2):169-182.
    Hegel's handling of the phenomenon of poverty has often been seen as an important virtue of his theory of civil society. In this paper, It is argued that Hegel's discussion of this phenomenon reveals a critical weakness of his theory of civil society, i.e., the failure of his theory to take account of the actual class structure of that society. Hegel's official theory of the classes in civil society is shown to neglect the actual development of a class structure within (...)
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  39. Paul Fairfield (1999). The Political Economy of Civil Society and Human Rights. Symposium 3 (2):283-285.
  40. G. A. Fine (2007). Rumor, Trust and Civil Society: Collective Memory and Cultures of Judgment. Diogenes 54 (1):5-18.
    Contemporary societies are awash in rumor. Truth claims may have an uncertain provenance, but we tend to incorporate them into our belief system, act upon them, and recall them through collective memory. The question becomes who, what, where and when do we trust. The analysis of rumor belongs to the sociology of action. This paper sketches a brief analysis of the intersection of trust and rumors through the concepts of plausibility, credibility, frequency, diffusion, boundaries, divisiveness and stability or rumor. The (...)
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  41. Gary Alan Fine & Brooke Harrington (2004). Tiny Publics: Small Groups and Civil Society. Sociological Theory 22 (3):341-356.
    It has been conventional to conceptualize civic life through one of two core images: the citizen as lone individualist or the citizen as joiner. Drawing on analyses of the historical development of the public sphere, we propose an alternative analytical framework for civic engagement based on small-group interaction. By embracing this micro-level approach, we contribute to the debate on civil society in three ways. By emphasizing local interaction contexts-the microfoundations of civil society-we treat small groups as a cause, context, and (...)
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  42. Christopher J. Finlay (2004). Hume's Theory of Civil Society. European Journal of Political Theory 3 (4):369-391.
    This article interprets David Hume’s social and political thought as a ‘theory of civil society’, arguing that as such it constituted an important challenge to the civic humanism of much early 18th-century British political argument. Since republican theorists invoke the historical traditions of civic thought in current debates, Hume’s theory of civil society therefore is of especial interest in relation to the foundations of contemporary neo-republicanism. The first part argues that, in A Treatise of Human Nature, by analysing various different (...)
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  43. Lorenzo Fioramonti (2005). Civil Societies and Democratization: Assumptions, Dilemmas and the South African Experience. Theoria 44 (107):65-88.
    The argument put forward by this article is not that democratization does not benefit from the activity of a vibrant civil society, but rather that academic research should address this relationship in a critical way. This article maintains that one should take care to distinguish between 'civil society' as an ideal-type concept that embodies the qualities of separation, autonomy and civil association in its pure form, and the factual world of 'civil societies' composed of associations that embody these principles to (...)
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  44. Robert K. Fullinwider (1995). Citizenship, Individualism, and Democratic Politics. Ethics 105 (3):497-515.
    Examines liberalism's conception of individuals and society. Individualism and politics; Liberalism and the displacement of politics; Radical politics and civic individualism. Examines liberalism's conception of individuals and society. Individualism and politics; Liberalism and the displacement of politics; Radical politics and civic individualism.
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  45. Regenia Gagnier (2009). Individualism, Civilization, and National Character in Market Democracies. In Jack Amariglio, Joseph W. Childers & Stephen Cullenberg (eds.), Sublime Economy: On the Intersection of Art and Economics. Routledge.
  46. William A. Galston (1999). Social Capital in America : Civil Society and Civic Trust. In Josef Janning, Charles Kupchan & Dirk Rumberg (eds.), Civic Engagement in the Atlantic Community. Bertelsmann Foundation Publishers.
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  47. Karamjit S. Gill (1994). Information Society and Cohesion: Diversity or Integration? [REVIEW] AI and Society 8 (2):95-96.
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  48. Robert E. Goodin (2000). Democratic Deliberation Within. Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (1):81–109.
  49. San-Jin Han (2001). Modernization and the Rise of Civil Society: The Role of the “Middling Grassroots” for Democratization in Korea. [REVIEW] Human Studies 24 (1-2):113-132.
    This paper attempts to explain why and how the middle class in Korea decisively joined the democratic movement in 1987 by drawing special attention to the role played by the middling grassroots (MG). MG was formed out of the common experience of student activism and contesting subcultures, which were widely dispersed over Korean university campuses during the 1980s. In addition, this paper examines the contrasting views on the Korean democratic transition by Bruce Cumings and Adam Przeworski. This substantive analysis attempts (...)
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  50. Michael Hardt & Antonio Negri (1996). Postmodern Law and the Withering of Civil Society. Angelaki 1 (3):57 – 72.
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