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  1. George L. Abernethy (1942). Book Review:Left-Wing Democracy in the English Civil War: A Study of the Social Philosophy of Gerrard Winstanley. David W. Petergorsky. [REVIEW] Ethics 52 (3):378-.
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  2. D. R. Shackleton Bailey (1960). The Roman Nobility in the Second Civil War. Classical Quarterly 10 (3-4):253-.
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  3. Verónica Sierra Blas (2011). The Kiss of Death: Farewell Letters From the Condemned to Death in Civil War and Postwar Spain. The European Legacy 16 (2):167-187.
    Right from the start of the Spanish Civil War, thousands of prisoners were executed by shooting. Today, many of them remain anonymous, but others, thanks to their writing, have passed into history. In the final hours before their execution, these men and women had the chance to write a few farewell letters to their nearest and dearest. These letters, known by historians as ?chapel letters,? passed either through official channels exercising prior censorship or else were sent clandestinely. In their farewell (...)
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  4. Helga Botermann (1980). Dignitatis Contentio. Studies on Motives and Political Tactics During the Civil War Between Caesar and Pompey. Philosophy and History 13 (2):226-228.
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  5. Percy H. Boynton (1934). Book Review:The Great Tradition, An Interpretation of American Literature Since the Civil War. Granville Hicks. [REVIEW] Ethics 44 (4):471-.
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  6. Adam Branch (2007). Uganda's Civil War and the Politics of ICC Intervention. Ethics and International Affairs 21 (2):179–198.
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  7. Jacqueline Broad, Liberty and the Right of Resistance: Women's Political Writings of the English Civil War Era.
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  8. Ian Clark (1988). Waging War: A Philosophical Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    What is war, and how should it be waged? Are there restraints on its conduct? What can philosophers contribute to the study of warfare? Arguing that the practice of war requires a sound philosophical understanding, Ian Clark writes a fascinating synthesis of the philosophy, history, political theory, and contemporary strategy of warfare. Examining the traditional doctrines of the "just" and the "limited" war with fresh insight, Clark also addresses the applicability of these ideas to the modern issues of war crimes, (...)
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  9. Raphael Cohen-Almagor (1991). Foundations of Violence, Terror and War in the Writings of Marx, Engels, and Lenin. Terrorism and Political Violence 3 (2).
    The aims of this essay are (A) to examine the extent to which Marx, Engels and Lenin believed in revolution by peaceful means and what was their attitude towards the phenomenon of war, and (B) to reflect on the different interpretations of their writings, discerning between three schools of thought. It is argued that Marx and Engels considered violence only as an instrument of secondary importance and desirable insofar as there is no other alternative to change the system. It is (...)
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  10. Steven Conn (2002). Narrative Trauma and Civil War History Painting, or Why Are These Pictures so Terrible? History and Theory 41 (4):17–42.
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  11. Bob Cowan (2010). Statius and the Telchines (C.) McNelis Statius' Thebaid and the Poetics of Civil War. Pp. X + 203. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Cased, £50, US$90. ISBN: 978-0-521-86741-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):133-.
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  12. E. Dench (1998). Actium and Augustus: The Politics and Emotions of Civil War. R A Gurval. The Classical Review 48 (2):398-399.
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  13. Lawrence Dennis (1980/1975). The Dynamics of War and Revolution. Institute for Historical Review.
  14. Ned Dobos (2008). Rebellion, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Prudential Constraints on War. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (2):102-115.
    Both radical rebellion and humanitarian intervention aim to defend citizens against tyranny and human rights abuses at the hands of their government. The only difference is that rebellion is waged by the oppressed subjects themselves, while humanitarian intervention is carried out by foreigners on their behalf. In this paper, it is argued that the prudential constraints on war (last resort, probability of success, and proportionality) impose tighter restrictions on, or demand more of, humanitarian interveners than they do of rebels. Specifically, (...)
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  15. William J. Dominik (2000). Flavian Epic Donald T. McGuire: Acts of Silence: Civil War, Tyranny and Suicide in the Flavian Epics . (Altertumswissenchaftliche Texte Und Studien, 33.) Pp. XV + 256. Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 1997. Paper, Dm 58. Isbn: 3-487-10334-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):60-.
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  16. Heinz Duchhardt (1984). Revolution and Universal Civil War. Studies on the Overture After 1789. Philosophy and History 17 (1):86-86.
  17. Jost Düllfer (1989). The European Civil War, 1917–1945. National Socialism and Bolshevism. Philosophy and History 22 (2):197-199.
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  18. N. R. E. Fisher (1983). Stasis Andrew Lintott: Violence, Civil Strife and Revolution in the Classical City 750–330 B.C. Pp. 289. London: Croom Helm, 1982. £13.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (02):255-257.
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  19. Charles R. Gallagher (2011). Gunpowder and Incense: The Catholic Church and the Spanish Civil War. By Hilari Raguer. Translated by Gerald Howson. Heythrop Journal 52 (3):529-530.
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  20. M. A. Gareev (1998). If War Comes Tomorrow?: The Contours of Future Armed Conflict. Frank Cass.
    Military affairs have been affected by major changes in the 19902. The bipolar world of two superpowers has gone. The Cold War and the global military confrontation that accompanied it have ended. A new military and political order has emerged, but the world has not become more stable, indeed, wars and armed conflict have become much more common. Forecasting the contours of future armed conflict is the primary object of this work. Focusing on the impact of new technologies, General Gareev (...)
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  21. Ian Green (1991). Repulsives Vs Wromantics" : Rival Views of the English Civil War. In Ciaran Brady & Iván Berend (eds.), Ideology and the Historians: Papers Read Before the Irish Conference of Historians, Held at Trinity College, Dublin, 8-10 June 1989. Lilliput Press.
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  22. G. T. Griffith & A. Lintott (1984). Violence, Civil Strife and Revolution in the Classical City 750-330 BC. Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:237.
  23. E. G. Hardy (1909). Henderson's Civil War and Rebellion Civil War and Rebellion in the Roman Empire. A Companion to the Histories of Tacitus. By Bernard W. Henderson, M.A., Sub-Rector and Tutor of Exeter College, Oxford. London: Macmillan & Co. 1908. 8vo. Pp. Xxiii + 360. Four Illustrations From Busts, Maps and Plans. [REVIEW] Classical Quarterly 3 (02):137-.
  24. Peter Uwe Hohendahl (2012). Revolutionary War and Absolute Enemy: Rereading Schmitt's Theory of the Partisan. Constellations 18 (4):529-544.
  25. D. M. Hooley (1999). In-Fighting John Henderson: Fighting for Rome. Poets & Caesars, History & Civil War . Pp. X + 349. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-521-58026-9. John Henderson: Figuring Out Roman Nobility: Juvenal's Eighth Satire (Exeter Studies in History). Pp. Viii + 168. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1997. Paper, £9.95. ISBN: 0-85989-517-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (01):95-.
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  26. Stathis N. Kalyvas (2004). The Paradox of Terrorism in Civil War. Journal of Ethics 8 (1):97-138.
    A great deal of violence in civil wars is informed by the logic of terrorism: violence tends to be used by political actors against civilians in order to shape their political behavior. I focus on indiscriminate violence in the context of civil war: this is a type of violence that selects its victims on the basis of their membership in some group and irrespective of their individual actions. Extensive empirical evidence suggests that indiscriminate violence in civil war is informed by (...)
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  27. George Klay Kieh (forthcoming). Humanitarian Intervention in Civil Wars in Africa. Ethics and International Affairs: Theories and Cases. Lanham, Md: Rowman and Littlefield.
  28. Sergio Koc-Menard (2004). Just War Tradition, Liberalism, and Civil War. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (2):57-64.
    The just war tradition assumes that civil war is a possible site of justice. It has an uneasy relationship with liberalism, because the latter resists the idea that insurgency and counterinsurgency can be justified in moral terms. The paper suggests that, even if this is true, these two schools of thought are closer to each other than often appears to be the case. In particular, the paper argues that insurgency and counterinsurgency can be justified using the liberal assumptions that nonviolent (...)
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  29. Sam Koon (2009). Caesar (W.W.) Batstone, (C.) Damon Caesar's Civil War. Pp. Xiv + 225, Fig., Maps. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Paper, £11.99 (Cased, £45). ISBN: 978-0-19-516511-1 (978-0-19-516510-4 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):113-.
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  30. Cécile Lavergne (2011). Questioning the Moral Justification of Political Violence: Recognition Conflicts, Identities and Emancipation. Critical Horizons 12 (2):211-231.
    Basing its understanding on the two uses of the notion of violence in Honneth’s theory of recognition, this paper aims at developing a framework for the analysis of the thesis of the moral justification of political violence, whenever forms of political violence can be defined as legitimate struggles of recognition. Its contention is that the requalification of some forms of collective violence as recognition conflicts makes it possible to establish a hierarchy of justification for forms of violence which cannot be (...)
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  31. D. S. Levene (1997). J. M. Carter: Julius Caesar. The Civil War Book III. Pp. 256, 3 Maps. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1993. £35 (Paper, £14.95). ISBN: 0-85668-582-8 (0-85668-58306 Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (02):423-424.
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  32. A. W. Lintott (1971). Lucan and the History of the Civil War. Classical Quarterly 21 (02):488-.
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  33. Patrick Madigan (2010). Thomas White and the Blackloists: Between Politics and Theology During the English Civil War (Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700). By Stefania Tutino. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (1):138-139.
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  34. J. Masters (1999). Review. Ideology in Cold Blood: A Reading of Lucan's Civil War. S Bartsch. The Classical Review 49 (2):401-402.
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  35. Roland Mayer (1990). P. F. Widdows: Lucan's Civil War. Pp. Xxv + 294; 6 Maps. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1988. $47.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (01):157-158.
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  36. Thomas McCoog (2013). Jesuit Civil Wars: Theology, Politics and Government Under Tirso González (1687–1705). By Jean‐Pascal Gay. Pp. Ix, 323, Farnham, Ashgate, 2012, Catholic Christendom Series, £70.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (3):517-518.
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  37. Colleen Murphy & Linda Radzik (2013). Jus Post Bellum and Political Reconciliation. In Larry May & Elizabeth Edenberg (eds.), Jus Post Bellum and Transitional Justice. Cambridge.
  38. Ellen O'Gorman (2002). Tacitus on Civil War R. Ash: Ordering Anarchy. Armies and Leaders in Tacitus' Histories. Pp. IX + 246. London: Duckworth, 1999. Cased, £40. Isbn: 0-7156-2800-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (01):75-.
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  39. William Pencak (2001). The Civil War Did Not Take Place. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (2):7-29.
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  40. Simon Pirani (2003). Class Clashes with Party: Politics in Moscow Between the Civil War and the New Economic Policy. Historical Materialism 11 (2):75-120.
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  41. Charles Post (2011). Social-Property Relations, Class-Conflict and the Origins of the US Civil War: Towards a New Social Interpretation. Historical Materialism 19 (4):58-97.
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  42. Gregory Reichberg & Henrik Syse (2006). Thucydides, Civil War, and Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (4):241-242.
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  43. Andrew Robinson (2008). Books for Burning: Between Civil War and Democracy in 1970s Italy. Historical Materialism 16 (3):179-194.
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  44. Leslie A. Schwalm (2011). Surviving Wartime Emancipation: African Americans and the Cost of Civil War. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (1):21-27.
    The U.S. Civil War chained slave emancipation to war's violence, destruction and deprivation. The resulting health crisis, including illness, injury, and trauma, had immediate and lasting consequences. This essay explores the impact of ideas about race on the U.S. military's health care provisions and treatment of former slaves, both civilians and soldiers.
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  45. Ibrahim Seaga Shaw (2011). The Politics of Humanitarian Intervention: A Critical Analogy of the British Response to End the Slave Trade and the Civil War in Sierra Leone. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (3):273-285.
    A leading scholar of humanitarian intervention, Brown (2002) refers to British internal politics to satisfy the influential church and other non-conformist libertarian community leaders, and above all ?undermining Britain's competitors, such as Spain and Portugal, who were still reliant on slave labour to power their economies, as the principal motivation for calls to end the slave trade than any genuine humanitarian concerns of racial equality or global justice?. Drawing on an empirical exploration, this article seeks to draw a parallel between (...)
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  46. J. H. Simon (1961). Caesar's Civil War. The Classical Review 11 (02):134-.
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  47. Robin Sowerby (2000). C. A. Brown, C. Martindale (Edd.): Lucan: The Civil War. Translated as Lucan's Pharsalia by Nicholas Rowe . Pp. Lxxix + 444. London: Everyman, 1998. Paper, £6.99. ISBN: 0-460-87571-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (02):603-.
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  48. P. G. Walsh (1978). The Civil War: Virgil Versus Lucan Giorgio Guido: Petronio Arbitro, Dal 'Satyricon': Il 'Bellum Civile'. Testo, TraduzioneeCommento. Pp. 368. Bologna: Pàtron, 1976. Paper, L. 11,700. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):41-42.
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  49. Kenneth Wellesley (1992). J. M. Carter (Ed., Tr.): Julius Caesar, The Civil War, Books I & II. Edited with an Introduction, Translation and Commentary. (Classical Texts.) Pp. Vii + 242; 3 Maps. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1991. £32 (Paper, £12.50). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (02):446-447.
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  50. H. D. Westlake (1983). Athens After the Civil War. The Classical Review 33 (02):260-.
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