You are accessing PhilPapers from Open University (UK), an institution that is not subscribed to PhilPapers. Starting on July 1, 2014, we ask institutions that grant philosophy degrees and are based in high-GDP countries to contribute to PhilPapers' maintenance and development through a subscription. See this page for details. Please show your support by contacting your librarian.
Related categories
Subcategories:
1072 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 1072
Material to categorize
  1. Brooke A. Ackerly (2005). Is Liberalism the Only Way Toward Democracy? Confucianism and Democracy. Political Theory 33 (4):547 - 576.
    This article identifies a foundation for Confucian democratic political thought in Confucian thought. Each of the three aspects emphasized is controversial, but supported by views held within the historical debates and development of Confucian political thought and practice. This democratic interpretation of Confucian political thought leads to (1) an expectation that all people are capable of ren and therefore potentially virtuous contributors to political life; (2) an expectation that the institutions of political, social, and economic life function so as to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Roger T. Ames (2011). Confucian Role Ethics: A Vocabulary. The Chinese University Press.
  3. James Behuniak & Roger T. Ames (eds.) (2005). Mengzi Xin Xing Zhi Xue. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Degui Cai (2009). Kongzi Vs Jidu. Shi Jie Zhi Shi Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Confucius[From Old Catalog], Kramers, Robert Paul, [From Old Catalog] & Su Wang (eds.) (1950). Kʻung Tsŭ Chia Yü. Leiden, E. J. Brill.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Wai Wai Chiu (2013). Jian Ai and the Mohist Attack of Early Confucianism. Philosophy Compass 8 (5):425-437.
    In Chinese pre-Qin period, Mohism was the first school that challenged Confucianism. A common view is that Mohists attacked Confucianism by proposing jian ai, often translated as “universal love,” that opposes Confucian “graded love”. The Confucian-Mohist debate on ethics is often regarded as a debate between Mohist “universal love,” on the one hand; and Confucian emphasis on family and kinship, on the other. However, it is misleading to translate jian ai as “universal love,” as it distorts our understanding of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jonathan Clements (2004/2008). Confucius: A Biography. Sutton Pub..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Confucius, Analects.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Confucius, Analects of Confucius, the (From the Chinese Classics).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Confucius, Confucius Publishing Co. Ltd.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Confucius, Confucius Texts.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Confucius, Doctrine of the Mean.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Confucius, Great Learning.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Confucius, Sayings.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Confucius, The Analects.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Confucius, The Doctrine of the Mean.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Confucius, The Great Learning.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Confucius (1968). The Wisdom of Confucius. New York, Philosophical Library; [Distributed by Book Sales, Inc..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Confucius (1950). The Best of Confucius. Garden City, N.Y.,Halcyon House.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Confucius (1950). The Best of Confucius. Garden City, N.Y.,Halcyon House.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Confucius (1950). The Best of Confucius. Garden City, N.Y.,Halcyon House.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Confucius (1950). The Best of Confucius. Garden City, N.Y.,Halcyon House.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Confucius (1950). The Best of Confucius. Garden City, N.Y.,Halcyon House.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Confucius (1942). The Living Thoughts of Confucius. Toronto [Etc.]Cassell and Company, Limited.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Russell Arben Fox (2008). Activity and Communal Authority: Localist Lessons From Puritan and Confucian Communities. Philosophy East and West 58 (1):36-59.
    : Puritanism and Confucianism have little in common in terms of their substantive teachings, but they do share an emphasis on bounded, authoritative, localized human arrangements, and this profoundly challenges the dominant presumptions of contemporary globalization. It is not enough to say that these worldviews are ‘‘communitarian’’ alternatives to globalism, for that defines away what needs to be explained. This article compares the ontology of certain elements of the Puritan and Confucian worldviews, and, by focusing on the role of both (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Nicholas F. Gier (2001). The Dancing Ru: A Confucian Aesthetics of Virtue. Philosophy East and West 51 (2):280-305.
    The most constructive response to the crisis in moral theory has been the revival of virtue ethics, which has the advantages of being personal, contextual, and, as will be argued, normative as well. It is also proposed that the best way to refound virtue ethics is to return to the Greek concept of technē tou biou, literally "craft of life." The ancients did not distinguish between craft and fine art, and the meaning of technē, even in its Latin form, ars, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Ranjoo Seodu Herr (2010). Confucian Democracy and Equality. Asian Philosophy 20 (3):261-282.
    “Confucian democracy” is considered oxymoronic because Confucianism is viewed as lacking an idea of equality among persons necessary for democracy. Against this widespread opinion, this article argues that Confucianism presupposes a uniquely Confucian idea of equality and that therefore a Confucian conception of democracy distinct from liberal democracy is not only conceptually possible but also morally justifiable. This article engages philosophical traditions of East and West by, first, reconstructing the prevailing position based on Joshua Cohen’s political liberalism; second, articulating a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Ranjoo Seodu Herr (2010). Confucianism's Political Implications for the Modern World. In Miguel Vatter (ed.), Crediting God: The Fate of Religion and Politics in the Age of Global Capitalism.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ranjoo Seodu Herr (2003). Is Confucianism Compatible with Care Ethics? A Critique. Philosophy East and West 53 (4):471-489.
    This essay critically examines a suggestion proposed by some Confucianists that Confucianism and Care Ethics share striking similarities and that feminism in Confucian societies might take “a new form of Confucianism.” Aspects of Confucianism and Care Ethics that allegedly converge are examined, including the emphasis on human relationships, and it is argued that while these two perspectives share certain surface similarities, moral injunctions entailed by their respective ideals of ren and caring are not merely distinctive but in fact incompatible.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Heather E. Keith (2009). Transforming Ren: The De of George Herbert Mead's Social Self. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):69-84.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ha Tai Kim (1972). Transcendence Without and Within: The Concept of T'ien in Confucianism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (3):146 - 160.
  32. Sungmoon Kim (2010). On Korean Dual Civil Society: Thinking Through Tocqueville and Confucius. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (4):434.
  33. Shiu Loon Kong (2009). Confucian Wisdom for the 21st Century: A Selected Rendition. The Chinese University Press.
    This book is a rendition of selected parts of The Four Books, focusing on the nature and morality of man, the education process, and the perfect personality, ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Karyn Lai (2008). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This comprehensive introductory textbook to early Chinese philosophy covers a range of philosophical traditions which arose during the Spring and Autumn (722-476 BCE) and Warring States (475-221 BCE) periods in China, including Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism. It considers concepts, themes and argumentative methods of early Chinese philosophy and follows the development of some ideas in subsequent periods, including the introduction of Buddhism into China. The book examines key issues and debates in early Chinese philosophy, cross-influences between its traditions and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Seung-Hwan Lee, Virtues and Rights : Reconstruction of Confucianism as a Rational Communitarianism.
    Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1991.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Shui Chuen Lee (2011). W Ong Wai-Ying 黃慧英, Confuican Ethics: Ti and Yong 儒家倫理:體與用. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):263-268.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Yuli Liu (2004). The Self and Li in Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):363–376.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Yuli Liu (2004). The Unity of Rule and Virtue: A Critique of a Supposed Parallel Between Confucian Ethics and Virtue Ethics. Eastern Universities Press.
  39. P. -C. Lo (2010). A Confucian Philosophy of Medicine and Some Implications. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (4):466-476.
    Two crucial topics in the philosophy of medicine are the philosophy of nature and philosophical anthropology. In this essay I engage the philosophy of nature by exploring Anne Fagot-Largeault's study of norms in nature as a way of articulating a Confucian philosophy of medicine. I defend the Confucian position as a moderate naturalism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Yuet Keung Lo (2008). Transmitters and Creators: Chinese Commentators and Commentaries on the Analects – by John Makeham. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):179–182.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Roderick Long, Rituals of Freedom: Austro-Libertarian Themes in Early Confucianism.
    Philosophy – Auburn University 8th Austrian Scholars Conference 15-16 March 2002 longrob@auburn.edu..
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. S. Gale Lowrie (1933). Book Review:Political Philosophy Of Confucianism: An Interpretation of the Social and Political Ideas of Confucius, His Forerunners, and His Early Disciples. Leonard Shihlien Hsu. [REVIEW] Ethics 43 (3):367-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Martin Lu (1983). Confucianism: Its Relevance to Modern Society. Federal Publications.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Martin Wu-Chi Lu (1994). The Confucian, Taoist and Augustinian Approaches to Truth and Their Contemporary Implications. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (1):71-92.
  45. Xiufen Lu (2011). Rethinking Confucian Friendship. Asian Philosophy 20 (3):225-245.
    It has been argued that friendship in the Confucian tradition is ultimately reducible to family relationships and, since all family relationships in the Confucian world are hierarchical, friendship (thus conceived and patterned as a family relationship) would also be hierarchical. In opposition to this view, it also has been argued that among the five primary relationships discussed by Confucians, friendship is the only one that could be non-hierarchical, and because of that, friendship is considered dangerous among Confucians. I argue that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Zhaolu Lu (2001). Fiduciary Society and Confucian Theory of Xin - on Tu Wei-Ming's Fiduciarity Proposal. Asian Philosophy 11 (2):85 – 101.
    This paper evaluates Tu Wei-ming's proposal that the Confucian ideal model of human society should be viewed as a fiduciary community. To do the evaluation, I provide a systematic elaboration of Tu's proposal, which is essentially absent in Tu's writings, and a systematic explication of the Confucian theory of fiduciarity, which is supposed to be the theoretical foundation of Tu's proposal but is completely absent in the studies of Confucianism, including Tu's own. On the basis of these studies, I conclude (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Zhaolu Lu (1999). The Mencian Theory of Human Xing Reconsidered. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (2):147-163.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Li Ma (2000). A Comparison of the Legitimacy of Power Between Confucianist and Legalist Philosophies. Asian Philosophy 10 (1):49-59.
    The concept of legitimacy is at the heart of the theory of power. It is essential to understand how a political power is built and how obedience is obtained among the population. We examine here the legitimacy of power for two of the most important political philosophies of classical China: Confucianism and Legalism. We show how a specific group of the population, the scholar-officials, play a specialised role in the two systems, acting as a legitimisation group. We further compare rites (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Lin Ma (2008). Beyond the Urge of Defense. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):141-144.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Edward J. Machle (1980). Leibniz and Confucianism: The Search for Accord. Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (4).
1 — 50 / 1072