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  1. Dennis Patrick O'Hara Alan Abelsohn (2011). Ethical Response to Climate Change. Ethics and the Environment 16 (1):25-50.
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  2. Jonathan H. Adler (2009). Taking Property Rights Seriously: The Case of Climate Change. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):296-316.
    The dominant approach to environmental policy endorsed by conservative and libertarian policy thinkers, so-called (FME), is grounded in the recognition and protection of property rights in environmental resources. Despite this normative commitment to property rights, most self-described FME advocates adopt a utilitarian, welfare-maximization approach to climate change policy, arguing that the costs of mitigation measures could outweigh the costs of climate change itself. Yet even if anthropogenic climate change is decidedly less than catastrophic, human-induced climate change is likely to contribute (...)
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  3. Julia Agapitos (2010). Eileen Crist and H. Bruce Rinker, Eds. Gaia in Turmoil: Climate Change, Biodepletion and Earth Ethics in an Age of Crisis. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):286-288.
    Gaia in Turmoil is the latest collaborative work put forth by the interdisciplinary group of Gaian thinkers. The contributors set out to meaningfully grapple with the bewildering ecological and social crises that humanity faces in this young century. Their work clearly rests on the assumption that such crises not only exist, but are dire—a conviction that unifies the essays in Gaia in Turmoil. By demonstrating how Gaia theory can advance various research projects, Gaia in Turmoil is an alarmist plea to (...)
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  4. G. A. Albrecht, C. Brooke, D. H. Bennett & S. T. Garnett (2013). The Ethics of Assisted Colonization in the Age of Anthropogenic Climate Change. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (4):827-845.
    This paper examines an issue that is becoming increasingly relevant as the pressures of a warming planet, changing climate and changing ecosystems ramp up. The broad context for the paper is the intragenerational, intergenerational, and interspecies equity implications of changing the climate and the value orientations of adapting to such change. In addition, the need to stabilize the planetary climate by urgent mitigation of change factors is a foundational ethical assumption. In order to avoid further animal and plant extinctions, or (...)
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  5. Ben Almassi (2012). Climate Change and the Ethics of Individual Emissions. Perspectives International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 4:4-21.
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong argues, on the relationship between individual emissions and climate change, that “we cannot claim to know that it is morally wrong to drive a gas guzzler just for fun” or engage in other inessential emissions-producing individual activities. His concern is not uncertainty about the phenomenon of climate change, nor about human contribution to it. Rather, on Sinnott-Armstrong’s analysis the claim of individual moral responsibility for emissions must be grounded in a defensible moral principle, yet no principle withstands scrutiny. (...)
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  6. Raymond Anthony (2012). Taming the Unruly Side of Ethics: Overcoming Challenges of a Bottom-Up Approach to Ethics in the Areas of Food Policy and Climate Change. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):813-841.
    Here, I investigate the challenges involved in addressing ethical questions related to food policy, food security, and climate change in a public engagement atmosphere where “experts” (e.g., scientists and scholars), policy-makers and laypersons interact. My focus is on the intersection between food and climate in the state of Alaska, located in the circumpolar north. The intersection of food security and climate represents a “wicked problem.” This wicked problem is plagued by “unruliness,” characterized by disruptive mechanisms that can impede how ethical (...)
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  7. Denis G. Arnold (ed.) (2011). Ethics of Global Climate Change. Cambridge University Press.
    Global climate change is one of the most daunting ethical and political challenges confronting humanity in the twenty-first century. The intergenerational and transnational ethical issues raised by climate change have been the focus of a significant body of scholarship. In this new collection of essays, leading scholars engage and respond to first-generation scholarship and argue for new ways of thinking about our ethical obligations to present and future generations. Topics addressed in these essays include moral accountability for energy consumption and (...)
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  8. Denis G. Arnold & Keith Bustos (2005). Business, Ethics, and Global Climate Change. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 24 (1/2):103-130.
    After providing a brief history of global climate change, we consider and reject the influential position that free markets and responsive democracies relieve corporations of obligations to protect the environment. Five main objections to the free market view are presented, focusing in particular on the roles of business organizations in the transportation and electricity generation sectors. Ethically grounded management and public policy recommendations are offered.
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  9. Monica Aufrecht (2012). Rethinking “Greening of Hate”: Climate Emissions, Immigration, and the Last Frontier. Ethics and the Environment 17 (2):51-74.
    The sheer number of immigrants has simply overwhelmed our country’s ability to continue to provide for newcomers and natives alike, and in many cases has only added to America’s problems… Our population growth … is a root cause of many of the United States’ problems and presents a serious threat to our limited natural resources such as topsoil, forests, clean air and water, and healthy ecosystems. It’s not so much the number of people that matters, but how they live. Concerns (...)
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  10. Monica Aufrecht (2011). Climate Change and Structural Emissions. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):201-213.
    Given that mitigating climate change is a large-scale global issue, what obligations do individuals have to lower their personal carbon emissions? I survey recent suggestions by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Dale Jamieson and offer models for thinking about their respective approaches. I then present a third model based on the notion of structural violence. While the three models are not mutually incompatible, each one suggests a different focus for mitigating climate change. In the end, I agree with Sinnott-Armstrong that people have (...)
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  11. Paul Baer (2011). The Situation of the Most Vulnerable Countries After Copenhagen. Ethics, Policy and Environment 13 (2):223-228.
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  12. Paul Baer, Tom Athanasiou, Sivan Kartha & Eric Kemp-Benedict (2009). Greenhouse Development Rights: A Proposal for a Fair Global Climate Treaty. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (3):267-281.
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  13. Melany Banks (2013). Individual Responsibility for Climate Change. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):42-66.
    As we become more aware of the potential causes and consequences of climate change we are left wondering: who is responsible? Climate change has the potential to harm large portions of the global population and, arguably, is already doing so. Further, climate change is argued to be human-caused. If this is true, then it seems to be the case that we can analyze climate change in terms of responsibility. I argue that we can approach environmental harms, such as climate change, (...)
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  14. Michelle Bastian (2012). Fatally Confused: Telling the Time in the Midst of Ecological Crises. Journal of Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):23-48.
    Focusing particularly on the role of the clock in social life, this article explores the conventions we use to “tell the time.” I argue that although clock time generally appears to be an all-encompassing tool for social coordination, it is actually failing to coordinate us with some of the most pressing ecological changes currently taking place. Utilizing philosophical approaches to performativity to explore what might be going wrong, I then draw on Derrida’s and Haraway’s understandings of social change in order (...)
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  15. S. Baum (forthcoming). Beyond the Ramsey Model for Climate Change Assessments. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics.
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  16. Seth Baum, Jacob Haqq-Misra & Chris Karmosky (2012). Climate Change: Evidence of Human Causes and Arguments for Emissions Reduction. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):393-410.
    In a recent editorial, Raymond Spier expresses skepticism over claims that climate change is driven by human actions and that humanity should act to avoid climate change. This paper responds to this skepticism as part of a broader review of the science and ethics of climate change. While much remains uncertain about the climate, research indicates that observed temperature increases are human-driven. Although opinions vary regarding what should be done, prominent arguments against action are based on dubious factual and ethical (...)
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  17. Whitney Bauman (2011). Religion, Science, and Nature: Shifts in Meaning on a Changing Planet. Zygon 46 (4):777-792.
    Abstract This article explores how religion and science, as worlding practices, are changed by the processes of globalization and global climate change. In the face of these processes, two primary methods of meaning making are emerging: the logic of globalization and planetary assemblages. The former operates out of the same logic as extant axial age religions, the Enlightenment, and Modernity. It is caught up in the process of universalizing meanings, objective truth, and a single reality. The latter suggests that the (...)
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  18. Beth A. Bee (2014). Training Manual on Gender and Climate Change. By Lorena Aguilar. San José, Costa Rica: Global Gender and Climate Alliance (GGCA), 2009. [REVIEW] Hypatia 29 (3):702-706.
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  19. Derek Bell (2013). How Should We Think About Climate Justice? Environmental Ethics 35 (2):189-208.
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  20. Derek Bell (2011). Does Anthropogenic Climate Change Violate Human Rights? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):99-124.
    Early discussions of ?climate justice? have been dominated by economists rather than political philosophers. More recently, analytical liberal political philosophers have joined the debate. However, the philosophical discussion of climate justice remains in its early stages. This paper considers one promising approach based on human rights, which has been advocated recently by several theorists, including Simon Caney, Henry Shue and Tim Hayward. A basic argument supporting the claim that anthropogenic climate change violates human rights is presented. Four objections to this (...)
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  21. Derek Bell (2011). Global Climate Justice, Historic Emissions, and Excusable Ignorance. The Monist 94 (3):391-411.
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  22. Brian Berkey (2014). Climate Change, Moral Intuitions, and Moral Demandingness. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 4 (2):157-189.
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  23. Brian Berkey (2014). State Action, State Policy, and the Doing/Allowing Distinction. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (2):147-149.
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  24. Cristina Besio & Andrea Pronzini (2013). Morality, Ethics, and Values Outside and Inside Organizations: An Example of the Discourse on Climate Change. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (3):1-14.
    The public debate on climate change is filled with moral claims. However, scientific knowledge about the role that morality, ethics, and values play in this issue is still scarce. Starting from this research gap, we focus on corporations as central decision makers in modern society and analyze how they respond to societal demands to take responsibility for climate change. While relevant literature on business ethics and climate change either places a high premium on morality or presents a strong skeptical bias, (...)
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  25. Gregor Betz (2012). The Case for Climate Engineering Research: An Analysis of the “Arm the Future” Argument. Climatic Change 111 (2):473-485.
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  26. Gregor Betz (2012). Wie ist das 2-Grad-Ziel der internationalen Klimapolitik begründet? In Geert Keil (ed.), Unscharfe Grenzen im Umwelt- und Technikrecht. Nomos.
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  27. Gregor Betz & Sebastian Cacean (2012). Ethical Aspects of Climate Engineering. Karlsruhe. KIT Scientific Publishing.
    This study investigates the ethical aspects of deploying and researching into so-called climate engineering methods, i.e. large-scale technical interventions in the climate system with the objective of offsetting anthropogenic climate change. The moral reasons in favour of and against R&D into and deployment of CE methods are analysed by means of argument maps. These argument maps provide an overview of the CE controversy and help to structure the complex debate.
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  28. Sabine Bock, Gero Fedtke & Sascha Gabizon (2010). Climate Justice Through Energy and Gender Justice: Strengthening Gender Equality in Accessing Sustainable Energy in the Eecca Region. In Irene Dankelman (ed.), Gender and Climate Change: An Introduction. Earthscan. 240.
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  29. Paul Bou-Habib (2010). Climate Change, Justice and Future Generations. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (1):151-153.
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  30. Steve Bouma-Prediger (forthcoming). Book Review: Climate Justice: Ethics, Energy, and Public Policy. [REVIEW] Interpretation 65 (4):424-424.
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  31. Thom Brooks (2011). Respect for Nature: The Capabilities Approach. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):143 - 146.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 143-146, June 2011.
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  32. Thom Brooks, Climate Change and Negative Duties.
    It is widely accepted by the scientific community and beyond that human beings are primarily responsible for climate change and that climate change has brought with it a number of real problems. These problems include, but are not limited to, greater threats to coastal communities, greater risk of famine, and greater risk that tropical diseases may spread to new territory. In keeping with J. S. Mill's 'Harm Principle', green political theorists often respond that if we are contributing a harm to (...)
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  33. John Broome, Paper on the Ethics of Climate Change.
    commissioned for the Stern Review of the Economics of Climate Change.
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  34. John Broome, Valuing Policies in Response to Climate Change: Some Ethical Issues'.
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  35. John Broome (2012). Climate Matters. W. W. Norton.
    Esteemed philosopher John Broome avoids the familiar ideological stances on climate change policy and examines the issue through an invigorating new lens. As he considers the moral dimensions of climate change, he reasons clearly through what universal standards of goodness and justice require of us, both as citizens and as governments. His conclusions—some as demanding as they are logical—will challenge and enlighten. Eco-conscious readers may be surprised to hear they have a duty to offset all their carbon emissions, while policy (...)
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  36. Donald A. Brown (2013). Climate Change Ethics: Navigating the Perfect Moral Storm. Routledge.
    Part 1. Introduction -- Introduction: Navigating the Perfect Moral Storm in Light of a Thirty-Five Year Debate -- Thirty-Five Year Climate Change Policy Debate -- Part 2. Priority Ethical Issues -- Ethical Problems with Cost Arguments -- Ethics and Scientific Uncertainty Arguments -- Atmospheric Targets -- Allocating National Emissions Targets -- Climate Change Damages and Adaptation Costs -- Obligations of Sub-national Governments, Organizations, Businesses, and Individuals -- Independent Responsibility to Act -- Part 3. The Crucial Role of Ethics in Climate (...)
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  37. Donald A. Brown (2012). Achieving Traction for Ethical Principles in Climate Change Negotiation Outcomes After Durban. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (3):314 - 320.
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  38. Donald A. Brown (2009). The Importance of Creating an Applied Environmental Ethics: Lessons Learned From Climate Change. In Ben A. Minteer (ed.), Nature in Common?: Environmental Ethics and the Contested Foundations of Environmental Policy. Temple University Press.
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  39. Matthew J. Brown (2013). Science, Values, and Democracy in the Global Climate Change Debate. In Shane Ralston (ed.), Philosophical Pragmatism and International Relations: Essays for a Bold New World. Lexington. 127-158.
    This chapter will develop and apply ideas drawn from and inspired by Dewey’s work on science and democracy to the context of international relations (IR). I will begin with Dewey’s views on the nature of democracy, which lead us into his philosophy of science. I will show that scientific and policy inquiry are inextricably related processes, and that they both have special requirements in a democratic context. There are some challenges applying these ideas to the IR case, but these challenges (...)
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  40. Matthew J. Brown & Joyce C. Havstad, The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Feminist Pragmatist Perspective.
    We offer a critical analysis of the science and politics of global climate change from a feminist pragmatist perspective, with special attention to the interactions between science and policy. We find the current state of play in all three areas (science, policy, and the space of interaction between them) to be lacking. We attribute mutual responsibility for the current impasse in addressing the climate crisis. What is called for is an alternative framework for thinking about science and policy interactions, which (...)
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  41. Holly Jean Buck, Andrea R. Gammon & Christopher J. Preston (2014). Gender and Geoengineering. Hypatia 29 (3):651-669.
    Geoengineering has been broadly and helpfully defined as “the intentional manipulation of the earth's climate to counteract anthropogenic climate change or its warming effects” (Corner and Pidgeon , 26). Although there exists a rapidly growing literature on the ethics of geoengineering, very little has been written about its gender dimensions. The authors consider four contexts in which geoengineering appears to have important gender dimensions: (1) the demographics of those pushing the current agenda, (2) the overall vision of control it involves, (...)
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  42. Keith Bustos (2005). Business, Ethics, and Global Climate Change. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 24 (1/2):103-130.
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  43. Craig G. Buttke (2006). The Death of Our Planet's Species. Environmental Philosophy 3 (1):82-83.
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  44. Sujatha Byravan & Sudhir Chella Rajan (2010). The Ethical Implications of Sea-Level Rise Due to Climate Change. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (3):239-260.
    Does humanity have a moral obligation toward the estimated millions of individuals who will be displaced from their homes over the course of this century primarily due to sea-level rise as the Earth’s climate warms? If there are indeed sound reasons for the world to act on their behalf, what form should these actions take? -/- This paper argues that migration and permanent resettlement would be the only possible “adaptation” strategy available to millions. While existing international law provides no solution (...)
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  45. W. Malcolm Byrnes (2007). Global Climate Change and Catholic Responsibility. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 4 (2):373-401.
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  46. Gideon Calder (2011). Climate Change and Normativity: Constructivism Versus Realism. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):153-169.
    Is liberalism adaptable enough to the ecological agenda to deal satisfactorily with the challenges of anthropogenic climate change while leaving its normative foundations intact? Compatibilists answer yes; incompatibilists say no. Comparing such answers, this article argues that it is not discrete liberal principles which impede adapatability, so much as the constructivist model (exemplified in Rawls) of what counts as a valid normative principle. Constructivism has both normative and ontological variants, each with a realist counterpart. I argue that normative constructivism in (...)
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  47. Gideon Calder & Catriona McKinnon (2011). Introduction: Climate Change and Liberal Priorities. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):91-97.
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  48. Simon Caney (2014). Two Kinds of Climate Justice: Avoiding Harm and Sharing Burdens. Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (4):125-149.
  49. Simon Caney (2014). Climate Change, Intergenerational Equity and the Social Discount Rate. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (4):320-342.
    Climate change is projected to have very severe impacts on future generations. Given this, any adequate response to it has to consider the nature of our obligations to future generations. This paper seeks to do that and to relate this to the way that inter-generational justice is often framed by economic analyses of climate change. To do this the paper considers three kinds of considerations that, it has been argued, should guide the kinds of actions that one generation should take (...)
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  50. Simon Caney (2012). Just Emissions. Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (4):255-300.
    This paper examines what would be a fair distribution of the right to emit greenhouse gases. It distinguishes between views that treat the distribution of this right on its own (Isolationist Views) and those that treat it in conjunction with the distribution of other goods (Integrationist Views). The most widely held view treats adopts an Isolationist approach and holds that emission rights should be distributed equally. This paper provides a critique of this 'equal per capita' view, and the isolationist assumptions (...)
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