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Cloning

Edited by Ruchika Mishra (Program in Medicine and Human Values, California Pacific Medical Center)
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  1. Be Acceptable (2013). Were It Physically Safe, Human Reproductive Cloning Would. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons. 25--79.
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  2. Nicholas Agar (2003). Cloning and Identity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):9 – 26.
    Critics of human cloning allege that the results of the process are likely to suffer from compromised identities making it near impossible for them to live worthwhile lives. This paper uses the account of the metaphysics of personal identity offered by Derek Parfit to investigate and support the claim of identity-compromise. The cloned person may, under certain circumstances, be seen as surviving, to some degree, in the clone. However, I argue that rather than warranting concern, the potential for survival by (...)
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  3. Jaime Ahlberg & Harry Brighouse (2011). An Argument Against Cloning. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):539-566.
    It is technically possible to clone a human being. The result of the procedure would be a human being in its own right. Given the current level of cloning technology concerning other animals there is every reason to believe that early human clones will have shorter-than-average life-spans, and will be unusually prone to disease. In addition, they would be unusually at risk of genetic defects, though they would still, probably, have lives worth living. But with experimentation and experience, seriously unequal (...)
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  4. Dale Ahlquist (2004). Cloning and Other Evils. The Chesterton Review 30 (1/2):138-140.
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  5. Fatima Agha Al-Hayani (2008). Muslim Perspectives on Stem Cell Research and Cloning. Zygon 43 (4):783-795.
    In Islam, the acquisition of knowledge is a form of worship. But human achievement must be exercised in conformity with God's will. Warnings against feelings of superiority often are coupled with the command to remain within the confines of God's laws and limits. Because of the fear of arrogance and disregard of the balance created by God, any new knowledge or discovery must be applied with careful consideration to maintaining balance in the creation. Knowledge must be applied to ascertain equity (...)
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  6. Stuart Allan, Alison Anderson & Alan Petersen (2005). Reporting Risk: Science Journalism and the Prospect of Human Cloning. In Sean Watson & Anthony Moran (eds.), Trust, Risk, and Uncertainty. Palgrave Macmillan. 165--180.
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  7. Fritz Allhoff (2004). Telomeres and the Ethics of Human Cloning. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):29 – 31.
    In search of a potential problem with cloning, I investigate the phenomenon of telomere shortening which is caused by cell replication; clones created from somatic cells will have shortened telomeres and therefore reach a state of senescence more rapidly. While genetic intervention might fix this problem at some point in the future, I ask whether, absent technological advances, this biological phenomenon undermines the moral permissibility of cloning.
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  8. Robert F. Almeder & James M. Humber (1998). Human Cloning. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  9. Judith Andre (2002). Respecting Diversity, Respecting Complexity. Law Review of Michigan State University-Detroit College of Law 2002 (4):911-916.
    A discussion of the ethics of stem cell research, and attempts to regulate it.
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  10. Emmanuel Ifeanyi Ani (2013). Questioning Cloning with Genealogy. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):376-379.
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  11. Rachel Allyson Ankeny (2001). Cloning Around (Survey Review of Books on Cloning). Metascience 10 (3):401-405.
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  12. Jonny Anomaly (2014). Public Goods and Procreation. Monash Bioethics Review 32:172-188.
    Procreation is the ultimate public goods problem. Each new child affects the welfare of many other people, and some (but not all) children produce uncompensated value that future people will enjoy. This essay addresses challenges that arise if we think of procreation and parenting as public goods. These include whether private choices are likely to lead to a socially desirable outcome over the long run, and whether changes in laws, social norms, or access to genetic engineering and embryo selection might (...)
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  13. Carlos Lema Añón (2003). Some Problems of Legal Regulation on Human Cloning. Global Bioethics 16 (1):41-53.
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  14. Kiarash Aramesh & Soroush Dabbagh (2007). An Islamic View to Stem Cell Research and Cloning: Iran's Experience. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):62-63.
  15. Robert John Araujo (2007). The UN Declaration on Human Cloning: A Survey and Assessment of the Debate. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (1):129-150.
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  16. Rev Benedict Ashley & Rev Albert Moraczewski (2001). Cloning, Aquinas, and the Embryonic Person. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (2):189-201.
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  17. Elvio Baccarini (2005). The Liberal View on Some Common Issues in the Moral Debate About Cloning. Synthesis Philosophica 20 (2):443-459.
    It is from the mere announcement of the possibility of human cloning that moralists have formulated critical arguments against the permissibility of introducing this practice. A critical survey of these arguments, however, shows that they are not well founded, i.e. that frequently they are not such that they can be used as legitimate arguments in the debate about what is publicly permissible in a state, that they rely on mistaken premises, or that they are non coherent with permissions in relation (...)
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  18. Harold W. Baillie, William A. Galston, Sara Goering, Deborah Hellman, Mark Sagoff, Paul B. Thompson, Robert Wachbroit, David T. Wasserman & Richard M. Zaner (2003). Genetic Prospects: Essays on Biotechnology, Ethics, and Public Policy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The essays in this volume apply philosophical analysis to address three kinds of questions: What are the implications of genetic science for our understanding of nature? What might it influence in our conception of human nature? What challenges does genetic science pose for specific issues of private conduct or public policy?
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  19. William Sims Bainbridge (2003). Religious Opposition to Cloning. Journal of Evolution and Technology 13.
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  20. Beth Baker (1997). Washington Watch To Clone or Not to Clone—Congress Poses the Question. BioScience 47 (6):340-340.
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  21. Rebecca Bamford (2011). Reconsidering Risk to Women: Oocyte Donation for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (9):37-39.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 9, Page 37-39, September 2011.
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  22. Y. Michael Barilan (2003). One or Two: An Examination of the Recent Case of the Conjoined Twins From Malta. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):27 – 44.
    The article questions the assumption that conjoined twins are necessarily two people or persons by employing arguments based on different points of view: non-personal vitalism, the person as a sentient being, the person as an agent, the person as a locus of narrative and valuation, and the person as an embodied mind. Analogies employed from the cases of amputation, multiple personality disorder, abortion, split-brain patients and cloning. The article further questions the assumption that a conjoined twin's natural interest and wish (...)
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  23. Jyotish C. Basak (2002). Cloning: Social or Scientific Priority? Indian Philosophical Quarterly 29 (4):517-528.
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  24. Françoise Baylis (2002). Human Cloning: Three Mistakes and an Alternative. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (3):319 – 337.
    The current debate on the ethics of cloning humans is both uninspired and uninspiring. In large measure this is because of mistakes that permeate the discourse, including the mistake of thinking that cloning technology is strictly a reproductive technology when it is used to create whole beings. As a result, the challenge this technology represents regarding our understanding of ourselves and the species to which we belong typically is inappropriately downplayed or exaggerated. This has meant that important (albeit disquieting) societal (...)
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  25. Netanel Berko (2009). Jewish Bioethical Perspectives on the Therapeutic Use of Stem Cells and Cloning. In Jonathan Wiesen (ed.), And You Shall Surely Heal: The Albert Einstein College of Medicine Synagogue Compendium of Torah and Medicine. Ktav Pub. House. 153.
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  26. L. Bernier (2004). Reproductive and Therapeutic Cloning, Germline Therapy, and Purchase of Gametes and Embryos: Comments on Canadian Legislation Governing Reproduction Technologies. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):527-532.
    In Canada, the Assisted Human Reproduction Act received royal assent on 29 March 2004. The approach proposed by the federal government responds to Canadians’ strong desire for an enforceable legislative framework in the field of reproduction technologies through criminal law. As a result of the widening gap between the rapid pace of technological change and governing legislation, a distinct need was perceived to create a regulatory framework to guide decisions regarding reproductive technologies.In this article the three main topics covered in (...)
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  27. Gordijn Bert (1999). Cloning of Human Beings. An Old Debate-Still in its Infancy. Ethik in der Medizin 11 (1).
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  28. Steven Best (2006). Genetic Science, Animal Exploitation, and the Challenge for Democracy. AI and Society 20 (1):6-21.
    As the debates over cloning and stem cell research indicate, issues raised by biotechnology combine research into the genetic sciences, perspectives and contexts articulated by the social sciences, and the ethical and anthropological concerns of philosophy. Consequently, I argue that intervening in the debates over biotechnology requires supra-disciplinary critical philosophy and social theory to illuminate the problems and their stakes. In addition, debates over cloning and stem cell research raise exceptionally important challenges to bioethics and a democratic politics of communication.
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  29. Steven Best & Douglas Kellner, Biotechnology, Ethics, and the Politics of Cloning.
    As we move into a new millennium fraught with terror and danger, a global postmodern cosmopolis is unfolding in the midst of rapid evolutionary and social changes co-constructed by science, technology, and the restructuring of global capital. We are quickly morphing into a new biological and social existence that is ever-more mediated and shaped by computers, mass media, and biotechnology, all driven by the logic of capital and a powerful emergent technoscience. In this global context, science is no longer merely (...)
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  30. N. Biller-Andorno (2005). It's Cloning Again! Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):63-63.
    Further discussion of the ongoing human cloning debate.In the late 1990s cloning was still the subject of passionate debate. While philosophers were crossing swords about the implications of the “Dolly technique” for the meaning of human identity, sweeping declarations were made by major international bodies such as the World Medical Association, UNESCO, and the World Health Organization that unanimously condemned human reproductive cloning as ethically unacceptable and/or contrary to human dignity. By now, the topic elicits a mere frown, sneer, sigh, (...)
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  31. Nikola Biller-Andorno (forthcoming). Editorial: It's Cloning Again! Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  32. Laura Jane Bishop & Susan Cartier Poland (2002). Bioethics and Cloning, Part II. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (4):391-407.
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  33. Russell Blackford (2007). Slippery Slopes to Slippery Slopes: Therapeutic Cloning and the Criminal Law. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):63-64.
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  34. Russell Blackford (2005). Human Cloning And'posthuman'society. Monash Bioethics Review 24 (1):10-26.
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  35. Michael Blome-Tillman, Reproductive Cloning, Genetic Engineering and the Autonomy of the Child: The Moral Agent and the Open Future.
  36. Andrea Bonnicksen (2009). Therapeutic Cloning: Politics and Policy. In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oup Oxford.
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  37. Andrea Bonnicksen (2007). Pt. V. Reproduction and Cloning. Abortion Revisited / Don Marquis ; Moral Status, Moral Value, and Human Embryos: Implications for Stem Cell Research / Bonnie Steinbock ; Therapeutic Cloning: Politics and Policy. [REVIEW] In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
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  38. Andrea L. Bonnicksen (1997). Procreation by Cloning: Crafting Anticipatory Guidelines. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):273-282.
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  39. Christina Brandt (2012). Hybrid Times: Theses on the Temporalities of Cloning. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):75-81.
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  40. Yitzchok Breitowitz (2002). What's So Bad About Human Cloning? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (4):325-341.
    : There appears to be a consensus in the general community that reproductive cloning is an immoral technology that should be banned. It may, however, be argued, at least from the perspective of the Jewish tradition, that reproductive cloning has many positive benefits. It is thus essential that one carefully weigh the costs and the benefits before deciding on a definitive course of action.
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  41. Jaime Ahlberg Harry Brighouse (2010). An Argument Against Cloning. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):539-566.
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  42. Alistair Brown (2010). Therapeutic Cloning: The Ethical Road to Regulation. Part I: Arguments For and Against & Regulations. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (2):75-86.
    In analysing the position adopted by the United Kingdom over therapeutic cloning, this paper will endeavour to examine the question of regulation, its necessity and extent. This will be achieved through considering different models of relevant theoretical discourse before, in applying that discourse to identified systems of regulation, the advantages and pitfalls of each system will be assessed in the hope of reaching a solution appropriate to the sensitive, yet dynamic, needs of the issue.
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  43. Alistair Brown (2010). Therapeutic Cloning: The Ethical Road to Regulation - Part II: Analysing the UK Position. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):60-73.
    It will be remembered that the introductory chapter to this paper differentiated between human therapeutic cloning and embryonic stem cell research, with the former concept encapsulating the latter one. In turning to examine the current system of regulation found within the United Kingdom this has particular relevance as it is only the practice of therapeutic cloning – the creation and use of an embryo – which engages with the regulative measures adopted.
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  44. Donald Bruce (2001). Human Embryonic Cloning. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 7 (1):3.
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  45. Donald M. Bruce (1997). Polly, Dolly, Megan and Morag. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 3 (2):82-91.
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  46. J. Burley & J. Harris (1999). Human Cloning and Child Welfare. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):108-113.
    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones (...)
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  47. Daniel Callahan (1998). Cloning: Then and Now. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):141-144.
    The possibility of human cloning first surfaced in the 1960s, stimulated by the report that a salamander had been cloned. James D. Watson and Joshua Lederberg, distinguished Nobel laureates, speculated that the cloning of human beings might one day be within reach; it was only a matter of time. Bioethics was still at that point in its infancybioethicsand cloning immediately caught the eye of a number of those beginning to write in the field. They included Paul Ramsey, Hans Jonas, and (...)
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  48. Nigel M. S. Cameroden (2006). On One Path or the Other" : Cloning, Religion and the Making of U.S. Biopolicy. In David E. Guinn (ed.), Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press.
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  49. S. Camporesi & L. Bortolotti (2008). Reproductive Cloning in Humans and Therapeutic Cloning in Primates: Is the Ethical Debate Catching Up with the Recent Scientific Advances? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e15-e15.
    After years of failure, in November 2007 primate embryonic stem cells were derived by somatic cellular nuclear transfer, also known as therapeutic cloning. The first embryo transfer for human reproductive cloning purposes was also attempted in 2006, albeit with negative results. These two events force us to think carefully about the possibility of human cloning which is now much closer to becoming a reality. In this paper we tackle this issue from two sides, first summarising what scientists have achieved so (...)
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  50. Arthur Caplan (2008). No More Cloning Around. Free Inquiry 28:20-20.
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