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  1. added 2015-01-30
    Sailee Shikhare, Stefan Heim, Elise Klein, Stefan Huber & Klaus Willmes (2015). Processing of Numerical and Proportional Quantifiers. Cognitive Science 39 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Quantifier expressions like “many” and “at least” are part of a rich repository of words in language representing magnitude information. The role of numerical processing in comprehending quantifiers was studied in a semantic truth value judgment task, asking adults to quickly verify sentences about visual displays using numerical or proportional quantifiers. The visual displays were composed of systematically varied proportions of yellow and blue circles. The results demonstrated that numerical estimation and numerical reference information are fundamental in encoding the meaning (...)
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  2. added 2015-01-25
    Wayne D. Gray (2014). Introduction to Volume 6, Issue 4 oftopiCS. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):559-559.
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  3. added 2015-01-23
    Wim T. J. L. Pouw, Jacqueline de Nooijer, Tamara Van Gog, Rolf A. Zwaan & Fred Paas (2014). Toward a More Embedded/Extended Perspective on the Cognitive Function of Gestures. Frontiers in Psychology 5 (359):1-14.
    Gestures are often considered to be demonstrative of the embodied nature of the mind(Hostetter and Alibali, 2008). In this article, we review current theories and researchtargeted at the intra-cognitive role of gestures. We ask the question how can gesturessupport internal cognitive processes of the gesturer? We suggest that extant theoriesare in a sense disembodied , because they focus solely on embodiment in terms ofthe sensorimotor neural precursors of gestures. As a result, current theories on theintra-cognitiveroleofgesturesarelackinginexplanatoryscopetoaddresshowgestures-as-bodily-acts fulfill a cognitive function. On (...)
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  4. added 2015-01-23
    Muhammad Ali Khalidi & Joshua Mugg (2014). The Inherent Bias in Positing an Inherence Heuristic. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (05):493-494.
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  5. added 2015-01-22
    Anna L. Theakston, Paul Ibbotson, Daniel Freudenthal, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2015). Productivity of Noun Slots in Verb Frames. Cognitive Science 39 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Productivity is a central concept in the study of language and language acquisition. As a test case for exploring the notion of productivity, we focus on the noun slots of verb frames, such as __want__, __see__, and __get__. We develop a novel combination of measures designed to assess both the flexibility and creativity of use in these slots. We do so using a rigorously controlled sample of child speech and child directed speech from three English-speaking children between the ages of (...)
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  6. added 2015-01-21
    Anja Jamrozik & Dedre Gentner (2015). Well‐Hidden Regularities: Abstract Uses of in and on Retain an Aspect of Their Spatial Meaning. Cognitive Science 39 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Prepositions name spatial relationships . But they are also used to convey abstract, non-spatial relationships —raising the question of how the abstract uses relate to the concrete spatial uses. Despite considerable success in delineating these relationships, no general account exists for the two most frequently extended prepositions: in and on. We test the proposal that what is preserved in abstract uses of these prepositions is the relative degree of control between the located object and the reference object . Across four (...)
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  7. added 2015-01-21
    Jeanette Kennett (2013). Pleasure and Addiction. Frontiers in Psychiatry 4.
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  8. added 2015-01-20
    Fadwa Cazala, Nicolas Vienney & Serge Stoleru (2015). The Cortical Sensory Representation of the Genitalia in Women and Men. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 4.
    Background. Although genital sensations are an essential aspect of sexual behavior, the cortical somatosensory representation of genitalia in women and men remain poorly known and contradictory results have been reported. Objective. To conduct a systematic review of studies based on electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging studies, with the aim to identify insights brought by modern methods since the early descriptions of the sensory homunculus in the primary somatosensory cortex . Results. The review supports the interpretation that there are two distinct representations (...)
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  9. added 2015-01-18
    Anil Gomes, Matthew Parrott & Joshua Shepherd (forthcoming). More Dead Than Dead? Attributing Mentality to Vegetative State Patients. Philosophical Psychology.
    In a recent paper, Gray, Knickman and Wegner (2011) present three experiments which they take to show that people perceive patients in a persistent vegetative state (PVS) to have less mentality than the dead. Following on from Gomes and Parrott (2014), we provide evidence to show that participants’ responses in the initial experiments are an artefact of the questions posed. Results from two experiments show that, once the questions have been clarified, people do not ascribe more mental capacity to the (...)
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  10. added 2015-01-15
    Francesca Foppolo, Marco Marelli, Luisa Meroni & Andrea Gualmini (2015). Hey Little Sister, Who's the Only One? Modulating Informativeness in the Resolution of Privative Ambiguity. Cognitive Science 39 (1).
    We present two eye-tracking experiments on the interpretation of sentences like “The tall girl is the only one that …,” which are ambiguous between the anaphoric and the exophoric interpretation . These interpretations differ in informativeness: in a positive context, the exophoric reading entails the anaphoric , while in a negative context the entailment pattern is reversed and the anaphoric reading is the strongest one. We tested whether adults rely on considerations about informativeness in solving the ambiguity. The results show (...)
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  11. added 2015-01-13
    Patricia Amaral & Fabio Del Prete (2014). On Truth Persistence. A Comparison Between European Portuguese and Italian in Relation to Sempre. In Variation within and across Romance Languages. Selected papers from the 41st Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages.
    This paper analyzes a non-temporal interpretation of the adverb sempre “always” in European Portuguese and Italian, in which the adverb expresses persistence of the truth of a proposition over time and displays specific contextual constraints (TP-sempre). Despite an overlap in the contexts in which TP-sempre may occur in both languages, we provide data showing that its distribution is not exactly the same in European Portuguese and Italian. In view of these data, we propose that TP-sempre is a modal operator of (...)
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  12. added 2015-01-10
    John B. Haviland (2015). Hey! Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):124-149.
    Zinacantec Family Homesign is a new sign language emerging spontaneously over the past three decades in a single family in a remote Mayan Indian village. Three deaf siblings, their Tzotzil-speaking age-mates, and now their children, who have had contact with no other deaf people, represent the first generation of Z signers. I postulate an augmented grammaticalization path, beginning with the adoption of a Tzotzil cospeech holophrastic gesture—meaning “come!”—into Z, and then its apparent stylization as an attention-getting sign, followed by grammatical (...)
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  13. added 2015-01-08
    Pamela Perniss, Asli Özyürek & Gary Morgan (2015). The Influence of the Visual Modality on Language Structure and Conventionalization: Insights From Sign Language and Gesture. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):2-11.
    For humans, the ability to communicate and use language is instantiated not only in the vocal modality but also in the visual modality. The main examples of this are sign languages and gestures. Sign languages, the natural languages of Deaf communities, use systematic and conventionalized movements of the hands, face, and body for linguistic expression. Co-speech gestures, though non-linguistic, are produced in tight semantic and temporal integration with speech and constitute an integral part of language together with speech. The articles (...)
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  14. added 2015-01-06
    David Temperley & Daniel Gildea (2015). Information Density and Syntactic Repetition. Cognitive Science 39 (1).
    In noun phrase coordinate constructions , there is a strong tendency for the syntactic structure of the second conjunct to match that of the first; the second conjunct in such constructions is therefore low in syntactic information. The theory of uniform information density predicts that low-information syntactic constructions will be counterbalanced by high information in other aspects of that part of the sentence, and high-information constructions will be counterbalanced by other low-information components. Three predictions follow: lexical probabilities will be lower (...)
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  15. added 2015-01-04
    Samuel G. B. Johnson & Woo‐Kyoung Ahn (2015). Causal Networks or Causal Islands? The Representation of Mechanisms and the Transitivity of Causal Judgment. Cognitive Science 39 (1).
    Knowledge of mechanisms is critical for causal reasoning. We contrasted two possible organizations of causal knowledge—an interconnected causal network, where events are causally connected without any boundaries delineating discrete mechanisms; or a set of disparate mechanisms—causal islands—such that events in different mechanisms are not thought to be related even when they belong to the same causal chain. To distinguish these possibilities, we tested whether people make transitive judgments about causal chains by inferring, given A causes B and B causes C, (...)
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  16. added 2015-01-01
    Pawel J. Matusz, Hannah Broadbent, Jessica Ferrari, Benjamin Forrest, Rebecca Merkley & Gaia Scerif (2015). Multi-Modal Distraction: Insights From Children’s Limited Attention. Cognition 136:156-165.
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  17. added 2015-01-01
    Peter Juslin, Marcus Lindskog & Bastian Mayerhofer (2015). Is There Something Special with Probabilities? – Insight Vs. Computational Ability in Multiple Risk Combination. Cognition 136:282-303.
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  18. added 2015-01-01
    Franklin Chang, Youngon Choi & Yeonjung Ko (2015). Why Loose Rings Can Be Tight: The Role of Learned Object Knowledge in the Development of Korean Spatial Fit Terms. Cognition 136:196-203.
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  19. added 2015-01-01
    Vera Kempe, Nicolas Gauvrit & Douglas Forsyth (2015). Structure Emerges Faster During Cultural Transmission in Children Than in Adults. Cognition 136:247-254.
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  20. added 2015-01-01
    S. Goldin-Meadow, D. Brentari, M. Coppola, L. Horton & A. Senghas (2015). Watching Language Grow in the Manual Modality: Nominals, Predicates, and Handshapes. Cognition 136:381-395.
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  21. added 2015-01-01
    Matthew W. Lowder & Peter C. Gordon (2015). Natural Forces as Agents: Reconceptualizing the Animate–Inanimate Distinction. Cognition 136:85-90.
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  22. added 2015-01-01
    Carola Haering & Andrea Kiesel (2015). Was It Me When It Happened Too Early? Experience of Delayed Effects Shapes Sense of Agency. Cognition 136:38-42.
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  23. added 2015-01-01
    Korbinian Moeller, Samuel Shaki, Silke M. Göbel & Hans-Christoph Nuerk (2015). Language Influences Number Processing – A Quadrilingual Study. Cognition 136:150-155.
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  24. added 2015-01-01
    Lewis J. Baker & Daniel T. Levin (2015). The Role of Relational Triggers in Event Perception. Cognition 136:14-29.
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  25. added 2015-01-01
    Zhenguang G. Cai, Martin J. Pickering, Ruiming Wang & Holly P. Branigan (2015). It is There Whether You Hear It or Not: Syntactic Representation of Missing Arguments. Cognition 136:255-267.
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  26. added 2015-01-01
    Michael L. Slepian (2015). Disentangling Multimodal Processes in Social Categorization. Cognition 136:396-402.
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  27. added 2015-01-01
    Roman Feiman, Susan Carey & Fiery Cushman (2015). Infants’ Representations of Others’ Goals: Representing Approach Over Avoidance. Cognition 136:204-214.
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  28. added 2015-01-01
    Ben Kenward, Kahl Hellmer, Lina Söderström Winter & Malin Eriksson (2015). Four-Year-Olds’ Strategic Allocation of Resources: Attempts to Elicit Reciprocation Correlate Negatively with Spontaneous Helping. Cognition 136:1-8.
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  29. added 2015-01-01
    Kaitlyn Bankieris & Julia Simner (2015). What is the Link Between Synaesthesia and Sound Symbolism? Cognition 136:186-195.
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  30. added 2015-01-01
    Zhenguang G. Cai & Louise Connell (2015). Space–Time Interdependence: Evidence Against Asymmetric Mapping Between Time and Space. Cognition 136:268-281.
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  31. added 2015-01-01
    Alek Chakroff & Liane Young (2015). Harmful Situations, Impure People: An Attribution Asymmetry Across Moral Domains. Cognition 136:30-37.
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  32. added 2015-01-01
    Hagai Golan & Eyal Ert (2015). Pricing Decisions From Experience: The Roles of Information-Acquisition and Response Modes. Cognition 136:9-13.
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  33. added 2015-01-01
    Thomas L. Griffiths (2015). Revealing Ontological Commitments by Magic. Cognition 136:43-48.
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  34. added 2015-01-01
    Edward A. Wasserman, Daniel I. Brooks & Bob McMurray (2015). Pigeons Acquire Multiple Categories in Parallel Via Associative Learning: A Parallel to Human Word Learning? Cognition 136:99-122.
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  35. added 2015-01-01
    Trevor Brothers, Tamara Y. Swaab & Matthew J. Traxler (2015). Effects of Prediction and Contextual Support on Lexical Processing: Prediction Takes Precedence. Cognition 136:135-149.
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  36. added 2015-01-01
    Cornelia Schulze & Michael Tomasello (2015). 18-Month-Olds Comprehend Indirect Communicative Acts. Cognition 136:91-98.
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  37. added 2015-01-01
    Matthias J. Sjerps & Antje S. Meyer (2015). Variation in Dual-Task Performance Reveals Late Initiation of Speech Planning in Turn-Taking. Cognition 136:304-324.
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  38. added 2015-01-01
    Daniel Lassiter & Noah D. Goodman (2015). How Many Kinds of Reasoning? Inference, Probability, and Natural Language Semantics. Cognition 136:123-134.
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  39. added 2015-01-01
    G. Brian Thompson, Claire M. Fletcher-Flinn, Kathryn J. Wilson, Michael F. McKay & Valerie G. Margrain (2015). Learning with Sublexical Information From Emerging Reading Vocabularies in Exceptionally Early and Normal Reading Development. Cognition 136:166-185.
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  40. added 2015-01-01
    Ullrich K. H. Ecker, Gordon D. A. Brown & Stephan Lewandowsky (2014). Memory Without Consolidation: Temporal Distinctiveness Explains Retroactive Interference. Cognitive Science 39 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Is consolidation needed to account for retroactive interference in free recall? Interfering mental activity during the retention interval of a memory task impairs performance, in particular if the interference occurs in temporal proximity to the encoding of the to-be-remembered information. There are at least two rival theoretical accounts of this temporal gradient of retroactive interference. The cognitive neuroscience literature has suggested neural consolidation is a pivotal factor determining item recall. According to this account, interfering activity interrupts consolidation processes that would (...)
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  41. added 2014-12-27
    Wayne D. Gray (forthcoming). Introduction to Volume 7, Issue 1 oftopiCS. Topics in Cognitive Science:n/a-n/a.
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  42. added 2014-12-27
    Wayne D. Gray (2015). Introduction to Volume 7, Issue 1 of topiCS. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):1-1.
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  43. added 2014-12-27
    Dinah Baer‐Henney, Frank Kügler & Ruben Vijver (2014). The Interaction of Language‐Specific and Universal Factors During the Acquisition of Morphophonemic Alternations With Exceptions. Cognitive Science 39 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Using the artificial language paradigm, we studied the acquisition of morphophonemic alternations with exceptions by 160 German adult learners. We tested the acquisition of two types of alternations in two regularity conditions while additionally varying length of training. In the first alternation, a vowel harmony, backness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix. This process is grounded in substance , and this universal phonetic factor bolsters learning a generalization. In the second alternation, tenseness of the stem vowel determines (...)
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  44. added 2014-12-23
    Pendaran Roberts & Kelly Schmidtke (forthcoming). Color Matching and Color Naming: A Reply to Kuehni and Hardin. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-6.
    We recently conducted an experiment to show that a lot of the empirically measured disagreement cited to support the premise that there is mass perceptual disagreement about the colors, a premise often cited by philosophers, is due to conceptual factors. Kuehni and Hardin object to how we measured disagreement and to various aspects of our experimental design. In this reply, we defend our study.
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  45. added 2014-12-23
    Diane Brentari, Alessio Di Renzo, Jonathan Keane & Virginia Volterra (2015). Cognitive, Cultural, and Linguistic Sources of a Handshape Distinction Expressing Agentivity. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):95-123.
    In this paper the cognitive, cultural, and linguistic bases for a pattern of conventionalization of two types of iconic handshapes are described. Work on sign languages has shown that handling handshapes and object handshapes express an agentive/non-agentive semantic distinction in many sign languages. H-HSs are used in agentive event descriptions and O-HSs are used in non-agentive event descriptions. In this work, American Sign Language and Italian Sign Language productions are compared as well as the corresponding groups of gesturers in each (...)
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  46. added 2014-12-23
    Brian J. Edwards, Russell C. Burnett & Frank C. Keil (2014). Effects of Causal Structure on Decisions About Where to Intervene on Causal Systems. Cognitive Science 39 (1):n/a-n/a.
    We investigated how people design interventions to affect the outcomes of causal systems. We propose that the abstract structural properties of a causal system, in addition to people's content and mechanism knowledge, influence decisions about how to intervene. In Experiment 1, participants preferred to intervene at specific locations in a causal chain regardless of which content variables occupied those positions. In Experiment 2, participants were more likely to intervene on root causes versus immediate causes when they were presented with a (...)
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  47. added 2014-12-23
    Titus Malsburg, Reinhold Kliegl & Shravan Vasishth (2014). Determinants of Scanpath Regularity in Reading. Cognitive Science 39 (1).
    Scanpaths have played an important role in classic research on reading behavior. Nevertheless, they have largely been neglected in later research perhaps due to a lack of suitable analytical tools. Recently, von der Malsburg and Vasishth proposed a new measure for quantifying differences between scanpaths and demonstrated that this measure can recover effects that were missed with the traditional eyetracking measures. However, the sentences used in that study were difficult to process and scanpath effects accordingly strong. The purpose of the (...)
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  48. added 2014-12-23
    Tom Foulsham & Maria Lock (2014). How the Eyes Tell Lies: Social Gaze During a Preference Task. Cognitive Science 39 (1).
    Social attention is thought to require detecting the eyes of others and following their gaze. To be effective, observers must also be able to infer the person's thoughts and feelings about what he or she is looking at, but this has only rarely been investigated in laboratory studies. In this study, participants' eye movements were recorded while they chose which of four patterns they preferred. New observers were subsequently able to reliably guess the preference response by watching a replay of (...)
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  49. added 2014-12-18
    Lamartine de Hollanda Cavalcanti Neto (2014). Eficácia do belo na educação segundo a Psicologia Tomista. Instituto Lumen Sapientiae.
    This book aims to examine the contributions that beauty (pulchrum in Latin) can offer to the educational activity, focusing on the subject from the point of view of Thomistic Psychology. For this, comes to answering some previous criterial and methodological objections to recall thereafter the main points of that psychological conception. The book presents what this conception understands as human powers, their interaction and dynamism, the role of emotions in the latter, and the processes arising from such interaction. In succession, (...)
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  50. added 2014-12-10
    Joshua Knobe (forthcoming). Philosophers Are Doing Something Different Now: Quantitative Data. Cognition.
    The philosophical study of mind in the twentieth century was dominated by a research program that used a priori methods to address foundational questions. Since that time, however, the philosophical study of mind has undergone a dramatic shift. To provide a more accurate picture of contemporary philosophical work, I compared a sample of highly cited philosophy papers from the past five years with a sample of highly cited philosophy papers from the twentieth century. In the twentieth century sample, the majority (...)
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