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  1. added 2016-09-24
    Victoria Klimaj & Adam Safron (forthcoming). Introductory Editorial to “Orgasm: Neurophysiological, Psychological, and Evolutionary Perspectives”. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
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  2. added 2016-09-24
    Victoria Klimaj & Adam Safron (2016). Introductory Editorial to “Orgasm: Neurophysiological, Psychological, and Evolutionary Perspectives”. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
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  3. added 2016-09-24
    Victoria Klimaj & Adam Safron (2016). Introductory Editorial to “Orgasm: Neurophysiological, Psychological, and Evolutionary Perspectives”. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
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  4. added 2016-09-24
    Victoria Klimaj & Adam Safron (2016). Introductory Editorial to “Orgasm: Neurophysiological, Psychological, and Evolutionary Perspectives”. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
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  5. added 2016-09-23
    Jordan S. Martin, Amy Summerville & Virginia B. Wickline (forthcoming). Persuasion and Pragmatics: An Empirical Test of the Guru Effect Model. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-16.
    Decades of research have investigated the complex role of source credibility in attitude persuasion. Current theories of persuasion predict that when messages are thoughtfully scrutinized, argument strength will tend to have a greater effect on attitudes than source credibility. Source credibility can affect highly elaborated attitudes, however, when individuals evaluate material that elicits low attitude extremity. A recently proposed model called the guru effect predicts that source credibility can also cause attitudinal change by biasing the interpretation of pragmatically ambiguous material. (...)
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  6. added 2016-09-23
    Pablo López-Silva (2016). Schizophrenia and the Place of Egodystonic States in the Aetiology of Thought Insertion. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (3):577-594.
    Despite the diagnostic relevance of thought insertion for disorders such as schizophrenia, the debates about its aetiology are far from resolved. This paper claims that in paying exclusive attention to the perceptual and cognitive impairments leading to delusional experiences in general, current deficit approaches overlook the role that affective disturbances might play in giving rise to cases of thought insertion. In the context of psychosis, affective impairments are often characterized as a consequence of the stress and anxiety caused by delusional (...)
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  7. added 2016-09-22
    Samy S. Abu Naser, Wadee W. Alamawi & Mostafa F. Alfarra (2016). Rule Based System for Diagnosing Wireless Connection Problems Using SL5 Object. International Journal of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering 5 (5).
    There is an increase in the use of in-door wireless networking solutions via Wi-Fi and this increase infiltrated and utilized Wi-Fi enable devices, as well as smart mobiles, games consoles, security systems, tablet PCs and smart TVs. Thus the demand on Wi-Fi connections increased rapidly. Rule Based System is an essential method in helping using the human expertise in many challenging fields. In this paper, a Rule Based System was designed and developed for diagnosing the wireless connection problems and attain (...)
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  8. added 2016-09-19
    Carla Krachun & Robert Lurz (2016). I Know You See It Wrong! Children Use Others’ False Perceptions to Predict Their Behaviors. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 150:380-395.
    Research on children’s ability to attribute false mental states to others has focused exclusively on false beliefs. We developed a novel paradigm that focuses instead on another type of false mental state: false perceptions. From approximately 4 years of age, children begin to recognize that their perception of an illusory object can be at odds with its true properties. Our question was whether they also recognize that another individual viewing the object will similarly experience a false perception. We tested 33 (...)
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  9. added 2016-09-18
    Luke Kersten (2016). Process Vs. Processor Accounts of Stage Models: A Cautionary Tale. Commentary: Seeing Changes: How Familiarity Alters Our Perception of Change. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    A commentary on: Seeing changes: How familiarity alters our perception of change.
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  10. added 2016-09-18
    Barbara Landau (2016). Update on “What” and “Where” in Spatial Language: A New Division of Labor for Spatial Terms. Cognitive Science 40 (6):n/a-n/a.
    In this article, I revisit Landau and Jackendoff's () paper, “What and where in spatial language and spatial cognition,” proposing a friendly amendment and reformulation. The original paper emphasized the distinct geometries that are engaged when objects are represented as members of object kinds, versus when they are represented as figure and ground in spatial expressions. We provided empirical and theoretical arguments for the link between these distinct representations in spatial language and their accompanying nonlinguistic neural representations, emphasizing the “what” (...)
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  11. added 2016-09-18
    Joseph M. Burling & Hanako Yoshida (2016). Highlighting in Early Childhood: Learning Biases Through Attentional Shifting. Cognitive Science 40 (6):n/a-n/a.
    The literature on human and animal learning suggests that individuals attend to and act on cues differently based on the order in which they were learned. Recent studies have proposed that one specific type of learning outcome, the highlighting effect, can serve as a framework for understanding a number of early cognitive milestones. However, little is known how this learning effect itself emerges among children, whose memory and attention are much more limited compared to adults. Two experiments were conducted using (...)
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  12. added 2016-09-18
    Guy Politzer (2005). Uncertainty and the Suppression of Inferences. Thinking and Reasoning 11:5-33.
    The explanation of the suppression of Modus Ponens inferences within the framework of linguistic pragmatics and of plausible reasoning is defended. First, this approach is expounded, and then it is shown that the results of the first experiment of Byrne, Espino and Santamaría support the uncertainty explanation but fail to support their counterexample explanation. Second, two experiments are presented. In the first one, aimed to refute one objection regarding the conclusions observed, the additional conditional premise was replaced with a statement (...)
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  13. added 2016-09-17
    Tuomas Eerola, Jonna K. Vuoskoski & Hannu Kautiainen (2016). Being Moved by Unfamiliar Sad Music Is Associated with High Empathy. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  14. added 2016-09-14
    Samy S. Abu Naser & Mohran H. Al-Bayed (2016). Detecting Health Problems Related to Addiction of Video Game Playing Using an Expert System. World Wide Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development 2 (9):7-12.
    Today’s everyone normal life can include a normal rate of playing computer games or video games; but what about an excessive or compulsive use of video games that impact on our life? Our kids, who usually spend a lot of time in playing video games will likely have a trouble in paying attention to their school lessons. In this paper, we introduce an expert system to help users in getting the correct diagnosis of the health problem of video game addictions (...)
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  15. added 2016-09-14
    Todd Davies (2016). Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark on Our Brains (Susan Greenfield). [REVIEW] New Media and Society 18 (9):2139-2141.
    This is a review of Susan Greenfield's 2015 book 'Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark On Our Brains'. Greenfield is a neuroscientist and a member of the UK House of Lords, who argues that digital technologies are changing the human environment "in an unprecedented way," and that by adapting to this environment, "the brain may also be changing in an unprecedented way." The book and its author have created a surprising amount of controversy. I discuss both Greenfield's (...)
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  16. added 2016-09-10
    Scott Barrton (1994). Chaos, Self-Organization, and Psychology. American Psychologist 49 (1):5–14.
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  17. added 2016-09-05
    Raymond Aaron Younis (2014). Neuroscience, Virtues, Ethics, Compassion and the Question of Character. In Michael A. Peters & Belsey Tina (eds.), Education and Philosophies of Engagement. PESA 80-92.
    There has been much debate recently about the meaning, place and function of “character” and “character traits” in Virtue Ethics. For example, a number of philosophers have argued recently that Virtue Ethics would be strengthened as a theory by the omission of talk of character traits; recent neuroscientific studies have suggested that there is scope for scepticism about the existence of such traits. I will argue that both approaches are flawed and unconvincing: in brief, the first approach tends to be (...)
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  18. added 2016-09-01
    Wendy L. Magee, Barbara Tillmann, Fabien Perrin & Caroline Schnakers (2016). Editorial: Music and Disorders of Consciousness: Emerging Research, Practice and Theory. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  19. added 2016-09-01
    Mary C. Broughton & Jane W. Davidson (2016). An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed Through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  20. added 2016-09-01
    Beth A. O'Brien & Sebastian Wallot (2016). Silent Reading Fluency and Comprehension in Bilingual Children. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  21. added 2016-09-01
    Ruiqi Xiao, Xianchun Li, Lin Li & Yanmei Wang (2016). Can We Distinguish Emotions From Faces? Investigation of Implicit and Explicit Processes of Peak Facial Expressions. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  22. added 2016-09-01
    Roman Kutlak, Kees van Deemter & Chris Mellish (2016). Production of Referring Expressions for an Unknown Audience: A Computational Model of Communal Common Ground. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  23. added 2016-08-30
    Daniel Brian Krupp, Lindsay A. Sewall, Martin L. Lalumière, Craig Sheriff & Grant T. Harris (2013). Psychopathy, Adaptation, and Disorder. Frontiers in Psychology 4:1-5.
    In a recent study, we found a negative association between psychopathy and violence against genetic relatives. We interpreted this result as a form of nepotism and argued that it failed to support the hypothesis that psychopathy is a mental disorder, suggesting instead that it supports the hypothesis that psychopathy is an evolved life history strategy. This interpretation and subsequent arguments have been challenged in a number of ways. Here, we identify several misunderstandings regarding the harmful dysfunction definition of mental disorder (...)
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  24. added 2016-08-30
    D. B. Krupp, L. A. Sewall, M. L. Lalumière, C. Sheriff & G. T. Harris (2012). Nepotistic Patterns of Violent Psychopathy: Evidence for Adaptation? Frontiers in Psychology 3:1-8.
    Psychopaths routinely disregard social norms by engaging in selfish, antisocial, often violent behavior. Commonly characterized as mentally disordered, recent evidence suggests that psychopaths are executing a well-functioning, if unscrupulous strategy that historically increased reproductive success at the expense of others. Natural selection ought to have favored strategies that spared close kin from harm, however, because actions affecting the fitness of genetic relatives contribute to an individual’s inclusive fitness. Conversely, there is evidence that mental disorders can disrupt psychological mechanisms designed to (...)
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  25. added 2016-08-28
    Seth Chin‐Parker & Julie Cantelon (2016). Contrastive Constraints Guide Explanation‐Based Category Learning. Cognitive Science 40 (6).
    This paper provides evidence for a contrastive account of explanation that is motivated by pragmatic theories that recognize the contribution that context makes to the interpretation of a prompt for explanation. This study replicates the primary findings of previous work in explanation-based category learning, extending that work by illustrating the critical role of the context in this type of learning. Participants interacted with items from two categories either by describing the items or explaining their category membership. We manipulated the feature (...)
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  26. added 2016-08-28
    Nicholas Duran, Rick Dale & Alexia Galati (2016). Toward Integrative Dynamic Models for Adaptive Perspective Taking. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (3).
    In a matter of mere milliseconds, conversational partners can transform their expectations about the world in a way that accords with another person's perspective. At the same time, in similar situations, the exact opposite also appears to be true. Rather than being at odds, these findings suggest that there are multiple contextual and processing constraints that may guide when and how people consider perspective. These constraints are shaped by a host of factors, including the availability of social and environmental cues, (...)
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  27. added 2016-08-28
    Juanma Fuente, Daniel Casasanto, Jose Isidro Martínez‐Cascales & Julio Santiago (2016). Motor Imagery Shapes Abstract Concepts. Cognitive Science 40 (6).
    The concepts of “good” and “bad” are associated with right and left space. Individuals tend to associate good things with the side of their dominant hand, where they experience greater motor fluency, and bad things with their nondominant side. This mapping has been shown to be flexible: Changing the relative fluency of the hands, or even observing a change in someone else's motor fluency, results in a reversal of the conceptual mapping, such that good things become associated with the side (...)
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  28. added 2016-08-27
    Niels Skovgaard-Olsen (forthcoming). Motivating a Relevance the Relevance Approach to Conditionals. Mind & Language.
    The aim is to theoretically motivate a relevance approach to (indicative) conditionals in a comparative discussion of the main alternatives. In particular, it will be argued that a relevance approach to conditionals is better motivated than the suppositional theory currently enjoying wide endorsement. In the course of this discussion, an argument will be presented of why failures of the epistemic relevance of the antecedent for the consequent should be counted as genuine semantic defects (as opposed to be relegated to pragmatics). (...)
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  29. added 2016-08-24
    Neil Van Leeuwen (forthcoming). Do Religious "Beliefs" Respond to Evidence? Philosophical Explorations.
    Some examples suggest that religious credences (or “beliefs”) respond to evidence. Other examples suggest they are wildly unresponsive. So the examples taken together suggest there is a puzzle about whether descriptive religious attitudes respond to evidence or not. I argue for a solution to this puzzle according to which religious credences are characteristically not responsive to evidence; that is, they do not tend to be extinguished by evidence contrary to them. And when they appear to be responsive, it is because (...)
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  30. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2015). Book Review Family Values by Harry Brighouse and Adam Swift. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (2):246.
    The authors definitely become the voice of countless parents. This book forces us to focus on the family, so neglected today, and emphasises its role in shaping values of future generations.
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  31. added 2016-08-24
    A. Kalis, S. Kaiser & A. Mojzisch (2013). Why We Should Talk About Option Generation in Decision-Making Research. Frontiers in Psychology 4 (555):1-8.
  32. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2011). Book Review How to Organize Life? A Vedanta Kesari Presentation. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 116 (6):466-7.
    This book is a compilation of various articles published in the special issue of the English journal 'The Vedanta Kesari' of December 2002. Many monks and other thinkers have put forth their ideas on various methods to organise our lives.
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  33. added 2016-08-23
    Samy S. Abu-Naser & Mones M. Al-Hanjori (2016). Knowledge Based Intelligent System for Men Genital Problems Diagnosis and Treatment. International Journal of Medicine Research 1.
    Male genital problems and injuries may occur quite simply because of the scrotum and penis are not protected like other organs. Genital problems and injuries normally happen through: recreational activities (like Football, Hooky, biking, basketball), work- related tasks (like contact to irritating chemicals), downhill drop, and sexual activity. A genital injury frequently causes harsh pain that typically disappear fast without causing enduring harm. Home handling is generally all that is required for trivial problems or injuries. Pain, inflammation, staining, or rashes (...)
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  34. added 2016-08-23
    Kirk W. Junker (2006). Ships Among Ports: Futures of Europe. Futures (38):129-132.
    The future is evitable. That is to say if, as many of the contributors to Futures over the years have claimed, there is more than one future possible, and that more than one will be experienced, then talking about ‘inevitability’ is simply wrong. And what a task it is to attempt to say anything warranted, but nevertheless fresh concerning the futures of Europe—especially in such a context as considering the plural conception of futures in the title of this publication! Immediately (...)
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  35. added 2016-08-23
    Kirk W. Junker (2004). Making Rights From What's Left of Darwinism. Futures (36):1111-1117.
    The legal, political, and social meaning of the work of Charles Darwin has been claimed as resident to conservative and liberal homes alike. Peter Singer’s unique admixture of personal liberal politics and what may look to be an extremely conservative philosophy of nature expose some over-simplicity in traditional ‘right’ and ‘left’ categories. In ‘‘Recovering the Left from Darwin in the 21st Century’’, Steve Fuller provides us with insightful historical and sociological contexts for Singer’s challenges. In this article, Kirk Junker takes (...)
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  36. added 2016-08-21
    Dominique Knutsen, Christine Ros & Ludovic Le Bigot (2016). Generating References in Naturalistic Face‐to‐Face and Phone‐Mediated Dialog Settings. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (3).
    During dialog, references are presented, accepted, and potentially reused. Two experiments were conducted to examine reuse in a naturalistic setting. In Experiment 1, where the participants interacted face to face, self-presented references and references accepted through verbatim repetition were reused more. Such biases persisted after the end of the interaction. In Experiment 2, where the participants interacted over the phone, reference reuse mainly depended on whether the participant could see the landmarks being referred to, although this bias seemed to be (...)
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  37. added 2016-08-19
    Jackson Tolins & Jean E. Fox Tree (2016). Overhearers Use Addressee Backchannels in Dialog Comprehension. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1412-1434.
    Observing others in conversation is a common format for comprehending language, yet little work has been done to understand dialog comprehension. We tested whether overhearers use addressee backchannels as predictive cues for how to integrate information across speaker turns during comprehension of spontaneously produced collaborative narration. In Experiment 1, words that followed specific backchannels were recognized more slowly than words that followed either generic backchannels or pauses. In Experiment 2, we found that when the turn after the backchannel was a (...)
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  38. added 2016-08-19
    Joshua A. Hemmerich, Kellie Van Voorhis & Jennifer Wiley (2016). Anomalous Evidence, Confidence Change, and Theory Change. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1534-1560.
    A novel experimental paradigm that measured theory change and confidence in participants' theories was used in three experiments to test the effects of anomalous evidence. Experiment 1 varied the amount of anomalous evidence to see if “dose size” made incremental changes in confidence toward theory change. Experiment 2 varied whether anomalous evidence was convergent or replicating. Experiment 3 varied whether participants were provided with an alternative theory that explained the anomalous evidence. All experiments showed that participants' confidence changes were commensurate (...)
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  39. added 2016-08-19
    Lea Frermann & Mirella Lapata (2016). Incremental Bayesian Category Learning From Natural Language. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1333-1381.
    Models of category learning have been extensively studied in cognitive science and primarily tested on perceptual abstractions or artificial stimuli. In this paper, we focus on categories acquired from natural language stimuli, that is, words. We present a Bayesian model that, unlike previous work, learns both categories and their features in a single process. We model category induction as two interrelated subproblems: the acquisition of features that discriminate among categories, and the grouping of concepts into categories based on those features. (...)
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  40. added 2016-08-19
    William S. Horton & Richard J. Gerrig (2016). Revisiting the Memory‐Based Processing Approach to Common Ground. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (3).
    Horton and Gerrig outlined a memory-based processing model of conversational common ground that provided a description of how speakers could both strategically and automatically gain access to information about others through domain-general memory processes acting over ordinary memory traces. In this article, we revisit this account, reviewing empirical findings that address aspects of this memory-based model. In doing so, we also take the opportunity to clarify what we believe this approach implies about the cognitive psychology of common ground, and just (...)
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  41. added 2016-08-19
    Ben Ambridge, Amy Bidgood, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland & Daniel Freudenthal (2016). Is Passive Syntax Semantically Constrained? Evidence From Adult Grammaticality Judgment and Comprehension Studies. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1435-1459.
    To explain the phenomenon that certain English verbs resist passivization, Pinker proposed a semantic constraint on the passive in the adult grammar: The greater the extent to which a verb denotes an action where a patient is affected or acted upon, the greater the extent to which it is compatible with the passive. However, a number of comprehension and production priming studies have cast doubt upon this claim, finding no difference between highly affecting agent-patient/theme-experiencer passives and non-actional experiencer theme passives. (...)
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  42. added 2016-08-19
    Adam J. L. Harris, Ulrike Hahn, Jens K. Madsen & Anne S. Hsu (2016). The Appeal to Expert Opinion: Quantitative Support for a Bayesian Network Approach. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1496-1533.
    The appeal to expert opinion is an argument form that uses the verdict of an expert to support a position or hypothesis. A previous scheme-based treatment of the argument form is formalized within a Bayesian network that is able to capture the critical aspects of the argument form, including the central considerations of the expert's expertise and trustworthiness. We propose this as an appropriate normative framework for the argument form, enabling the development and testing of quantitative predictions as to how (...)
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  43. added 2016-08-19
    Anna N. Rafferty, Emma Brunskill, Thomas L. Griffiths & Patrick Shafto (2016). Faster Teaching Via POMDP Planning. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1290-1332.
    Human and automated tutors attempt to choose pedagogical activities that will maximize student learning, informed by their estimates of the student's current knowledge. There has been substantial research on tracking and modeling student learning, but significantly less attention on how to plan teaching actions and how the assumed student model impacts the resulting plans. We frame the problem of optimally selecting teaching actions using a decision-theoretic approach and show how to formulate teaching as a partially observable Markov decision process planning (...)
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  44. added 2016-08-19
    Thomas M. Gruenenfelder, Gabriel Recchia, Tim Rubin & Michael N. Jones (2016). Graph‐Theoretic Properties of Networks Based on Word Association Norms: Implications for Models of Lexical Semantic Memory. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1460-1495.
    We compared the ability of three different contextual models of lexical semantic memory and of a simple associative model to predict the properties of semantic networks derived from word association norms. None of the semantic models were able to accurately predict all of the network properties. All three contextual models over-predicted clustering in the norms, whereas the associative model under-predicted clustering. Only a hybrid model that assumed that some of the responses were based on a contextual model and others on (...)
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  45. added 2016-08-19
    Yitzhaq Feder (2016). Contamination Appraisals, Pollution Beliefs, and the Role of Cultural Inheritance in Shaping Disease Avoidance Behavior. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1561-1585.
    Despite the upsurge of research on disgust, the implications of this research for the investigation of cultural pollution beliefs has yet to be adequately explored. In particular, the sensitivity of both disgust and pollution to a common set of elicitors suggests a common psychological basis, though several obstacles have prevented an integrative account, including methodological differences between the relevant disciplines. Employing a conciliatory framework that embraces both naturalistic and humanistic levels of explanation, this article examines the dynamic reciprocal process by (...)
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  46. added 2016-08-19
    Tal Linzen & T. Florian Jaeger (2016). Uncertainty and Expectation in Sentence Processing: Evidence From Subcategorization Distributions. Cognitive Science 40 (6):1382-1411.
    There is now considerable evidence that human sentence processing is expectation based: As people read a sentence, they use their statistical experience with their language to generate predictions about upcoming syntactic structure. This study examines how sentence processing is affected by readers' uncertainty about those expectations. In a self-paced reading study, we use lexical subcategorization distributions to factorially manipulate both the strength of expectations and the uncertainty about them. We compare two types of uncertainty: uncertainty about the verb's complement, reflecting (...)
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  47. added 2016-08-18
    Ingrid Masson‐Carro, Martijn Goudbeek & Emiel Krahmer (2016). Imposing Cognitive Constraints on Reference Production: The Interplay Between Speech and Gesture During Grounding. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (3).
    Past research has sought to elucidate how speakers and addressees establish common ground in conversation, yet few studies have focused on how visual cues such as co-speech gestures contribute to this process. Likewise, the effect of cognitive constraints on multimodal grounding remains to be established. This study addresses the relationship between the verbal and gestural modalities during grounding in referential communication. We report data from a collaborative task where repeated references were elicited, and a time constraint was imposed to increase (...)
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  48. added 2016-08-18
    Kirk W. Junker (2002). "Dediction". Futures (34):895-905.
    Of course it is not a word, this “dediction”; at least, not yet. But why not? As the story goes, James Joyce was once asked whether his habit of inventing words was because there were not enough words in the English language. He answered that there were enough words, just not the right words. To see whether “dediction” might be a “right word”, I begin by considering related terms, and then consider what they do for us—why do they exist and (...)
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  49. added 2016-08-17
    Theodore Bach (2015). Going Live: On the Value of a Newspaper-Centered Philosophy Seminar. American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 1:191-200.
    For the last several years I have made the daily newspaper the pedagogical center piece of my philosophy seminar. This essay begins by describing the variations, themes, and logistics of this approach. The essay then offers several arguments in support of the value of this approach. The first argument references measurable indicators of success. A second argument contends that by “going live” with philosophical concepts, the newspaper-centered approach is uniquely well-positioned to motivate and excite the philosophy student. A third argument (...)
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  50. added 2016-08-16
    Robert Henman (2016). Implementing Generalized Empirical Method in Neuroscience by Functionally Ordering Tasks. Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 9 (1):10-21.
    This article outlines a method of collaboration that will manifest a high probability of cumulative and progressive results in science. The method will accomplish this through a division of labour grounded in the order of occurrence of human cognitional operations. The following article explores the possibility of a method known as functional specialization, distinct tasks presently operative in neuroscience. Functional specialization will enhance collaboration within a science as well as initiate implementation of generalized empirical method. Implementation of generalized empirical method (...)
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1 — 50 / 4883