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  1. added 2015-07-01
    Caleb Dewey & Garri Hovhannisyan, Inductive Theories Are Cognitive Metaphors.
    For decades, metaphors have been known to be very important within science. Recently, Brown (2008) strengthened their importance so far as to argue that all scientific models are metaphors (in the cognitive sense). We stretch their importance even further to say that all scientific theories are cognitive metaphors as long as those theories are yielded by a coherent account of induction. Since standard induction is incoherent, as per Hume and Duhem, we primarily concern ourselves with defining a coherent account of (...)
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  2. added 2015-06-30
    Christopher G. Lucas & Charles Kemp (forthcoming). An Improved Probabilistic Account of Counterfactual Reasoning. Psychological Review.
    When people want to identify the causes of an event, assign credit or blame, or learn from their mistakes, they often reflect on how things could have gone differently. In this kind of reasoning, one considers a counterfactual world in which some events are different from their real-world counterparts and considers what else would have changed. Researchers have recently proposed several probabilistic models that aim to capture how people do (or should) reason about counterfactuals. We present a new model and (...)
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  3. added 2015-06-26
    Gabriel Vacariu, The Unbelievable Similarities Between My Ideas (Philosophy of Mind, Cognitive Neuroscience, Physics, Mainly From 2005-2008) and the Ideas of Other People (From 2011-2014).
    http://filosofie.unibuc.ro/cv_gabriel_vacariu/.
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  4. added 2015-06-26
    Kevin J. Riggs, Emily Mather, Grace Hyde & Andrew Simpson (2015). Parallels Between Action‐Object Mapping and Word‐Object Mapping in Young Children. Cognitive Science 39 (4).
    Across a series of four experiments with 3- to 4-year-olds we demonstrate how cognitive mechanisms supporting noun learning extend to the mapping of actions to objects. In Experiment 1 the demonstration of a novel action led children to select a novel, rather than a familiar object. In Experiment 2 children exhibited long-term retention of novel action-object mappings and extended these actions to other category members. In Experiment 3 we showed that children formed an accurate sensorimotor record of the novel action. (...)
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  5. added 2015-06-25
    Hannes Rusch & Eckart Voland (forthcoming). Human Agricultural Economy is, and Likely Always Was, Largely Based on Kinship. Why? Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
    Commentary on J. Gowdy & L. Krall "The economic origins of ultrasociality": We question the sequence of evolutionary transitions leading to ultrasociality in humans proposed by Gowdy & Krall. Evidence indicates that families are, and likely always have been, the primary productive units in human agricultural economies, suggesting that genetic relatedness is key to understanding when the suppression of individual autonomy to the benefit of subsistence groups, i.e. extended families, evolved.
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  6. added 2015-06-25
    Winfried Menninghaus, Isabel C. Bohrn, Christine A. Knoop, Sonja A. Kotz, Wolff Schlotz & Arthur M. Jacobs (2015). Rhetorical Features Facilitate Prosodic Processing While Handicapping Ease of Semantic Comprehension. Cognition 143:48-60.
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  7. added 2015-06-25
    Andrea Ravignani, Gesche Westphal-Fitch, Ulrike Aust, Martin M. Schlumpp & W. Tecumseh Fitch (2015). More Than One Way to See It: Individual Heuristics in Avian Visual Computation. Cognition 143:13-24.
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  8. added 2015-06-25
    Gesine Lenore Schiewer (2015). Interkulturelle Philologie am Beispiel der Interpretation von Chamisso-Literatur: Ansätze der Linguistik unter Berücksichtigung der Mehrsprachigkeitsforschung. In Jan Borkowski, Stefan Descher, Felicitas Ferder & Philipp David Heine (eds.), Literatur interpretieren: Interdisziplinäre Beiträge zur Theorie und Praxis. Mentis. 361-387.
    Die Diskussion von Fragestellungen, Zielsetzungen und Methoden interkultureller Literaturwissenschaft ist ein wesentlicher Teil der sich gegenwärtig in dynamischer Entwicklung befindlichen Disziplin. Weitgehend unstrittig ist dabei die grundsätzliche Rolle, die als interkulturell bezeichneten literarischen Texten zugesprochen wird im Hinblick auf die Förderung des Fremdverstehens anderer Kulturen beziehungsweise des Verstehens der Denk-, Verhaltens-, und Kommunikationsgepflogenheiten von Menschen anderer Sprach- und Ethniezugehörigkeit. Dies setzt jedoch angemessene Formen des wissenschaftlichen Zugangs zu solchen Texten einschließlich der Frage ihrer Interpretation voraus, sodass die entsprechenden spezifischen Aufgaben (...)
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  9. added 2015-06-24
    Padraic Monaghan, Ut Na Sio, Sum Wai Lau, Hoi Kei Woo, Sally A. Linkenauger & Thomas C. Ormerod (2015). Sleep Promotes Analogical Transfer in Problem Solving. Cognition 143:25-30.
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  10. added 2015-06-24
    Yingying Wang, Zhijun Cao, Zijian Zhu, Huaqian Cai & Yanhong Wu (2015). Cue-Independent Forgetting by Intentional Suppression – Evidence for Inhibition as the Mechanism of Intentional Forgetting. Cognition 143:31-35.
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  11. added 2015-06-24
    Adriel John Orena, Rachel M. Theodore & Linda Polka (2015). Language Exposure Facilitates Talker Learning Prior to Language Comprehension, Even in Adults. Cognition 143:36-40.
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  12. added 2015-06-24
    Flavia Mancini, Hannah Steinitz, James Steckelmacher, Gian Domenico Iannetti & Patrick Haggard (2015). Poor Judgment of Distance Between Nociceptive Stimuli. Cognition 143:41-47.
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  13. added 2015-06-23
    Ezequiel Morsella, Christine A. Godwin, Tiffany K. Jantz, Stephen C. Krieger & Adam Gazzaley (forthcoming). Homing in on Consciousness in the Nervous System: An Action-Based Synthesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences:1-106.
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  14. added 2015-06-23
    Katya Tentori, Nick Chater & Vincenzo Crupi (2015). Judging the Probability of Hypotheses Versus the Impact of Evidence: Which Form of Inductive Inference Is More Accurate and Time‐Consistent? Cognitive Science 39 (4).
    Inductive reasoning requires exploiting links between evidence and hypotheses. This can be done focusing either on the posterior probability of the hypothesis when updated on the new evidence or on the impact of the new evidence on the credibility of the hypothesis. But are these two cognitive representations equally reliable? This study investigates this question by comparing probability and impact judgments on the same experimental materials. The results indicate that impact judgments are more consistent in time and more accurate than (...)
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  15. added 2015-06-23
    Thomas T. Hills, Peter M. Todd & Michael N. Jones (2015). Foraging in Semantic Fields: How We Search Through Memory. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2).
    When searching for concepts in memory—as in the verbal fluency task of naming all the animals one can think of—people appear to explore internal mental representations in much the same way that animals forage in physical space: searching locally within patches of information before transitioning globally between patches. However, the definition of the patches being searched in mental space is not well specified. Do we search by activating explicit predefined categories and recall items from within that category , or do (...)
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  16. added 2015-06-23
    Ashley E. Walton, Michael J. Richardson, Peter Langland-Hassan & Anthony Chemero (2015). Improvisation and the Self-Organization of Multiple Musical Bodies. Frontiers in Psychology 6 (313):1-9.
  17. added 2015-06-23
    Peter Langland-Hassan, Frank R. Faries, Michael J. Richardson & Aimee Dietz (2015). Inner Speech Deficits in Aphasia. Frontiers in Psychology 6 (528):1-10.
    Despite the ubiquity of inner speech in our mental lives, methods for objectively assessing inner speech capacities remain underdeveloped. The most common means of assessing inner speech is to present participants with tasks requiring them to silently judge whether two words rhyme. We developed a version of this task to assess the inner speech of a population of patients with aphasia and corresponding language production deficits. Patients’ performance on the silent rhyming task was severely impaired relative to controls. Patients’ performance (...)
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  18. added 2015-06-20
    Andreas Elpidorou (2014). The Bright Side of Boredom. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  19. added 2015-06-19
    Bence Nanay (2015). Cognitive Penetration and the Gallery of Indiscernibles. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Danto's Gallery of Indiscernibles thought experiment only works if we make assumptions about the cognitive impenetrability of perception, which we have strong empirical reasons to reject.
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  20. added 2015-06-18
    David J. Stevens, Joanne Arciuli & David I. Anderson (2015). Statistical Learning Is Not Affected by a Prior Bout of Physical Exercise. Cognitive Science 39 (4):n/a-n/a.
    This study examined the effect of a prior bout of exercise on implicit cognition. Specifically, we examined whether a prior bout of moderate intensity exercise affected performance on a statistical learning task in healthy adults. A total of 42 participants were allocated to one of three conditions—a control group, a group that exercised for 15 min prior to the statistical learning task, and a group that exercised for 30 min prior to the statistical learning task. The participants in the exercise (...)
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  21. added 2015-06-16
    Wayne D. Gray (forthcoming). Introduction to Volume 7, Issue 3 oftopiCS. Topics in Cognitive Science:n/a-n/a.
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  22. added 2015-06-15
    Alberto Testolin, Ivilin Stoianov, Alessandro Sperduti & Marco Zorzi (2015). Learning Orthographic Structure With Sequential Generative Neural Networks. Cognitive Science 39 (4).
    Learning the structure of event sequences is a ubiquitous problem in cognition and particularly in language. One possible solution is to learn a probabilistic generative model of sequences that allows making predictions about upcoming events. Though appealing from a neurobiological standpoint, this approach is typically not pursued in connectionist modeling. Here, we investigated a sequential version of the restricted Boltzmann machine , a stochastic recurrent neural network that extracts high-order structure from sensory data through unsupervised generative learning and can encode (...)
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  23. added 2015-06-15
    Wayne D. Gray (2015). Introduction to Volume 7, Issue 3 of topiCS. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2).
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  24. added 2015-06-14
    Ray Scott Percival (forthcoming). Does the New Classicism Need Evolutionary Theory? In Elizabeth Millán (ed.), After the Avant-Gardes. Open Court Publishers. 109-125.
    In what way might the new classicism gain support from evolutionary theory? My rough answer is that evolutionary theory can help defend a return to more classical artistic standards and also explain why classical standards are not simply imposed by social conditioning or by powerful elites, but arise naturally from something more fundamental in the human constitution. Classical standards and themes are an expression of our evolutionary history. The mind can be seen as a biological organ or function, produced by (...)
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  25. added 2015-06-13
    Tristan Mahr, Brianna T. M. McMillan, Jenny R. Saffran, Susan Ellis Weismer & Jan Edwards (2015). Anticipatory Coarticulation Facilitates Word Recognition in Toddlers. Cognition 142:345-350.
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  26. added 2015-06-13
    Kayleigh Carr, Rachel L. Kendal & Emma G. Flynn (2015). Imitate or Innovate? Children’s Innovation is Influenced by the Efficacy of Observed Behaviour. Cognition 142:322-332.
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  27. added 2015-06-13
    Tali Kleiman, Noa Sher, Andrey Elster & Ruth Mayo (2015). Accessibility is a Matter of Trust: Dispositional and Contextual Distrust Blocks Accessibility Effects. Cognition 142:333-344.
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  28. added 2015-06-12
    Kevin A. Smith & Edward Vul (2015). The Role of Sequential Dependence in Creative Semantic Search. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2).
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  29. added 2015-06-12
    Wai‐Tat Fu, Thomas Hills & Peter M. Todd (2015). Interfacing Mind and Environment: The Central Role of Search in Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Search can be found in almost every cognitive activity, ranging across vision, memory retrieval, problem solving, decision making, foraging, and social interaction. Because of its ubiquity, research on search has a tendency to fragment into multiple areas of cognitive science. The proposed topic aims at providing integrative discussion of the central role of search from multiple perspectives. We focus on controlled search processes, which require a goal, uncertainty about the nature, location, or acquisition method of the objects to be searched (...)
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  30. added 2015-06-10
    Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert (forthcoming). Color Relationalism and Relativism. Topics in Cognitive Science.
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  31. added 2015-06-10
    Robert M. Ellis (2015). Middle Way Philosophy 4: The Integration of Belief. Lulu.
    This fourth volume of the Middle Way Philosophy series uses cognitive psychology and balanced sceptical philosophy to explain both how we get stuck in dogmas, and how provisionality is possible. It is argued that we can make progress both in avoiding delusions and developing wisdom not by finding ‘truth’ or employing ‘rationality’, but rather through awareness of our assumptions. We need not ultimately true beliefs (as is often assumed), but judgements that are more adequate to each new set of conditions. (...)
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  32. added 2015-06-09
    George Ainslie (2015). Psychopathology Arises From Intertemporal Bargaining as Well as From Emotional Trauma. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  33. added 2015-06-09
    William J. Whelton (2015). Memory Reconsolidation and Self-Reorganization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  34. added 2015-06-09
    Lawrence Patihis (2015). Let's Be Skeptical About Reconsolidation and Emotional Arousal in Therapy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  35. added 2015-06-09
    Stanley B. Klein & Hans J. Markowitsch (2015). The Nature of the Semantic/Episodic Memory Distinction: A Missing Piece of the “Working Through” Process. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  36. added 2015-06-09
    Valerie F. Reyna & Yulia Landa (2015). Multiple Traces or Fuzzy Traces? Converging Evidence for Applications of Modern Cognitive Theory to Psychotherapy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  37. added 2015-06-09
    Charles Levin (2015). Memory Reconsolidation, Repeating, and Working Through: Science and Culture in Psychotherapeutic Research and Practice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  38. added 2015-06-09
    Rainer Spanagel & Martin Bohus (2015). Disruption of Reconsolidation Processes is a Balancing Act – Can It Really Account for Change in Psychotherapy? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  39. added 2015-06-09
    Oana Benga, Bogdan Neagota & Ileana Benga (2015). The Importance of the Rites of Passage in Assigning Semantic Structures to Autobiographical Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  40. added 2015-06-09
    Antonio Pascual-Leone & Juan Pascual-Leone (2015). Memory Reconsolidation Keeps Track of Emotional Changes, but What Will Explain the Actual “Processing”? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  41. added 2015-06-09
    Susanne Diekelmann & Cecilia Forcato (2015). Changing Maladaptive Memories Through Reconsolidation: A Role for Sleep in Psychotherapy? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  42. added 2015-06-09
    Richard D. Lane, Lynn Nadel, Leslie Greenberg & Lee Ryan (2015). The Integrated Memory Model: A New Framework for Understanding the Mechanisms of Change in Psychotherapy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  43. added 2015-06-09
    Maria Stein, Kristina Barbara Rohde & Katharina Henke (2015). Focus on Emotion as a Catalyst of Memory Updating During Reconsolidation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  44. added 2015-06-09
    Francesco Mancini & Amelia Gangemi (2015). The Relevance of Maintaining and Worsening Processes in Psychopathology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  45. added 2015-06-09
    Carlos Montemayor (2015). Trade-Offs Between the Accuracy and Integrity of Autobiographical Narrative in Memory Reconsolidation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  46. added 2015-06-09
    Chris R. Brewin (2015). Reconsolidation Versus Retrieval Competition: Rival Hypotheses to Explain Memory Change in Psychotherapy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  47. added 2015-06-09
    Felipe De Brigard & Eleanor Hanna (2015). Clinical Applications of Counterfactual Thinking During Memory Reactivation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  48. added 2015-06-09
    Kevin S. LaBar (2015). Therapeutic Affect Reduction, Emotion Regulation, and Emotional Memory Reconsolidation: A Neuroscientific Quandary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  49. added 2015-06-09
    Israel Liberzon & Arash Javanbakht (2015). Memory Reconsolidation and Psychotherapeutic Process. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  50. added 2015-06-09
    Ulrich von Hecker, Daniel N. McIntosh & Grzegorz Sedek (2015). Mental Model Construction, Not Just Memory, is a Central Component of Cognitive Change in Psychotherapy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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