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  1. added 2015-04-19
    Benjamin D. Young (2014). Smelling Phenomenal. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Qualitative-consciousness arises at the sensory level of olfactory processing and pervades our experience of smells to the extent that qualitative character is maintained whenever we are aware of undergoing an olfactory experience. Building upon the distinction between Access and Phenomenal Consciousness the paper offers a nuanced distinction between Awareness and Qualitative-consciousness that is applicable to olfaction in a manner that is conceptual precise and empirically viable. Mounting empirical research is offered substantiating the applicability of the distinction to olfaction and showing (...)
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  2. added 2015-04-14
    Paola Escudero, Karen E. Mulak & Haley A. Vlach (2015). Cross‐Situational Learning of Minimal Word Pairs. Cognitive Science 39 (3):n/a-n/a.
    Cross-situational statistical learning of words involves tracking co-occurrences of auditory words and objects across time to infer word-referent mappings. Previous research has demonstrated that learners can infer referents across sets of very phonologically distinct words , but it remains unknown whether learners can encode fine phonological differences during cross-situational statistical learning. This study examined learners’ cross-situational statistical learning of minimal pairs that differed on one consonant segment , minimal pairs that differed on one vowel segment , and non-minimal pairs that (...)
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  3. added 2015-04-11
    Sergeiy Sandler (forthcoming). Fictive Interaction and the Nature of Linguistic Meaning. In Esther Pascual & Sergeiy Sandler (eds.), The conversation frame: Forms and functions of fictive interaction. John Benjamins.
    One may distinguish between three broad conceptions of linguistic meaning. One conception, which I will call “logical”, views meaning as given in reference (for words) and truth (for sentences). Another conception, the “monological” one, seeks meaning in the cognitive capacities of the single mind. A third, “dialogical”, conception attributes meaning to interaction between individuals and personal perspectives. In this chapter I directly contrast how well these three approaches deal with the evidence brought forth by fictive interaction. I examine instances of (...)
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  4. added 2015-04-11
    Helen Fischer & Cleotilde Gonzalez (2015). Making Sense of Dynamic Systems: How Our Understanding of Stocks and Flows Depends on a Global Perspective. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
    Stocks and flows are building blocks of dynamic systems: Stocks change through inflows and outflows, such as our bank balance changing with withdrawals and deposits, or atmospheric CO2 with absorptions and emissions. However, people make systematic errors when trying to infer the behavior of dynamic systems, termed SF failure, whose cognitive explanations are yet unknown. We argue that SF failure appears when people focus on specific system elements , rather than on the system structure and gestalt . Using a standard (...)
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  5. added 2015-04-11
    Amy M. Guthormsen, Kristie J. Fisher, Miriam Bassok, Lee Osterhout, Melissa DeWolf & Keith J. Holyoak (2015). Conceptual Integration of Arithmetic Operations With Real‐World Knowledge: Evidence From Event‐Related Potentials. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
    Research on language processing has shown that the disruption of conceptual integration gives rise to specific patterns of event-related brain potentials —N400 and P600 effects. Here, we report similar ERP effects when adults performed cross-domain conceptual integration of analogous semantic and mathematical relations. In a problem-solving task, when participants generated labeled answers to semantically aligned and misaligned arithmetic problems , the second object label in misaligned problems yielded an N400 effect for addition problems. In a verification task, when participants judged (...)
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  6. added 2015-04-09
    Deena Skolnick Weisberg & Alison Gopnik (2015). Which Counterfactuals Matter? A Response to Beck. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
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  7. added 2015-04-09
    Benjamin Swets & Christopher A. Kurby (2015). Eye Movements Reveal the Influence of Event Structure on Reading Behavior. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
    When we read narrative texts such as novels and newspaper articles, we segment information presented in such texts into discrete events, with distinct boundaries between those events. But do our eyes reflect this event structure while reading? This study examines whether eye movements during the reading of discourse reveal how readers respond online to event structure. Participants read narrative passages as we monitored their eye movements. Several measures revealed that event structure predicted eye movements. In two experiments, we found that (...)
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  8. added 2015-04-09
    Sarah R. Beck (2015). Counterfactuals Matter: A Reply to Weisberg & Gopnik. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
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  9. added 2015-04-07
    Michael S. C. Thomas, Neil A. Forrester & Angelica Ronald (2015). Multiscale Modeling of Gene–Behavior Associations in an Artificial Neural Network Model of Cognitive Development. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
    In the multidisciplinary field of developmental cognitive neuroscience, statistical associations between levels of description play an increasingly important role. One example of such associations is the observation of correlations between relatively common gene variants and individual differences in behavior. It is perhaps surprising that such associations can be detected despite the remoteness of these levels of description, and the fact that behavior is the outcome of an extended developmental process involving interaction of the whole organism with a variable environment. Given (...)
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  10. added 2015-04-06
    Stan Klein & Chloe Steindam (forthcoming). The Role of Subjective Temporality in Future-Oriented Mental Time Travel. In Klein & Szpunar Michaelian (ed.), Seeing the Future: Theoretical Perspectives on Future-Oriented Mental Time Travel. Oxford University Press.
    In this chapter we examine the tendency to view future-oriented mental time travel (FMTT) as a unitary faculty that, despite task-driven surface variation, ultimately reduces to a common phenomenological state (supported primarily by episodic memory). We review evidence that FMTT is neither unitary nor beholden to episodic memory: Rather, it is varied both in its memorial underpinnings and experiential realization. We conclude that the phenomenological diversity characterizing FMTT is dependent not on the type of memory (i.e., episodic versus semantic) activated (...)
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  11. added 2015-04-05
    Sarah R. Beck (2015). Why What Is Counterfactual Really Matters: A Response to Weisberg and Gopnik (). Cognitive Science 39 (2):n/a-n/a.
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  12. added 2015-04-05
    Sarah C. Creel (2015). Ups and Downs in Auditory Development: Preschoolers’ Sensitivity to Pitch Contour and Timbre. Cognitive Science 39 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Much research has explored developing sound representations in language, but less work addresses developing representations of other sound patterns. This study examined preschool children's musical representations using two different tasks: discrimination and sound–picture association. Melodic contour—a musically relevant property—and instrumental timbre, which is less musically relevant, were tested. In Experiment 1, children failed to associate cartoon characters to melodies with maximally different pitch contours, with no advantage for melody preexposure. Experiment 2 also used different-contour melodies and found good discrimination, whereas (...)
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  13. added 2015-04-04
    Jakub Ryszard Matyja (2015). Mearleau-Ponty Meets Enactivism. A Book Review. [REVIEW] Avant. The Journal of the Philosophical-Interdisciplinary Vanguard (3):160-163.
    A book review of 'The Intercorporeal Self. Merleau-Ponty on Subjectivity'.
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  14. added 2015-04-04
    Eldad Yechiam, Matan Retzer, Ariel Telpaz & Guy Hochman (2015). Losses as Ecological Guides: Minor Losses Lead to Maximization and Not to Avoidance. Cognition 139:10-17.
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  15. added 2015-04-04
    Przemysław Nowakowski (2015). On Embodiment in Predictions. A Book Review. [REVIEW] Avant. The Journal of the Philosophical-Interdisciplinary Vanguard (3):155-159.
  16. added 2015-04-04
    Rick A. Adams, Harriet R. Brown & Karl J. Friston (2015). Bayesian Inference, Predictive Coding and Delusions. Avant. The Journal of the Philosophical-Interdisciplinary Vanguard (3):51-88.
    This paper considers psychotic symptoms in terms of false inferences or beliefs. It is based on the notion that the brain is an organ of inference that actively constructs hypotheses to explain or predict its sensations. This perspective provides a normative (Bayes optimal) account of action and perception that emphasises probabilistic representations; in particular, the confidence or precision of beliefs about the world. We consider sensory attenuation deficits, catatonia and delusions as various expressions of the same core pathology: namely, an (...)
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  17. added 2015-04-04
    Jakob Hohwy (2015). Reflections on Predictive Processing and the Mind. An Interview. Avant. The Journal of the Philosophical-Interdisciplinary Vanguard (3):145-152.
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  18. added 2015-04-04
    Robert M. French & Elizabeth Thomas (2015). Interactive Effects of Explicit Emergent Structure: A Major Challenge for Cognitive Computational Modeling. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1).
    David Marr's three-level analysis of computational cognition argues for three distinct levels of cognitive information processing—namely, the computational, representational, and implementational levels. But Marr's levels are—and were meant to be—descriptive, rather than interactive and dynamic. For this reason, we suggest that, had Marr been writing today, he might well have gone even farther in his analysis, including the emergence of structure—in particular, explicit structure at the conceptual level—from lower levels, and the effect of explicit emergent structures on the level that (...)
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  19. added 2015-04-04
    Garry Young (2015). Amending the Revisionist Model of the Capgras Delusion: A Further Argument for the Role of Patient Experience in Delusional Belief Formation. Avant. The Journal of the Philosophical-Interdisciplinary Vanguard (3):89-112.
    Recent papers on the Capgras delusion have focused on the role played by subpersonal abductive inference in the formation and maintenance of the delusional belief. In these accounts, the delusional belief is posited as the first delusion-related event of which the patient is conscious. As a consequence, an explanatory role for anomalous patient experience is denied. The aim of this paper is to challenge this revisionist position and to integrate subpersonal inference within a model of the Capgras delusion which includes (...)
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  20. added 2015-04-01
    Bradley C. Love (2015). The Algorithmic Level Is the Bridge Between Computation and Brain. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Every scientist chooses a preferred level of analysis and this choice shapes the research program, even determining what counts as evidence. This contribution revisits Marr's three levels of analysis and evaluates the prospect of making progress at each individual level. After reviewing limitations of theorizing within a level, two strategies for integration across levels are considered. One is top–down in that it attempts to build a bridge from the computational to algorithmic level. Limitations of this approach include insufficient theoretical constraint (...)
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  21. added 2015-04-01
    Pavel Logačev & Shravan Vasishth (2015). A Multiple‐Channel Model of Task‐Dependent Ambiguity Resolution in Sentence Comprehension. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
    Traxler, Pickering, and Clifton found that ambiguous sentences are read faster than their unambiguous counterparts. This so-called ambiguity advantage has presented a major challenge to classical theories of human sentence comprehension because its most prominent explanation, in the form of the unrestricted race model , assumes that parsing is non-deterministic. Recently, Swets, Desmet, Clifton, and Ferreira have challenged the URM. They argue that readers strategically underspecify the representation of ambiguous sentences to save time, unless disambiguation is required by task demands. (...)
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  22. added 2015-04-01
    A. Mike Burton, Robin S. S. Kramer, Kay L. Ritchie & Rob Jenkins (2015). Identity From Variation: Representations of Faces Derived From Multiple Instances. Cognitive Science 39 (3):n/a-n/a.
    Research in face recognition has tended to focus on discriminating between individuals, or “telling people apart.” It has recently become clear that it is also necessary to understand how images of the same person can vary, or “telling people together.” Learning a new face, and tracking its representation as it changes from unfamiliar to familiar, involves an abstraction of the variability in different images of that person's face. Here, we present an application of principal components analysis computed across different photos (...)
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  23. added 2015-03-29
    Janet H. Hsiao & Kit Cheung (2015). Visual Similarity of Words Alone Can Modulate Hemispheric Lateralization in Visual Word Recognition: Evidence From Modeling Chinese Character Recognition. Cognitive Science 39 (3):n/a-n/a.
    In Chinese orthography, the most common character structure consists of a semantic radical on the left and a phonetic radical on the right ; the minority, opposite arrangement also exists . Recent studies showed that SP character processing is more left hemisphere lateralized than PS character processing. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this is due to phonetic radical position or character type frequency. Through computational modeling with artificial lexicons, in which we implement a theory of hemispheric asymmetry in perception but (...)
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  24. added 2015-03-28
    Rui Mata & Bettina Helversen (2015). Search and the Aging Mind: The Promise and Limits of the Cognitive Control Hypothesis of Age Differences in Search. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):n/a-n/a.
    Search is a prerequisite for successful performance in a broad range of tasks ranging from making decisions between consumer goods to memory retrieval. How does aging impact search processes in such disparate situations? Aging is associated with structural and neuromodulatory brain changes that underlie cognitive control processes, which in turn have been proposed as a domain-general mechanism controlling search in external environments as well as memory. We review the aging literature to evaluate the cognitive control hypothesis that suggests that age-related (...)
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  25. added 2015-03-28
    J. R. Hall, E. M. Bernat & C. J. Patrick (2007). Externalizing Psychopatholog Yand the Error-Related Negativity. Psychological Science 18 (4):326-333.
    Prior research has demonstrated that antisocial behavior, substance-use disorders, and personality dimensions of aggression and impulsivity are indicators of a highly heritable underlying dimension of risk, labeled externalizing. Other work has shown that individual trait constructs within this psychopathology spectrum are associated with reduced self-monitoring, as reflected by amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN) brain response. In this study of undergraduate subjects, reduced ERN amplitude was associated with higher scores on a self-report measure of the broad externalizing construct that links (...)
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  26. added 2015-03-26
    Judith Degen & Michael K. Tanenhaus (2015). Availability of Alternatives and the Processing of Scalar Implicatures: A Visual World Eye‐Tracking Study. Cognitive Science 39 (3):n/a-n/a.
    Two visual world experiments investigated the processing of the implicature associated with some using a “gumball paradigm.” On each trial, participants saw an image of a gumball machine with an upper chamber with orange and blue gumballs and an empty lower chamber. Gumballs dropped to the lower chamber, creating a contrast between a partitioned set of gumballs of one color and an unpartitioned set of the other. Participants then evaluated spoken statements, such as “You got some of the blue gumballs.” (...)
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  27. added 2015-03-25
    Derek Powell, Zachary Horne, Ángel Pinillos & Keith Holyoak (2015). A Bayesian Framework for Knowledge Attribution: Evidence From Semantic Integration. Cognition 139:92-104.
    We propose a Bayesian framework for the attribution of knowledge, and apply this framework to generate novel predictions about knowledge attribution for different types of “Gettier cases”, in which an agent is led to a justified true belief yet has made erroneous assumptions. We tested these predictions using a paradigm based on semantic integration. We coded the frequencies with which participants falsely recalled the word “thought” as “knew” (or a near synonym), yielding an implicit measure of conceptual activation. Our experiments (...)
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  28. added 2015-03-24
    Teresa Marques (2015). Disagreeing in Context. Frontiers in Psychology 6 (257):1-12.
    This paper argues for contextualism about predicates of personal taste and evaluative predicates in general, and offers a proposal of how apparently resilient disagreements are to be explained. The present proposal is complementary to others that have been made in the recent literature. Several authors, for instance (López de Sa, 2008; Sundell, 2011; Huvenes, 2012; Marques and García-Carpintero, 2014; Marques, 2014a), have recently defended semantic contextualism for those kinds of predicates from the accusation that it faces the problem of lost (...)
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  29. added 2015-03-24
    Larisa Heiphetz, Jonathan D. Lane, Adam Waytz & Liane L. Young (2015). How Children and Adults Represent God's Mind. Cognitive Science 39 (3):n/a-n/a.
    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of religious cognition. First, we show that although adults explicitly discriminate supernatural minds from human minds, their implicit responses reveal far less discrimination. Next, we demonstrate that children's religious cognition often matches adults' implicit (...)
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  30. added 2015-03-24
    Samuel J. Gershman & Yael Niv (2015). Novelty and Inductive Generalization in Human Reinforcement Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):n/a-n/a.
    In reinforcement learning , a decision maker searching for the most rewarding option is often faced with the question: What is the value of an option that has never been tried before? One way to frame this question is as an inductive problem: How can I generalize my previous experience with one set of options to a novel option? We show how hierarchical Bayesian inference can be used to solve this problem, and we describe an equivalence between the Bayesian model (...)
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  31. added 2015-03-24
    Zachary Horne, Derek Powell & John Hummel (2015). A Single Counterexample Leads to Moral Belief Revision. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
    What kind of evidence will lead people to revise their moral beliefs? Moral beliefs are often strongly held convictions, and existing research has shown that morality is rooted in emotion and socialization rather than deliberative reasoning. In addition, more general issues—such as confirmation bias—further impede coherent belief revision. Here, we explored a unique means for inducing belief revision. In two experiments, participants considered a moral dilemma in which an overwhelming majority of people judged that it was inappropriate to take action (...)
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  32. added 2015-03-23
    Anne E. Riggs, Martha W. Alibali & Charles W. Kalish (2015). Leave Her Out of It: Person‐Presentation of Strategies Is Harmful for Transfer. Cognitive Science 39 (3):n/a-n/a.
    A common practice in textbooks is to introduce concepts or strategies in association with specific people. This practice aligns with research suggesting that using “real-world” contexts in textbooks increases students’ motivation and engagement. However, other research suggests this practice may interfere with transfer by distracting students or leading them to tie new knowledge too closely to the original learning context. The current study investigates the effects on learning and transfer of connecting mathematics strategies to specific people. A total of 180 (...)
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  33. added 2015-03-22
    Peng Zhou, Stephen Crain & Likan Zhan (2014). Grammatical Aspect and Event Recognition in Children’s Online Sentence Comprehension. Cognition 133 (1):262-276.
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  34. added 2015-03-22
    Lauriane Rat-Fischer, J. Kevin O’Regan & Jacqueline Fagard (2014). Comparison of Active and Purely Visual Performance in a Multiple-String Means-End Task in Infants. Cognition 133 (1):304-316.
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  35. added 2015-03-22
    William S. Bush & Shaun P. Vecera (2014). Differential Effect of One Versus Two Hands on Visual Processing. Cognition 133 (1):232-237.
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  36. added 2015-03-22
    Holly S. S. L. Joseph, Elizabeth Wonnacott, Paul Forbes & Kate Nation (2014). Becoming a Written Word: Eye Movements Reveal Order of Acquisition Effects Following Incidental Exposure to New Words During Silent Reading. Cognition 133 (1):238-248.
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  37. added 2015-03-22
    Maria Staudte, Matthew W. Crocker, Alexis Heloir & Michael Kipp (2014). The Influence of Speaker Gaze on Listener Comprehension: Contrasting Visual Versus Intentional Accounts. Cognition 133 (1):317-328.
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  38. added 2015-03-22
    Konika Banerjee & Paul Bloom (2014). Why Did This Happen to Me? Religious Believers’ and Non-Believers’ Teleological Reasoning About Life Events. Cognition 133 (1):277-303.
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  39. added 2015-03-21
    Richard Brown (2014). Consciousness Doesn't Overflow Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 5 (1399):10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01399.
  40. added 2015-03-20
    Juemin Xu & Nigel Harvey (forthcoming). Carry on Winning: No Selection Effect. Cognition.
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  41. added 2015-03-20
    Nadja Althaus & Kim Plunkett (2015). Timing Matters: The Impact of Label Synchrony on Infant Categorisation. Cognition 139:1-9.
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  42. added 2015-03-20
    Tamar Kushnir, Alison Gopnik, Nadia Chernyak, Elizabeth Seiver & Henry M. Wellman (2015). Developing Intuitions About Free Will Between Ages Four and Six. Cognition 138:79-101.
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  43. added 2015-03-20
    Angelo Turri & John Turri (2015). The Truth About Lying. Cognition 138:161-168.
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  44. added 2015-03-20
    N. Karsh & B. Eitam (2015). I Control Therefore I Do: Judgments of Agency Influence Action Selection. Cognition 138:122-131.
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  45. added 2015-03-20
    Antonia Thelen, Durk Talsma & Micah M. Murray (2015). Single-Trial Multisensory Memories Affect Later Auditory and Visual Object Discrimination. Cognition 138:148-160.
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  46. added 2015-03-20
    Douglas B. Markant, Burr Settles & Todd M. Gureckis (2015). Self‐Directed Learning Favors Local, Rather Than Global, Uncertainty. Cognitive Science 39 (3).
    Collecting information that one expects to be useful is a powerful way to facilitate learning. However, relatively little is known about how people decide which information is worth sampling over the course of learning. We describe several alternative models of how people might decide to collect a piece of information inspired by “active learning” research in machine learning. We additionally provide a theoretical analysis demonstrating the situations under which these models are empirically distinguishable, and we report a novel empirical study (...)
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  47. added 2015-03-20
    Darko Odic, Mathieu Le Corre & Justin Halberda (2015). Children’s Mappings Between Number Words and the Approximate Number System. Cognition 138:102-121.
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  48. added 2015-03-20
    Helene Intraub, Frank Morelli & Kristin M. Gagnier (2015). Visual, Haptic and Bimodal Scene Perception: Evidence for a Unitary Representation. Cognition 138:132-147.
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  49. added 2015-03-20
    Holly S. S. L. Joseph, Elizabeth Wonnacott, Paul Forbes & Kate Nation (2015). Corrigendum to “Becoming a Written Word: Eye Movements Reveal Order of Acquisition Effects Following Incidental Exposure to New Words During Silent Reading” [Cognition 133/1 238–248]. [REVIEW] Cognition 134:257.
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  50. added 2015-03-20
    Kurt Gray (2014). Harm Concerns Predict Moral Judgments of Suicide: Comment on Rottman, Kelemen and Young. Cognition 133 (1):329-331.
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