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  1. added 2015-03-29
    Janet H. Hsiao & Kit Cheung (2015). Visual Similarity of Words Alone Can Modulate Hemispheric Lateralization in Visual Word Recognition: Evidence From Modeling Chinese Character Recognition. Cognitive Science 39 (2):n/a-n/a.
    In Chinese orthography, the most common character structure consists of a semantic radical on the left and a phonetic radical on the right ; the minority, opposite arrangement also exists . Recent studies showed that SP character processing is more left hemisphere lateralized than PS character processing. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this is due to phonetic radical position or character type frequency. Through computational modeling with artificial lexicons, in which we implement a theory of hemispheric asymmetry in perception but (...)
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  2. added 2015-03-28
    Rui Mata & Bettina Helversen (2015). Search and the Aging Mind: The Promise and Limits of the Cognitive Control Hypothesis of Age Differences in Search. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1).
    Search is a prerequisite for successful performance in a broad range of tasks ranging from making decisions between consumer goods to memory retrieval. How does aging impact search processes in such disparate situations? Aging is associated with structural and neuromodulatory brain changes that underlie cognitive control processes, which in turn have been proposed as a domain-general mechanism controlling search in external environments as well as memory. We review the aging literature to evaluate the cognitive control hypothesis that suggests that age-related (...)
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  3. added 2015-03-28
    J. R. Hall, E. M. Bernat & C. J. Patrick (2007). Externalizing Psychopatholog Yand the Error-Related Negativity. Psychological Science 18 (4):326-333.
    Prior research has demonstrated that antisocial behavior, substance-use disorders, and personality dimensions of aggression and impulsivity are indicators of a highly heritable underlying dimension of risk, labeled externalizing. Other work has shown that individual trait constructs within this psychopathology spectrum are associated with reduced self-monitoring, as reflected by amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN) brain response. In this study of undergraduate subjects, reduced ERN amplitude was associated with higher scores on a self-report measure of the broad externalizing construct that links (...)
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  4. added 2015-03-26
    Judith Degen & Michael K. Tanenhaus (2015). Availability of Alternatives and the Processing of Scalar Implicatures: A Visual World Eye‐Tracking Study. Cognitive Science 39 (2).
    Two visual world experiments investigated the processing of the implicature associated with some using a “gumball paradigm.” On each trial, participants saw an image of a gumball machine with an upper chamber with orange and blue gumballs and an empty lower chamber. Gumballs dropped to the lower chamber, creating a contrast between a partitioned set of gumballs of one color and an unpartitioned set of the other. Participants then evaluated spoken statements, such as “You got some of the blue gumballs.” (...)
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  5. added 2015-03-25
    Derek Powell, Zachary Horne, Ángel Pinillos & Keith Holyoak (2015). A Bayesian Framework for Knowledge Attribution: Evidence From Semantic Integration. Cognition 139:92-104.
    We propose a Bayesian framework for the attribution of knowledge, and apply this framework to generate novel predictions about knowledge attribution for different types of “Gettier cases”, in which an agent is led to a justified true belief yet has made erroneous assumptions. We tested these predictions using a paradigm based on semantic integration. We coded the frequencies with which participants falsely recalled the word “thought” as “knew” (or a near synonym), yielding an implicit measure of conceptual activation. Our experiments (...)
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  6. added 2015-03-24
    Larisa Heiphetz, Jonathan D. Lane, Adam Waytz & Liane L. Young (2015). How Children and Adults Represent God's Mind. Cognitive Science 39 (2):n/a-n/a.
    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of religious cognition. First, we show that although adults explicitly discriminate supernatural minds from human minds, their implicit responses reveal far less discrimination. Next, we demonstrate that children's religious cognition often matches adults' implicit (...)
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  7. added 2015-03-24
    Teresa Marques (2015). Disagreeing in Context. Frontiers in Psychology 6 (257):1-12.
    This paper argues for contextualism about predicates of personal taste and evaluative predicates in general, and offers a proposal of how apparently resilient disagreements are to be explained. The present proposal is complementary to others that have been made in the recent literature. Several authors, for instance (López de Sa, 2008; Sundell, 2011; Huvenes, 2012; Marques and García-Carpintero, 2014; Marques, 2014a), have recently defended semantic contextualism for those kinds of predicates from the accusation that it faces the problem of lost (...)
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  8. added 2015-03-24
    Zachary Horne, Derek Powell & John Hummel (2015). A Single Counterexample Leads to Moral Belief Revision. Cognitive Science 39 (2):n/a-n/a.
    What kind of evidence will lead people to revise their moral beliefs? Moral beliefs are often strongly held convictions, and existing research has shown that morality is rooted in emotion and socialization rather than deliberative reasoning. In addition, more general issues—such as confirmation bias—further impede coherent belief revision. Here, we explored a unique means for inducing belief revision. In two experiments, participants considered a moral dilemma in which an overwhelming majority of people judged that it was inappropriate to take action (...)
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  9. added 2015-03-24
    Samuel J. Gershman & Yael Niv (2015). Novelty and Inductive Generalization in Human Reinforcement Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):n/a-n/a.
    In reinforcement learning , a decision maker searching for the most rewarding option is often faced with the question: What is the value of an option that has never been tried before? One way to frame this question is as an inductive problem: How can I generalize my previous experience with one set of options to a novel option? We show how hierarchical Bayesian inference can be used to solve this problem, and we describe an equivalence between the Bayesian model (...)
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  10. added 2015-03-23
    Anne E. Riggs, Martha W. Alibali & Charles W. Kalish (2015). Leave Her Out of It: Person‐Presentation of Strategies Is Harmful for Transfer. Cognitive Science 39 (2).
    A common practice in textbooks is to introduce concepts or strategies in association with specific people. This practice aligns with research suggesting that using “real-world” contexts in textbooks increases students’ motivation and engagement. However, other research suggests this practice may interfere with transfer by distracting students or leading them to tie new knowledge too closely to the original learning context. The current study investigates the effects on learning and transfer of connecting mathematics strategies to specific people. A total of 180 (...)
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  11. added 2015-03-22
    Peng Zhou, Stephen Crain & Likan Zhan (2014). Grammatical Aspect and Event Recognition in Children’s Online Sentence Comprehension. Cognition 133 (1):262-276.
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  12. added 2015-03-22
    Konika Banerjee & Paul Bloom (2014). Why Did This Happen to Me? Religious Believers’ and Non-Believers’ Teleological Reasoning About Life Events. Cognition 133 (1):277-303.
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  13. added 2015-03-22
    William S. Bush & Shaun P. Vecera (2014). Differential Effect of One Versus Two Hands on Visual Processing. Cognition 133 (1):232-237.
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  14. added 2015-03-22
    Holly S. S. L. Joseph, Elizabeth Wonnacott, Paul Forbes & Kate Nation (2014). Becoming a Written Word: Eye Movements Reveal Order of Acquisition Effects Following Incidental Exposure to New Words During Silent Reading. Cognition 133 (1):238-248.
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  15. added 2015-03-22
    Maria Staudte, Matthew W. Crocker, Alexis Heloir & Michael Kipp (2014). The Influence of Speaker Gaze on Listener Comprehension: Contrasting Visual Versus Intentional Accounts. Cognition 133 (1):317-328.
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  16. added 2015-03-22
    Lauriane Rat-Fischer, J. Kevin O’Regan & Jacqueline Fagard (2014). Comparison of Active and Purely Visual Performance in a Multiple-String Means-End Task in Infants. Cognition 133 (1):304-316.
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  17. added 2015-03-21
    Richard Brown (2014). Consciousness Doesn't Overflow Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 5 (1399):10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01399.
  18. added 2015-03-20
    Juemin Xu & Nigel Harvey (forthcoming). Carry on Winning: No Selection Effect. Cognition.
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  19. added 2015-03-20
    Nadja Althaus & Kim Plunkett (2015). Timing Matters: The Impact of Label Synchrony on Infant Categorisation. Cognition 139:1-9.
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  20. added 2015-03-20
    Holly S. S. L. Joseph, Elizabeth Wonnacott, Paul Forbes & Kate Nation (2015). Corrigendum to “Becoming a Written Word: Eye Movements Reveal Order of Acquisition Effects Following Incidental Exposure to New Words During Silent Reading” [Cognition 133/1 238–248]. [REVIEW] Cognition 134:257.
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  21. added 2015-03-20
    Angelo Turri & John Turri (2015). The Truth About Lying. Cognition 138:161-168.
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  22. added 2015-03-20
    Antonia Thelen, Durk Talsma & Micah M. Murray (2015). Single-Trial Multisensory Memories Affect Later Auditory and Visual Object Discrimination. Cognition 138:148-160.
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  23. added 2015-03-20
    Helene Intraub, Frank Morelli & Kristin M. Gagnier (2015). Visual, Haptic and Bimodal Scene Perception: Evidence for a Unitary Representation. Cognition 138:132-147.
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  24. added 2015-03-20
    Tamar Kushnir, Alison Gopnik, Nadia Chernyak, Elizabeth Seiver & Henry M. Wellman (2015). Developing Intuitions About Free Will Between Ages Four and Six. Cognition 138:79-101.
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  25. added 2015-03-20
    Darko Odic, Mathieu Le Corre & Justin Halberda (2015). Children’s Mappings Between Number Words and the Approximate Number System. Cognition 138:102-121.
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  26. added 2015-03-20
    N. Karsh & B. Eitam (2015). I Control Therefore I Do: Judgments of Agency Influence Action Selection. Cognition 138:122-131.
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  27. added 2015-03-20
    Douglas B. Markant, Burr Settles & Todd M. Gureckis (2015). Self‐Directed Learning Favors Local, Rather Than Global, Uncertainty. Cognitive Science 39 (2).
    Collecting information that one expects to be useful is a powerful way to facilitate learning. However, relatively little is known about how people decide which information is worth sampling over the course of learning. We describe several alternative models of how people might decide to collect a piece of information inspired by “active learning” research in machine learning. We additionally provide a theoretical analysis demonstrating the situations under which these models are empirically distinguishable, and we report a novel empirical study (...)
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  28. added 2015-03-20
    Michael C. Frank & Joshua B. Tenenbaum (2014). Corrigendum to “Three Ideal Observer Models for Rule Learning in Simple Languages” [Cognition 120 360–371]. Cognition 132 (3):501.
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  29. added 2015-03-20
    Kurt Gray (2014). Harm Concerns Predict Moral Judgments of Suicide: Comment on Rottman, Kelemen and Young. Cognition 133 (1):329-331.
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  30. added 2015-03-20
    Marc H. Bornstein & Gianluca Esposito (2014). Beyond Cry and Laugh: Toward a Multilevel Model of Language Production. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (6):548-549.
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  31. added 2015-03-20
    Daniela Lenti Boero (2014). Early Human Communication Helps in Understanding Language Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (6):560-561.
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  32. added 2015-03-20
    Gerhard Schurz & Paul D. Thorn (2014). TTB Vs. Franklin's Rule in Environments of Different Redundancy. Frontiers in Psychology 5 (625):15-16.
    This addendum presents results that confound some commonly made claims about the sorts of environments in which the performance of TTB exceeds that of Franklin's rule, and vice versa.
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  33. added 2015-03-19
    Mehmet K. Mahmut & Richard J. Stevenson (2015). Failure to Obtain Reinstatement of an Olfactory Representation. Cognitive Science 39 (2):n/a-n/a.
    It has long been suspected that attentional processes differ between olfaction and the other senses. Here, we test whether voluntary dishabituation, seen, for example, when we re-attend to the ticking of a clock, can occur in olfaction. Participants were seated in an odorized room, where at various intervals they had to evaluate what they could smell. An experimental group had one nostril open and the other closed, except during the evaluations, so that the closed side was subject to centrally driven (...)
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  34. added 2015-03-18
    Kazuki Sekine, Hannah Sowden & Sotaro Kita (2015). The Development of the Ability to Semantically Integrate Information in Speech and Iconic Gesture in Comprehension. Cognitive Science 39 (2).
    We examined whether children's ability to integrate speech and gesture follows the pattern of a broader developmental shift between 3- and 5-year-old children regarding the ability to process two pieces of information simultaneously. In Experiment 1, 3-year-olds, 5-year-olds, and adults were presented with either an iconic gesture or a spoken sentence or a combination of the two on a computer screen, and they were instructed to select a photograph that best matched the message. The 3-year-olds did not integrate information in (...)
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  35. added 2015-03-16
    Stuart F. White, Abigail A. Marsh, Katherine A. Fowler, Julia C. Schechter, Christopher Adalio, Kayla Pope, Stephen Sinclair, Daniel S. Pine & R. James R. Blair (2012). Reduced Amygdala Response in Youths With Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Psychopathic Traits: Decreased Emotional Response Versus Increased Top-Down Attention to Nonemotional Features. American Journal of Psychiatry 169 (7):750 - 758.
    Youths with disruptive behavior disorders and psychopathic traits showed reduced amygdala responses to fearful expressions under low attentional load but no indications of increased recruitment of regions implicated in top- down attentional control. These findings suggest that the emotional deficit observed in youths with disruptive behavior disorders and psychopathic traits is primary and not secondary to increased top- down attention to nonemotional stimulus features.
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  36. added 2015-03-16
    D. G. V. Mitchell, E. Colledge & R. J. R. Blair (2002). Risky Decisions and Response Reversal: Is There Evidence of Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Psychopathic Individuals? Neuropsychologia 40:2013–2022.
    This study investigates the performance of psychopathic individuals on tasks believed to be sensitive to dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) functioning. Psychopathic and non-psychopathic individuals, as defined by the Hare psychopathy checklist revised (PCL-R) [Hare, The Hare psychopathy checklist revised, Toronto, Ontario: Multi-Health Systems, 1991] completed a gambling task [Cognition 50 (1994) 7] and the intradimensional/extradimensional (ID/ED) shift task [Nature 380 (1996) 69]. On the gambling task, psychopathic participants showed a global tendency to choose disadvantageously. Specifically, they showed an (...)
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  37. added 2015-03-16
    R. J. R. Blair, E. Colledge & D. G. V. Mitchell (2001). Somatic Markers and Response Reversal: Is There Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Boys With Psychopathic Tendencies? Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 29 (6):499-511.
    This study investigated the performance of boys with psychopathic tendencies and comparison boys, aged 9 to 17 years, on two tasks believed to be sensitive to amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex func- tioning. Fifty-one boys were divided into two groups according to the Psychopathy Screening Device (PSD, P. J. Frick & R. D. Hare, in press) and presented with two tasks. The tasks were the gambling task (A. Bechara, A. R. Damasio, H. Damasio, & S. W. Anderson, 1994) and the Intradimensional/ (...)
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  38. added 2015-03-15
    Barton L. Anderson (2015). Can Computational Goals Inform Theories of Vision? Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):n/a-n/a.
    One of the most lasting contributions of Marr's posthumous book is his articulation of the different “levels of analysis” that are needed to understand vision. Although a variety of work has examined how these different levels are related, there is comparatively little examination of the assumptions on which his proposed levels rest, or the plausibility of the approach Marr articulated given those assumptions. Marr placed particular significance on computational level theory, which specifies the “goal” of a computation, its appropriateness for (...)
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  39. added 2015-03-15
    John Bickle (2015). Marr and Reductionism. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):n/a-n/a.
    David Marr's three-level method for completely understanding a cognitive system and the importance he attaches to the computational level are so familiar as to scarcely need repeating. Fewer seem to recognize that Marr defends his famous method by criticizing the “reductionistic approach.” This sets up a more interesting relationship between Marr and reductionism than is usually acknowledged. I argue that Marr was correct in his criticism of the reductionists of his time—they were only describing , not explaining . But a (...)
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  40. added 2015-03-10
    David Peebles & Richard P. Cooper (2015). Thirty Years After Marr's Vision: Levels of Analysis in Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1).
    Thirty years after the publication of Marr's seminal book Vision the papers in this topic consider the contemporary status of his influential conception of three distinct levels of analysis for information-processing systems, and in particular the role of the algorithmic and representational level with its cognitive-level concepts. This level has been downplayed or eliminated both by reductionist neuroscience approaches from below that seek to account for behavior from the implementation level and by Bayesian approaches from above that seek to account (...)
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  41. added 2015-03-10
    Larissa K. Samuelson, Gavin W. Jenkins & John P. Spencer (2015). Grounding Cognitive‐Level Processes in Behavior: The View From Dynamic Systems Theory. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1).
    Marr's seminal work laid out a program of research by specifying key questions for cognitive science at different levels of analysis. Because dynamic systems theory focuses on time and interdependence of components, DST research programs come to very different conclusions regarding the nature of cognitive change. We review a specific DST approach to cognitive-level processes: dynamic field theory . We review research applying DFT to several cognitive-level processes: object permanence, naming hierarchical categories, and inferring intent, that demonstrate the difference in (...)
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  42. added 2015-03-06
    Chris Eliasmith & Carter Kolbeck (2015). Marr's Attacks: On Reductionism and Vagueness. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1).
    It has been suggested that Marr took the three levels he famously identifies to be independent. In this paper, we argue that Marr's view is more nuanced. Specifically, we show that the view explicitly articulated in his work attempts to integrate the levels, and in doing so results in Marr attacking both reductionism and vagueness. The result is a perspective in which both high-level information-processing constraints and low-level implementational constraints play mutually reinforcing and constraining roles. We discuss our recent work (...)
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  43. added 2015-03-01
    Richard P. Cooper & David Peebles (2015). Beyond Single‐Level Accounts: The Role of Cognitive Architectures in Cognitive Scientific Explanation. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):n/a-n/a.
    We consider approaches to explanation within the cognitive sciences that begin with Marr's computational level or Marr's implementational level and argue that each is subject to fundamental limitations which impair their ability to provide adequate explanations of cognitive phenomena. For this reason, it is argued, explanation cannot proceed at either level without tight coupling to the algorithmic and representation level. Even at this level, however, we argue that additional constraints relating to the decomposition of the cognitive system into a set (...)
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  44. added 2015-03-01
    Brock Ferguson, Danielle R. Perszyk & Sandra R. Waxman (2014). Very Young Infants' Responses to Human and Nonhuman Primate Vocalizations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (6):553-554.
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  45. added 2015-02-21
    Rixin Tang, Robert L. Whitwell & Melvyn A. Goodale (2015). The Influence of Visual Feedback From the Recent Past on the Programming of Grip Aperture is Grasp-Specific, Shared Between Hands, and Mediated by Sensorimotor Memory Not Task Set. Cognition 138:49-63.
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  46. added 2015-02-21
    Erica H. Wojcik & Jenny R. Saffran (2015). Toddlers Encode Similarities Among Novel Words From Meaningful Sentences. Cognition 138:10-20.
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  47. added 2015-02-21
    S. A. Verschoor, M. Paulus, M. Spapé, S. Biro & B. Hommel (2015). The Developing Cognitive Substrate of Sequential Action Control in 9- to 12-Month-Olds: Evidence for Concurrent Activation Models. [REVIEW] Cognition 138:64-78.
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  48. added 2015-02-21
    Laura E. Garvin & Amanda L. Woodward (2015). Verbal Framing of Statistical Evidence Drives Children’s Preference Inferences. Cognition 138:35-48.
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  49. added 2015-02-21
    Philip Millroth & Peter Juslin (2015). Prospect Evaluation as a Function of Numeracy and Probability Denominator. Cognition 138:1-9.
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  50. added 2015-02-21
    Elisabeth E. F. Bradford, Ines Jentzsch & Juan-Carlos Gomez (2015). From Self to Social Cognition: Theory of Mind Mechanisms and Their Relation to Executive Functioning. Cognition 138:21-34.
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