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  1. Juan Miguel Aguado (2009). Self-Observation, Self-Reference and Operational Coupling in Social Systems: Steps Towards a Coherent Epistemology of Mass Media. Empedocles 1 (1):59-74.
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  2. Scott F. Aikin, Poe's Law, Group Polarization, and the Epistemology of Online Religious Discourse.
    Poe's Law is roughly that online parodies of religious extremism are indistinguishable from instances of sincere extremism. Poe's Law may be expressed in a variety of ways, each highlighting either a facet of indirect discourse generally, attitudes of online audiences, or the quality of online religious material. As a consequence of the polarization of online discussions, invocations of Poe's Law have relevance in wider circles than religion. Further, regular invocations of Poe's Law in critical discussions have the threat of further (...)
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  3. Badreya Al-Jenaibi (2011). The Scope and Impact of Workplace Diversity in the United Arab Emirates – An Initial Study. Journal for Communication and Culture 1 (2):49-81.
    Managing workplace diversity has become a priority concern among organizations in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) today. The UAE has one of the world’s largest net migration rates, and the number of workers from India, the Philippines, Indonesia, Australia, the USA, among other countries, has increased significantly in recent decades. The UAE’s cross-border mobility has resulted in the interaction of people with diverse language, customs and ethnic backgrounds. Although diversity has been shown to have a number of benefits, including enhanced (...)
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  4. J. McKenzie Alexander (2014). Learning to Signal in a Dynamic World. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (4):797-820.
    Sender–receiver games, first introduced by David Lewis ([1969]), have received increased attention in recent years as a formal model for the emergence of communication. Skyrms ([2010]) showed that simple models of reinforcement learning often succeed in forming efficient, albeit not necessarily minimal, signalling systems for a large family of games. Later, Alexander et al. ([2012]) showed that reinforcement learning, combined with forgetting, frequently produced both efficient and minimal signalling systems. In this article, I define a ‘dynamic’ sender–receiver game in which (...)
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  5. João Emiliano Fortaleza Aquindeo (2007). Espetáculo, comunicação e comunismo em Guy Debord. Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 48 (115):167-182.
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  6. João Emiliano Fortaleza de Aquino (2007). Espetáculo, comunicação e comunismo em Guy Debord. Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 48 (115):167-182.
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  7. Peter Baumann (1996). Davidson on Sharing a Language and Correct Language-Use. Grazer Philosophische Studien 52:137-160.
    Donald Davidson has argued against a thesis that is widely shared in the philosophy of language, e.g., by Wittgenstein, Dummett and Kripke: the thesis that successful communication requires that speaker and hearer share a common language. Davidson's arguments, however, are not convincing. Moreover, Davidson's own positive account of communication poses a serious problem: it cannot offer criteria for the correct use of a language, especially in the case of a language that only one speaker speaks. Even though Davidson's own position (...)
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  8. David E. Beard (2009). From Work to Text to Document. Archival Science 8 (3):217-226.
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  9. David E. Beard (2009). “A Broader Understanding of the Ethics of Listening: Philosophy, Cultural Studies, Media Studies and the Ethical Listening Subject.”. International Journal of Listening 23 (1):7-20.
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  10. David E. Beard (2008). “Out of the Aerie Realm of the Intellectual Firmament.”. Quarterly Journal of Speech 93 (3):349-351.
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  11. David E. Beard (2000). “Rhetorical Criticism, Holocaust Studies, and the Problem of Ethos” (A Reply to “Ethos, Witness, and Holocaust ‘Testimony’”]. JAC 20 20:949-956.
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  12. David E. Beard & Joshue Gunn (2002). Paul Virilio and the Mediation of Perception and Technology. Enculturation 4 (2).
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  13. Jörg Bernardy (2011). Attention as Bounded Resource and Medium in Cultural Memory: A Phenomenological or Economic Approach? Empedocles 2 (2):241-254.
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  14. Matteo Bianchin (2015). From Joint Attention to Communicative Action Some Remarks on Critical Theory, Social Ontology and Cognitive Science. Philosophy and Social Criticism 41 (6):593-608.
    In this article I consider the relevance of Tomasello’s work on social cognition to the theory of communicative action. I argue that some revisions are needed to cope with Tomasello’s results, but they do not affect the core of the theory. Moreover, they arguably reinforce both its explanatory power and the plausibility of its normative claims. I proceed in three steps. First, I compare and contrast Tomasello’s views on the ontogeny of human social cognition with the main tenets of Habermas’ (...)
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  15. Vincent Blok (2009). Communication or Confrontation – Heidegger and Philosophical Method. Empedocles 1 (1):43-57.
  16. Vivian Bohl & Alan P. Fiske (2014-02). In and Out of Each Other's Bodies: Theory of Mind, Evolution, Truth, and the Nature of the Social. Maurice Bloch. Boulder, CO: Paradigm, 2012. 161 Pp. [REVIEW] American Ethnologist 41 (1):214-215.
  17. Dominique Bouchet (2010). The Paradox of Culture. Empedocles 1 (2):203-213.
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  18. Raymond Trevor Bradley (2000). Agency and the Theory of Quantum Vacuum Interaction. World Futures 55 (3):227-275.
  19. Lajos L. Brons (2014). Needing the Other: The Anatomy of the Mass Noun Thesis. ARGUMENT 4 (1):103-122.
    Othering is the construction and identification of the self or in-group and the other or out-group in mutual, unequal opposition by attributing relative inferiority and/or radical alienness to the other/out-group. Othering can be “crude” or “sophisticated”, the defining difference being that in the latter case othering depends on the interpretation of the other/out-group in terms that are applicable only to the self/in-group but that are unconsciously assumed to be universal. The Mass Noun Thesis, the idea that all nouns in certain (...)
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  20. Daniel H. Cabrera (2009). The Soul of theGolem. Empedocles 1 (1):107-121.
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  21. Paolo Carpignano (1999). The Shape of the Sphere: The Public Sphere and the Materiality of Communication. Constellations 6 (2):177-189.
  22. L. S. Chikileva (2013). Role of pre-election public addresses by us first lady in presidential image making and influencing electorate. Liberal Arts in Russia 2 (1):76--86.
    The article deals with the role of public addresses delivered by the US first lady Michelle Obama in forming the presidential image. Special attention is paid to communicative strategies, stylistic and lexico-grammatical means used in public addresses for influencing the electorate. It is shown that both Obama and his spouse’s speeches play an important role in the electorate consciousness manipulation in the USA.
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  23. Adrian Costache (2011). Toward a New Middle Ages? On Aurel Codoban’s The Empire of Communication. [REVIEW] Journal for Communication and Culture 1 (2):162-166.
    Codoban, Aurel. Imperiul comunicării: corp, imagine şi relaţionare (The Empire of Communication: Body, Image and Relation). Cluj-Napoca: Idea, 2011.
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  24. Bernard P. Dauenhauer (1979). Discourse, Silence, and Tradition. Review of Metaphysics 32 (3):437 - 451.
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  25. Eduardo de La Fuente (2010). Paradoxes of Communication: The Case of Modern Classical Music. Empedocles 1 (2):237-250.
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  26. Fausto De Petra (2010). Comunità, Comunicazione, Comune: Da Georges Bataille a Jean-Luc Nancy. Deriveapprodi.
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  27. Andreas Dorschel (2013). Aesthetics of Conducting: Expression and Gesture. In Jean Paul Olive & Susanne Kogler (eds.), Expression et geste musical. L'Harmattan 65-73.
    Expression in orchestral music is a matter of conductors rather than orchestras. Why should that be so? The straightforward answer seems to be that expression is bound to the individual self. But, then, does it have to be? Collective expression of, e.g., anger, rage or protest is not at all unusual in the public domain of politics. Our intuition of conductors’ expressive primacy could be salvaged if we were to conceive of orchestras as their instruments. But that will not do. (...)
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  28. Eli Dresner (2009). Radical Interpretation, the Primacy of Communication, and the Bounds of Language. Empedocles 1 (1):123-134.
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  29. Yoni van Den Eede (2011). Technological Remembering/Forgetting: A Faustian Bargain? Empedocles 2 (2):167-180.
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  30. Per Gunnar Eeg-Tverbakk & Kjetil A. Jakobsen (2011). Space for Interference. Empedocles 2 (1):19-39.
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  31. Itir Erhart (2011). Privacy, Confidentiality and the Press. Empedocles 2 (2):157-166.
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  32. Peter A. Facione (1975). Meaning and Communication. New Scholasticism 49 (1):1-15.
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  33. Elena Fell (2011). The Fabrication of Memory in Communication. Empedocles 2 (2):227-240.
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  34. Elena Fell (2009). Beyond Bergson: The Ontology of Togetherness. Empedocles 1 (1):9-25.
  35. Thomas H. Ford (2010). Rythmus and the Critique of Political Economy. Empedocles 1 (2):215-224.
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  36. Albrecht Fritzsche (2011). The Technology of Relating to the Past and the Conditions of Memory. Empedocles 2 (2):195-206.
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  37. José Angel García Landa, Interacción Internalizada: El Desarrollo Especular Del Lenguaje y Del Orden Simbólico (Internalized Interaction: The Specular Development of Language and the Symbolic Order).
    This paper expounds a symbolic interactionist theory of consciousness as an emergent phenomenon. It relates Michael Arbib's theory of the origin of language and Erving Goffman's frame analysis, especially as it bears on our understanding of the subject and of personal experience. Reflexivity and fictional mimesis are shown to be inherent to the origin of language and to the continuing emergent creativity of human communicative action. The emergent aspect of consciousness is also dealt with from the perspective of a narrative (...)
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  38. José Angel García Landa, Tecnologías de Manipulación Del Tiempo (Technologies of Temporal Manipulation).
    This paper points out the technological continuum between information and communication technology (ICT) and narrative structuring, which is defined as the original multimedial technology of temporal manipulation. Its interdisciplinary perspective on the semiotics of temporal representation will be of interest to narratologists, communication theorists and bloggers.
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  39. Ernest Garrett, How Humor Works - A Clear Proposal For a Classic Question.
    A short, clear and complete theory that explains the origins and properties of the human humor instinct, which has been the subject of incomplete research for thousands of years. The paper's theory uses evolutionary psychology and a basic informal equation, and unites the findings of the previous theories, including explaining the logical basis behind many types of humor as well as the common sayings associated with it.
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  40. Ernest Garrett, How Humor Works, Part II - Status Loss Theory as the Logical Basis of All Forms of Humor.
    This paper takes the Status Loss Theory (introduced and explained in the first "How Humor Works" paper), and applies it to 40 real-world examples, including memes, radio and TV shows, movie and comic book tropes, song parodies, humor sayings, stand-up comedy cliches, known psychological quirks of humor, and more, to demonstrate the theory's potential to function as the first clear, complete, logical, and simple basis for defining, studying, and understanding humor in all of its forms.
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  41. Ernest Garrett, "How Humor Works" Introduction - The "Holy Grail" Humor Theory in One Page.
    This paper introduces the "Status Loss Theory of Humor," as detailed in "How Humor Works" and "How Humor Works, Part II" , in a single page. This theory has the potential to fully, clearly, and naturally explain the human humor instinct, and has made predictions that are being confirmed by other studies.
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  42. Pat J. Gehrke (2002). Turning Kant Against the Priority of Autonomy: Communication Ethics and the Duty to Community. Philosophy and Rhetoric 35 (1):1-21.
  43. Satinder P. Gill (1999). Mediation and Communication of Information in the Cultural Interface. AI and Society 13 (3):218-234.
    In man-machine communication, there is a relationship between what may be described as tacit (human) and explicit (machine) knowledge. The tacit lies in practice and the explicit in the formulation of the processes and content of this practice. However, when a human communicates with another human face to face, we may describe them as communicating aspects of the tacit and explicit dimension of their knowledge, i.e. the expression and its background of meaning for the particular situation. When this is unsuccessful (...)
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  44. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Manolo Martínez (2013). Communication and Common Interest. PLOS Computational Biology 9 (11).
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  45. Fernanda Gomes (2011). 'The Invisible Reality Show': Performative Intervention and the Production of the Contemporary Space. Empedocles 2 (2):267-278.
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  46. William Hebblewhite (2012). 'Means of Communication as Means of Production' Revisited. TripleC - Cognition, Communication, Co-Operation 10 (2):203-213.
    This paper seeks to examine the claim made by Raymond Williams that the means of communication are a means of production. While agreeing with the central claim by Williams, the paper argues that the model which Williams’ represents this claim with is insufficiently realized. By looking at the work of Marx and Althusser in relation to this claim, we suggest a new conceptual tool to actualize Williams’ claims.
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  47. Irving Louis Horowitz (2011). Technological Rabbits and Communication Turtles. Empedocles 2 (1):127-136.
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  48. Yasmin Ibrahim (2011). Domestication of Suffering: The Politics of Pity and Communion Through ICTs. Empedocles 2 (1):137-150.
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  49. Pekka Isotalus & Owen Hargie (2012). Introduction. Empedocles 3 (1):3-6.
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  50. Kjetil A. Jakobsen (2011). Observing the Media? A Post-Luhmannian Perspective on Modern and Contemporary Art. Empedocles 2 (1):41-62.
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