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  1. Sunny Auyang, How Science Comprehends Chaos.
    Behaviors of chaotic systems are unpredictable. Chaotic systems are deterministic, their evolutions being governed by dynamical equations. Are the two statements contradictory? They are not, because the theory of chaos encompasses two levels of description. On a higher level, unpredictability appears as an emergent property of systems that are predictable on a lower level. In this talk, we examine the structure of dynamical theories to see how they employ multiple descriptive levels to explain chaos, bifurcation, and other complexities of nonlinear (...)
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  2. Ali Bulent Cambel (1993). Applied Chaos Theory a Paradigm for Complexity.
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  3. Marcelo Arnold Cathalifaud & Fernando Robles (2000). Explorando Caminos Transilustrados Más Allá Del Neopositivismo. Epistemiología Para El Siglo XXI. Cinta de Moebio 7:7.
    This essay proclaims that comprehension of mechanisms which generate knowledge on reality are basically linked to comprehension of social environment. We can say that the reality of the world is autological, that generates its own logic.
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  4. A. Combs & W. Sulis (1996). Nonlinear Dynamics in Human Behavior.
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  5. A. Das & P. Das (2002). Characterization of Chaos Evident in EEG by Nonlinear Data Analysis. Complexity 7 (3).
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  6. Aldo Filomeno (2014). On the Possibility of Stable Regularities Without Fundamental Laws. Dissertation, Autonomous University of Barcelona
    This doctoral dissertation investigates the notion of physical necessity. Specifically, it studies whether it is possible to account for non-accidental regularities without the standard assumption of a pre-existent set of governing laws. Thus, it takes side with the so called deflationist accounts of laws of nature, like the humean or the antirealist. The specific aim is to complement such accounts by providing a missing explanation of the appearance of physical necessity. In order to provide an explanation, I recur to fields (...)
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  7. Axel Gelfert (2015). Between Rigor and Reality: Many-Body Models in Condensed Matter Physics. In Brigitte Falkenburg & Margaret Morrison (eds.), Why More Is Different: Philosophical Issues in Condensed Matter Physics and Complex Systems. Springer 201-226.
    The present paper focuses on a particular class of models intended to describe and explain the physical behaviour of systems that consist of a large number of interacting particles. Such many-body models are characterized by a specific Hamiltonian (energy operator) and are frequently employed in condensed matter physics in order to account for such phenomena as magnetism, superconductivity, and other phase transitions. Because of the dual role of many-body models as models of physical sys-tems (with specific physical phenomena as their (...)
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  8. John R. Gribbin (2004). Deep Simplicity Chaos, Complexity and the Emergence of Life. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  9. Stephen H. Kellert (1992). A Philosophical Evaluation of the Chaos Theory "Revolution". PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:33 - 49.
    The scientific study of chaotic dynamics, popularly known as chaos theory, has been described by several writers as a revolution in the sense of Kuhn. I provide a definition of chaos theory and offer a brief description of this field of research. I then take up the question of whether or not chaos theory should be described as "revolutionary," in light of the fact that no well-developed science of nonlinear dynamics preceded it. In some respects, chaos theory may be fruitfully (...)
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  10. Teresa Kwiatkowska (2001). Beyond Uncertainties: Some Open Questions About Chaos and Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):96-115.
    : Lately, a new language for the understanding of the complexity of life (organism, ecosystem, and social system) has been developed. Chaos, fractals, dissipative structures, self-organization, and complex adaptive systems are some of its key concepts. On this view, reality is not the deterministic structure that Newton envisaged, but rather, a partially unknown or at least unpredictable world of multiple possibilities. As the horizon of our knowledge of natural realities expands, the emergent comprehensive perspective requires a radical reconstruction of both (...)
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  11. Steve B. Lazarre (2003). Theory and Application of Chaos Theory and Family Systems Therapy: A Critical Review of the Literature. Dissertation, Alliant International University, San Diego
    This paper is an examination of change as an evolving concept progressing from early philosophies to systems theory. The purpose of the paper was to clarify the dimensions of change in the integration of family systems theory and chaos and complexity theory. The key concept in the material change is articulated from selected interdisciplinary sources in the history of ideas, from Parmenides through deep ecology, related to a current integration of family systems and chaos theory. This study examines whether modern (...)
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  12. Ma Metzger (1988). Predicting Periodic and Chaotic Phenomena of Dynamical-Systems-Insensitivity to Sample-Size. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):527-527.
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  13. Bernard Pullman & Pontificia Accademia Delle Scienze (1996). The Emergence of Complexity in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology Proceedings, Plenary Session of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, 27-31 October 1992. [REVIEW]
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  14. Michel Rosenfeld (1991). Antopoiesis and Justice a Critique of Luhmann's Conception of Law. Faculty of Law, University of Toronto.
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  15. David Jon Spurrett, Review Article Of: Cilliers, P. (1998) Complexity and Postmodernism: Understanding Complex Systems, London: Routledge.
    This is a review article of Paul Cillier's 1999 book _Complexity and Postmodernism_. The review article is generally encouraging and constructive, although isolates a number of areas in need of clarification or development in Cillier's work. The volume of the _South African Journal of Philosophy_ in which the review article appeared also printed a response by Cilliers.
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  16. B. V. Srikantan (ed.) (forthcoming). Foundations of Science. Center for Studies in Civilizations.
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  17. S. J. Stoeger (2007). Evolution and Emergence: Systems, Organisms, Persons. OUP Oxford.
    A collection of essays by experts in the field, exploring how nature works to produce systems of increasing complexity from simple components, and how our understanding of this phenomenon of emergence can lead us to a deeper appreciation of both our humanity and our relationship with God.
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  18. Johann Summhammer (2011). Quantum Cooperation. Axiomathes 21 (2):347-356.
    In a theoretical simulation the cooperation of two insects is investigated who share a large number of maximally entangled EPR-pairs to correlate their probabilistic actions. Specifically, two distant butterflies must find each other. Each butterfly moves in a chaotic form of short flights, guided only by the weak scent emanating from the other butterfly. The flight directions result from classical random choices. Each such decision of an individual is followed by a read-out of an internal quantum measurement on a spin, (...)
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  19. P. Van Geert (2009). Nonlinear Complex Dynamical Systems in Developmental Psychology. In Stephen J. Guastello, Matthijs Koopmans & David Pincus (eds.), Chaos and Complexity in Psychology: The Theory of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems. Cambridge University Press
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  20. Andreas Wagner (1999). Causality in Complex Systems. Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):83-101.
    Systems involving many interacting variables are at the heart of the natural and social sciences. Causal language is pervasive in the analysis of such systems, especially when insight into their behavior is translated into policy decisions. This is exemplified by economics, but to an increasing extent also by biology, due to the advent of sophisticated tools to identify the genetic basis of many diseases. It is argued here that a regularity notion of causality can only be meaningfully defined for systems (...)
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  21. William C. Wimsatt (1994). The Ontology of Complex Systems: Levels of Organization, Perspectives, and Causal Thickets. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (sup1):207-274.
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  22. Kazuko Yamasaki, Kaushik Matia, Fabio Pammolli, Sergey Buldyrev, Massimo Riccaboni, H. Eugene Stanley & Dongfeng Fu, Preferential Attachment and Growth Dynamics in Complex Systems.
    Complex systems can be characterized by classes of equivalency of their elements defined according to system specific rules. We propose a generalized preferential attachment model to describe the class size distribution. The model postulates preferential growth of the existing classes and the steady influx of new classes. According to the model, the distribution changes from a pure exponential form for zero influx of new classes to a power law with an exponential cut-off form when the influx of new classes is (...)
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  23. P. Ylikoski (2009). Book Review: Sawyer, R. Keith. (2005). Social Emergence: Societies as Complex Systems. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (3):527-530.
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  24. Elias Zafiris (2005). Complex Systems From the Perspective of Category Theory: I. Functioning of the Adjunction Concept. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 15 (1):147-158.
    We develop a category theoretical scheme for the comprehension of the information structure associated with a complex system, in terms of families of partial or local information carriers. The scheme is based on the existence of a categorical adjunction, that provides a theoretical platform for the descriptive analysis of the complex system as a process of functorial information communication.
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  25. Elias Zafiris (2005). Complex Systems From the Perspective of Category Theory: II. Covering Systems and Sheaves. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 15 (2):181-190.
    Using the concept of adjunction, for the comprehension of the structure of a complex system, developed in Part I, we introduce the notion of covering systems consisting of partially or locally defined adequately understood objects. This notion incorporates the necessary and sufficient conditions for a sheaf theoretical representation of the informational content included in the structure of a complex system in terms of localization systems. Furthermore, it accommodates a formulation of an invariance property of information communication concerning the analysis of (...)
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  26. Elias Zafiris (2005). Complex Systems From the Perspective of Category Theory: I. Functioning of the Adjunction Concept. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 15 (1):147-158.
    We develop a category theoretical framework for the comprehension of the information structure associated with a complex system, in terms of families of partial or local information carriers. The framework is based on the existence of a categorical adjunction, that provides a theoretical platform for the descriptive analysis of the complex system as a process of functorial information communication.
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  27. Elias Zafiris (2005). Complex Systems From the Perspective of Category Theory: II. Covering Systems and Sheaves. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 15 (2):181-190.
    Using the concept of adjunctive correspondence, for the comprehension of the structure of a complex system, developed in Part I, we introduce the notion of covering systems consisting of partially or locally defined adequately understood objects. This notion incorporates the necessary and sufficient conditions for a sheaf theoretical representation of the informational content included in the structure of a complex system in terms of localization systems. Furthermore, it accommodates a formulation of an invariance property of information communication concerning the analysis (...)
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Chaos
  1. A. Abbasi, S. H. Fathi, G. B. Gharehpatian, A. Gholami & H. R. Abbasi (2013). Voltage Transformer Ferroresonance Analysis Using Multiple Scales Method and Chaos Theory. Complexity 18 (6):34-45.
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  2. Ralph Abraham (1994). Chaos, Gaia, Eros a Chaos Pioneer Uncovers the Three Great Streams of History.
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  3. Philip Anderson & Jack Cohen (1999). Reviews: Coping with Uncertainty, Insights From the New Sciences of Chaos, Self-Organization, and Complexity, Uri Merry. [REVIEW] Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1 (2):106-108.
    (1999). Reviews: Coping with Uncertainty, Insights from the New Sciences of Chaos, Self-Organization, and Complexity, Uri Merry. Emergence: Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 106-108.
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  4. S. M. Anlage (2000). Book Review: Quantum Chaos-An Introduction. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 30 (7):1135-1138.
  5. I. Antoniou & Z. Suchanecki (1997). The Fuzzy Logic of Chaos and Probabilistic Inference. Foundations of Physics 27 (3):333-362.
    The logic of a physical system consists of the elementary observables of the system. We show that for chaotic systems the logic is not any more the classical Boolean lattice but a kind of fuzzy logic which we characterize for a class of chaotic maps. Among other interesting properties the fuzzy logic of chaos does not allow for infinite combinations of propositions. This fact reflects the instability of dynamics and it is shared also by quantum systems with diagonal singularity. We (...)
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  6. Fatihcan M. Atay, Sarika Jalan & Jürgen Jost (2009). Randomness, Chaos, and Structure. Complexity 15 (1):29-35.
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  7. Harald Atmanspacher, Characterizing Spontaneous Irregular Behavior in Coupled Map Lattices.
    Two-dimensional coupled map lattices display, in a specific parameter range, a stable phase (quasi-) periodic in both space and time. With small changes to the model parameters, this stable phase develops spontaneous eruptions of nonperiodic behavior. Although this behavior itself appears irregular, it can be characterized in a systematic fashion. In particular, parameter-independent features of the spontaneous eruptions may allow useful empirical characterizations of other phenomena that are intrinsically hard to predict and reproduce. Specific features of the distributions of lifetimes (...)
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  8. Harald Atmanspacher, Ontic and Epistemic Descriptions of Chaotic Systems.
    Traditional philosophical discourse draws a distinction between ontology and epistemology and generally enforces this distinction by keeping the two subject areas separated and unrelated. In addition, the relationship between the two areas is of central importance to physics and philosophy of physics. For instance, all kinds of measurement-related problems force us to consider both our knowledge of the states and observables of a system (epistemic perspective) and its states and observables independent of such knowledge (ontic perspective). This applies to quantum (...)
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  9. R. Badii (1997). Complexity: Hierarchical Structures and Scaling in Physics. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a comprehensive discussion of complexity as it arises in physical, chemical, and biological systems, as well as in mathematical models of nature. Common features of these apparently unrelated fields are emphasised and incorporated into a uniform mathematical description, with the support of a large number of detailed examples and illustrations. The quantitative study of complexity is a rapidly developing subject with special impact in the fields of physics, mathematics, information science, and biology. Because of the variety of the (...)
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  10. Arek Bagiânski & Agnieszka Wierzchucka (1999). Chaos.
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  11. Gerold Baier (1995). A Strategy for Higher Chaos. In R. J. Russell, N. Murphy & A. R. Peacocke (eds.), Chaos and Complexity. Vatican Observatory Publications 189.
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  12. Riccardo Baldissone (2013). Chaos Beyond Order: Overcoming the Quest for Certainty and Conservation in Modern Western Sciences. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):35-49.
    Chaos theory not only stretched the concept of chaos well beyond its traditional semantic boundaries, but it also challenged fundamental tenets of physics and science in general. Hence, its present and potential impact on the Western worldview cannot be underestimated. I will illustrate the relevance of chaos theory in regard to modern Western thought by tracing the concept of order, which modern thinkers emphasised as chaos’ dichotomic counterpart. In particular, I will underline how the concern of seventeenth-century natural philosophers with (...)
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  13. Robert W. Batterman (1993). Defining Chaos. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):43-66.
    This paper considers definitions of classical dynamical chaos that focus primarily on notions of predictability and computability, sometimes called algorithmic complexity definitions of chaos. I argue that accounts of this type are seriously flawed. They focus on a likely consequence of chaos, namely, randomness in behavior which gets characterized in terms of the unpredictability or uncomputability of final given initial states. In doing so, however, they can overlook the definitive feature of dynamical chaos--the fact that the underlying motion generating the (...)
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  14. Robert W. Batterman (1991). Chaos, Quantization, and the Correspondence Principle. Synthese 89 (2):189 - 227.
  15. Robert W. Batterman & Homer White (1996). Chaos and Algorithmic Complexity. Foundations of Physics 26 (3):307-336.
    Our aim is to discover whether the notion of algorithmic orbit-complexity can serve to define “chaos” in a dynamical system. We begin with a mostly expository discussion of algorithmic complexity and certain results of Brudno, Pesin, and Ruelle (BRP theorems) which relate the degree of exponential instability of a dynamical system to the average algorithmic complexity of its orbits. When one speaks of predicting the behavior of a dynamical system, one usually has in mind one or more variables in the (...)
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  16. Roger A. Beaumont (1994). War, Chaos, and History. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  17. Christopher Belanger (2013). On Two Mathematical Definitions of Observational Equivalence: Manifest Isomorphism and Epsilon-Congruence Reconsidered. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 44 (2):69-76.
    In this article I examine two mathematical definitions of observational equivalence, one proposed by Charlotte Werndl and based on manifest isomorphism, and the other based on Ornstein and Weiss’s ε-congruence. I argue, for two related reasons, that neither can function as a purely mathematical definition of observational equivalence. First, each definition permits of counterexamples; second, overcoming these counterexamples will introduce non-mathematical premises about the systems in question. Accordingly, the prospects for a broadly applicable and purely mathematical definition of observational equivalence (...)
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  18. Gordon Belot & John Earman (1997). Chaos Out of Order: Quantum Mechanics, the Correspondence Principle and Chaos. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 28 (2):147-182.
  19. Gordon Belot & Lina Jansson (2010). Alisa Bokulich, Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation: Beyond Reductionism and Pluralism , Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (2008) ISBN 978-0-521-85720-8 Pp. X+195. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (1):81-83.
  20. Andrew Belsey (1994). Chaos and Order, Environment and Anarchy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:157-167.
    The distinction between chaos and order has been central to western philosophy, both in metaphysics and politics. At the beginning, it was intrinsic to presocratic natural philosophy, and shortly after that to the cosmology and social philosophy of Plato. Even in the pre-presocratic period there were important intimations of it. Thus Hesiod tells us that ‘first of all did Chaos come into being’ —although exactly what is meant by ‘chaos’ in this context is not clear. between earth and sky . (...)
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  21. Melvyn S. Berger (1995). Order Beyond Periodicity: Fighting Chaos for Quasiperiodic Motion of Nonlinear Hamiltonian Systems. In R. J. Russell, N. Murphy & A. R. Peacocke (eds.), Chaos and Complexity. Vatican Observatory Publications 185.
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  22. K.-F. Berggren & T. Ouchterlony (2001). Chaos in a Quantum Dot with Spin-Orbit Coupling. Foundations of Physics 31 (2):233-242.
    Level statistics and nodal point distribution in a rectangular semiconductor quantum dot are studied for different degrees of spin-orbit coupling. The chaotic features occurring from the spin-orbit coupling have no classical counterpart. Using experimental values for GaSb/InAs/GaSb semiconductor quantum wells we find that level repulsion can lead to the semi-Poisson distribution for nearest level separations. Nodal lines and nodal points are also investigated. Comparison is made with nodal point distributions for fully chaotic states.
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  23. Robert C. Bishop & Frederick M. Kronz (1999). Is Chaos Indeterministic? In Maria Luisa Dalla Chiara (ed.), Language, Quantum, Music. 129--141.
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