This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
124 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 124
  1. Christoph Adami (2002). What is Complexity? Bioessays 24 (12):1085-1094.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Richard N. Adams (2011). Energy, Complexity, and Strategies of Evolution: As Illustrated by Maya Indians of Guatemala. World Futures 66 (7):470-503.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kevin S. Amidon (2008). Adolf Meyer-Abich, Holism, and the Negotiation of Theoretical Biology. Biological Theory 3 (4):357-370.
  4. Sunny Auyang, Concepts of System in Engineering.
    PDF version This talk explores three concepts of system in engineering: systems theory, systems approach, and systems engineering. They are exemplified in three dimensions of engineering: science, design, and management. Unifying the three system concepts is the idea of function: functional abstraction in theory, functional analysis in design, and functional requirements in management. Signifying what a system is for, function is a purposive notion absent in physical science, which aims to understand nature. It is prominent in engineering, which aims to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Giovanni Felice Azzone (1997). Adaptation and Information in Ontogenesis and Phylogenesis. Increase of Complexity and Efficiency. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 19 (2):163 - 180.
    Adaptations during phylogenesis or ontogenesis can occur either by maintaning constant or by increasing the informational content of the organism. In the former case the increasing adaptations to external perturbation are achieved by increasing the rate of genome replication; the increased amount of DNA reflects an increase of total but not of law informational content. In the latter case the adaptations are achieved by either istructionist or evolutionary mechanism or a combination of both. Evolutionary adaptations occur during ontogenesis mainly in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Mostafa Bachar (forthcoming). Modeling the Cardiovascular-Respiratory Control System: Data, Model Analysis, and Parameter Estimation. Acta Biotheoretica.
    Several key areas in modeling the cardiovascular and respiratory control systems are reviewed and examples are given which reflect the research state of the art in these areas. Attention is given to the interrelated issues of data collection, experimental design, and model application including model development and analysis. Examples are given of current clinical problems which can be examined via modeling, and important issues related to model adaptation to the clinical setting.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. I. C. Baianu (2006). Robert Rosen's Work and Complex Systems Biology. Axiomathes 16 (1-2):25-34.
    Complex Systems Biology approaches are here considered from the viewpoint of Robert Rosen’s (M,R)-systems, Relational Biology and Quantum theory, as well as from the standpoint of computer modeling. Realizability and Entailment of (M,R)-systems are two key aspects that relate the abstract, mathematical world of organizational structure introduced by Rosen to the various physicochemical structures of complex biological systems. Their importance for understanding biological function and life itself, as well as for designing new strategies for treating diseases such as cancers, is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Michael E. Baker (2003). Evolution of Adrenal and Sex Steroid Action in Vertebrates: A Ligand‐Based Mechanism for Complexity. Bioessays 25 (4):396-400.
  9. Majid Bani-Yaghoub & David E. Amundsen (2008). Study and Simulation of Reaction–Diffusion Systems Affected by Interacting Signaling Pathways. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (4).
    Possible effects of interaction (cross-talk) between signaling pathways is studied in a system of Reaction–Diffusion (RD) equations. Furthermore, the relevance of spontaneous neurite symmetry breaking and Turing instability has been examined through numerical simulations. The interaction between Retinoic Acid (RA) and Notch signaling pathways is considered as a perturbation to RD system of axon-forming potential for N2a neuroblastoma cells. The present work suggests that large increases to the level of RA–Notch interaction can possibly have substantial impacts on neurite outgrowth and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Eric Bapteste & Richard M. Burian (2010). On the Need for Integrative Phylogenomics, and Some Steps Toward its Creation. Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):711-736.
    Recently improved understanding of evolutionary processes suggests that tree-based phylogenetic analyses of evolutionary change cannot adequately explain the divergent evolutionary histories of a great many genes and gene complexes. In particular, genetic diversity in the genomes of prokaryotes, phages, and plasmids cannot be fit into classic tree-like models of evolution. These findings entail the need for fundamental reform of our understanding of molecular evolution and the need to devise alternative apparatus for integrated analysis of these genomes. We advocate the development (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Eric Bapteste & John Dupré (2013). Towards a Processual Microbial Ontology. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):379-404.
    Standard microbial evolutionary ontology is organized according to a nested hierarchy of entities at various levels of biological organization. It typically detects and defines these entities in relation to the most stable aspects of evolutionary processes, by identifying lineages evolving by a process of vertical inheritance from an ancestral entity. However, recent advances in microbiology indicate that such an ontology has important limitations. The various dynamics detected within microbiological systems reveal that a focus on the most stable entities (or features (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Peter W. Barlow (1992). A Constant of Temporal Structure in the Human Hierarchy and Other Systems. Acta Biotheoretica 40 (4).
    The levels that compose biological hierarchies each have their own energetic, spatial and temporal structure. Indeed, it is the discontinuity in energy relationships between levels, as well as the similarity of sub-systems that support them, that permits levels to be defined. In this paper, the temporal structure of living hierarchies, in particular that pertaining to Human society, is examined. Consideration is given to the period defining the lifespan of entities at each level and to a periodic event considered fundamental to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Christian Baron (2011). A Web of Controversies: Complexity in the Burgess Shale Debate. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):745 - 780.
    Using the Burgess Shale controversies as a case-study, this paper argues that controversies within different domains may interact as to create a situation of "complicated intricacies," where the practicing scientist has to navigate through a context of multiple thought collectives. To some extent each of these collectives has its own dynamic complete with fairly negotiated standards for investigation and explanation, theoretical background assumptions and certain peculiarities of practice. But the intellectual development in one of these collectives may "spill over" having (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. William Bechtel, Werner Callebaut, James R. Griesemer & Jeffrey C. Schank (2006). Bill Wimsatt on Multiple Ways of Getting at the Complexity of Nature. Biological Theory 1 (2):213-219.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. William Bechtel, Robert C. Richardson & Scott A. Kleiner (1996). Discovering Complexity. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (3):363-382.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Hugo J. Bellen, Clive Wilson & Walter J. Gehring (1990). Dissecting the Complexity of the Nervous System by Enhancer Detection. Bioessays 12 (5):199-204.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Catherine Anne Boisvert (2013). From Cells to Structures to Evolutionary Novelties: Creating a Continuum. Biological Theory 8 (3):211-220.
    This thematic issue addresses questions of constraints on the evolution of form—physical, biological, and technical. Here, form is defined as an embodiment of a specific structure, which can be hierarchically different yet emerge from the same processes. The focus of this contribution is about how developmental biology and paleontology can be better integrated and compared in order to produce hypotheses about the evolution of form. The constraints on current EvoDevo research stem from the disconnect in the focus of study for (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ingo Brigandt (2013). Systems Biology and the Integration of Mechanistic Explanation and Mathematical Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):477-492.
    The paper discusses how systems biology is working toward complex accounts that integrate explanation in terms of mechanisms and explanation by mathematical models—which some philosophers have viewed as rival models of explanation. Systems biology is an integrative approach, and it strongly relies on mathematical modeling. Philosophical accounts of mechanisms capture integrative in the sense of multilevel and multifield explanations, yet accounts of mechanistic explanation (as the analysis of a whole in terms of its structural parts and their qualitative interactions) have (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. F. J. Bruggeman, H. V. Westerhoff & F. C. Boogerd (2002). Biocomplexity: A Pluralist Research Strategy is Necessary for a Mechanistic Explanation of the "Live" State. Philosophical Psychology 15 (4):411 – 440.
    The biological sciences study (bio)complex living systems. Research directed at the mechanistic explanation of the "live" state truly requires a pluralist research program, i.e. BioComplexity research. The program should apply multiple intra-level and inter-level theories and methodologies. We substantiate this thesis with analysis of BioComplexity: metabolic and modular control analysis of metabolic pathways, emergence of oscillations, and the analysis of the functioning of glycolysis.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Richard M. Burian (1997). Comments on Complexity and Experimentation in Biology. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):291.
    Biology deals, notoriously, with complex systems. In discussing biological methodology, all three papers in this symposium honor the complexity of biological subject matter by preferring models and theories built to reflect the details of complex systems to models based on broad general principles or laws. Rheinberger's paper, the most programmatic of the three, provides a framework for the epistemology of discovery in complex systems. A fundamental problem is raised for Rheinberger's epistemology, namely, how to understand the referential continuity of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Werner Callebaut & Manfred D. Laubichler (2007). Biocomplexity as a Challenge for Biological Theory. Biological Theory 2 (1):1-2.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Georges Chapouthier (2008). Complexity in Living Organisms. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:17-22.
    The present thesis, compatible with Darwinian theory, endeavours to provide original answers to the question of why the evolution of species leads to beings more complex than those existing before. It is based on the repetition of two main principles alleged to play a role in evolution towards complexity, i.e. "juxtaposition" and "integration". Juxtaposition is the addition of identical entities. Integration is the modification, or specialisation, of these entities, leading to entities on a higher level, which use the previous entities (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Tom Cheetham (1993). The Forms of Life: Complexity, History, and Actuality. Environmental Ethics 15 (4):293-311.
    A fundamental misapprehension of the nature of our being in the world underlies the general inhumanity and incoherence of modern culture. The belief that abstraction as a mode of knowing can be universalized to provide a rational ground for all human knowledge and action is a pernicious and unacknowledged background to several modern diseases. Illustrative of these maladies is the seeming dichotomy between the aesthetic and the analytic approaches to nature. One critical arena in which the incoherences of our current (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. F. Collot (1995). Correlations Entre Complexification Et Instabilite Dans Une Formalisation du Concept de Complexite. Acta Biotheoretica 43 (1-2).
    Scientists have attempted several times to define the notion of complexity. A proper definition uses elements of three sets: a set of sites, as set of connections, and a set of nodes coincides with the set. Sites and connections can be translated into terms of graph theory as vertices and edges, which enables to consider complexity as an associated graph.Thus complexity of a system (or a structure) will be defined as the number of possible figures and aspects which are obtained (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Patrizia D'Ettorre (2008). Multiple Levels of Recognition in Ants: A Feature of Complex Societies. Biological Theory 3 (2):108-113.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Lindley Darden (1996). Discovering Complexity. Biology and Philosophy 12 (1):101-107.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Brian K. Davis (2004). Expansion of the Genetic Code in Yeast: Making Life More Complex. Bioessays 26 (2):111-115.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Sandro J. de Souza (2012). Domain Shuffling and the Increasing Complexity of Biological Networks. Bioessays 34 (8):655-657.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Alain de Wailly (1998). The Ambiguity of the Word "Complexity" a Proposal for Clarification. Acta Biotheoretica 46 (3).
    There are two different ways of defining complexity.1) Traditionally, the word "complexity" is considered synonymous to "organization". The transformation of species is an expression of victory against random indifferencism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael A. B. Deakin (1990). Catastrophe Modelling in the Biological Sciences. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (1).
    Catastrophe Theory was developed in an attempt to provide a form of Mathematics particularly apt for applications in the biological sciences. It was claimed that while it could be applied in the more conventional physical way, it could also be applied in a new metaphysical way, derived from the Structuralism of Saussure in Linguistics and Lévi-Strauss in Anthropology.Since those early beginnings there have been many attempts to apply Catastrophe Theory to Biology, but these hopes cannot be said to have been (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. William Dembski, No Free Lunch: Why Specified Complexity Cannot Be Purchased Without Intelligence.
    Darwin's greatest accomplishment was to show how life might be explained as the result of natural selection. But does Darwin's theory mean that life was unintended? William A. Dembski argues that it does not. In this book Dembski extends his theory of intelligent design. Building on his earlier work in The Design Inference (Cambridge, 1998), he defends that life must be the product of intelligent design. Critics of Dembski's work have argued that evolutionary algorithms show that life can be explained (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. W. Ford Doolittle, Julius Lukeš, John M. Archibald, Patrick J. Keeling & Michael W. Gray (2011). Comment on “Does Constructive Neutral Evolution Play an Important Role in the Origin of Cellular Complexity?” DOI 10.1002/Bies. 201100010. [REVIEW] Bioessays 33 (6):427-429.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Claus Emmeche (1997). Aspects of Complexity in Life and Science. Philosophica 59.
    A short review of complexity research from the perspective of history and philosophy of biology is presented. Complexity and its emergence has scientific and metaphysical meanings. From its beginning, biology was a science of complex systems, but with the advent of electronic computing and the possibility of simulating mathematical models of complicated systems, new intuitions of complexity emerged, together with attempts to devise quantitative measures of complexity. But can we quantify the complex?
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Péter Érdi (2003). Complexity Underestimated? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):676-677.
    Instead of commenting directly on Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution, I provide some remarks from an interdisciplinary view. Language theory is examined from the perspective of the theory of complex systems. The gestural-vocal dichotomy, network theory, evolutionary mechanisms/algorithms, chaos theory, and constructive approach are briefly mentioned.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Arantza Etxeberria & Jon Umerez (2009). Biological Organization and the Role of Theoretical Biology : Function and Autonomy. In González Recio & José Luis (eds.), Philosophical Essays on Physics and Biology. G. Olms.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Patrick Forber (2005). Grounding the Big Picture. Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):913-923.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Adrian Friday (1990). The Elaboration of Complexity in Vertebrate evolutionComplex Organismal Functions: Integration and Evolution in Vertebrates (1989). Report of the Dahlem Workshop on Complex Organismal Functions: Integration and Evolution in Vertebrates, Berlin 1988, August 28-September 2. Editors: D. B. Wake and G. Roth. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester. Pp. 451. �57.50, $105.80. [REVIEW] Bioessays 12 (7):353-353.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jürgen Gadau & Manfred D. Laubichler (2006). Relatedness: Capturing Cohesion in Biological Systems. Biological Theory 1 (4):414-417.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Philippe Gagnon (2013). An Improbable God Between Simplicity and Complexity: Thinking About Dawkins's Challenge. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):409-433.
    Richard Dawkins has popularized an argument that he thinks sound for showing that there is almost certainly no God. It rests on the assumptions (1) that complex and statistically improbable things are more difficult to explain than those that are not and (2) that an explanatory mechanism must show how this complexity can be built up from simpler means. But what justifies claims about the designer’s own complexity? One comes to a different understanding of order and of simplicity when one (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Andy Gardner (2013). Ultimate Explanations Concern the Adaptive Rationale for Organism Design. Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):787-791.
    My understanding is that proximate explanations concern adaptive mechanism and that ultimate explanations concern adaptive rationale. Viewed in this light, the two kinds of explanation are quite distinct, but they interact in a complementary way to give a full understanding of biological adaptations. In contrast, Laland et al. (2013)—following a literal reading of Mayr (Science 134:1501–1506, 1961)—have characterized ultimate explanations as concerning any and all mechanisms that have operated over the course of an organism’s evolutionary history. This has unfortunate consequences, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Johan Grasman, B. Theunissen, E. Otten & J. A. M. Gisbergen (1987). Reviews. [REVIEW] Acta Biotheoretica 36 (1).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Bo Hang (2004). Repair of Exocyclic DNA Adducts: Rings of Complexity. Bioessays 26 (11):1195-1208.
  43. Juan Carlos Herranz (2009). Dissection and Scientific Reasoning : From Their Origins Toward a Biology of Complexity. In González Recio & José Luis (eds.), Philosophical Essays on Physics and Biology. G. Olms.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Bruce E. Hesse & Gary Novak (2001). On the Origins of Complexity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):540-541.
    Darwin's theory of natural selection is as applicable to the analysis of the behavior of organisms as it is to their origins. Skinner's theoretical writings have guided operant psychologists in this area. The behavioral account of selection by Donahoe and Palmer (1994) is positively compared to the points on operant selection made by Hull et al. The “general account of selection” was found to be useful.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Geoffrey M. Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen (2008). Information, Complexity and Generative Replication. Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):47-65.
    The established definition of replication in terms of the conditions of causality, similarity and information transfer is very broad. We draw inspiration from the literature on self-reproducing automata to strengthen the notion of information transfer in replication processes. To the triple conditions of causality, similarity and information transfer, we add a fourth condition that defines a “generative replicator” as a conditional generative mechanism, which can turn input signals from an environment into developmental (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Brian Johnson (2010). Eliminating the Mystery From the Concept of Emergence. Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):843-849.
    While some branches of complexity theory are advancing rapidly, the same cannot be said for our understanding of emergence. Despite a complete knowledge of the rules underlying the interactions between the parts of many systems, we are often baffled by their sudden transitions from simple to complex. Here I propose a solution to this conceptual problem. Given that emergence is often the result of many interactions occurring simultaneously in time and space, an ability to intuitively grasp it would require the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Herman J. Jordan (1935). Das Problem der „Ganzheit” in der Biologie. Acta Biotheoretica 1 (1-2).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Marie I. Kaiser (2011). The Limits of Reductionism in the Life Sciences. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (4):453-476.
    In the contemporary life sciences more and more researchers emphasize the “limits of reductionism” (e.g. Ahn et al. 2006a, 709; Mazzocchi 2008, 10) or they call for a move “beyond reductionism” (Gallagher/Appenzeller 1999, 79). However, it is far from clear what exactly they argue for and what the envisioned limits of reductionism are. In this paper I claim that the current discussions about reductionism in the life sciences, which focus on methodological and explanatory issues, leave the concepts of a reductive (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Stuart A. Kauffman (1990). The Sciences of Complexity and "Origins of Order". PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:299 - 322.
    This article discusses my book, Origins of Order: Self Organization and Selection in Evolution, in the context of the emerging sciences of complexity. Origins, due out of Oxford University Press in early 1992, attempts to lay out a broadened theory of evolution based on the marriage of unexpected and powerful properties of self organization which arises in complex systems, properties which may underlie the origin of life itself and the emergence of order in ontogeny, and the continuing action of natural (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Stuart Kauffman & Philip Clayton (2006). On Emergence, Agency, and Organization. Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):501-521.
    Ultimately we will only understand biological agency when we have developed a theory of the organization of biological processes, and science is still a long way from attaining that goal. It may be possible nonetheless to develop a list of necessary conditions for the emergence of minimal biological agency. The authors offer a model of molecular autonomous agents which meets the five minimal physical conditions that are necessary (and, we believe, conjointly sufficient) for applying agential language in biology: autocatalytic reproduction; (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 124