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  1. Susan Ackerman (2010). Otherworldly Music and the Other Sex. In John J. Collins & Daniel C. Harlow (eds.), The "Other" in Second Temple Judaism: Essays in Honor of John J. Collins. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
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  2. Linda Alcoff (2008). Gender and Reproduction. Asian Journal of Women's Studies 14 (4):7-27.
    This paper provides a materialist approach to defining gender identity.
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  3. Linda Martín Alcoff (2006). Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self. OUP USA.
    In the heated debates over identity politics, few theorists have looked carefully at the conceptualizations of identity assumed by all sides. Visible Identities fills this gap. Drawing on both philosophical sources as well as theories and empirical studies in the social sciences, Martín Alcoff makes a strong case that identities are not like special interests, nor are they doomed to oppositional politics, nor do they inevitably lead to conformism, essentialism, or reductive approaches to judging others. Identities are historical formations and (...)
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  4. Cathryn Bailey (2009). Embracing the Icon: The Feminist Potential of the Trans Bodhisattva, Kuan Yin. Hypatia 24 (3):178 - 196.
    I explore how the Buddhist icon Kuan Yin is emerging as a point of identification for trans people and has the potential to resolve a tension within feminism. As a figure that slips past the male/female binary, Kuan Yin explodes the dichotomy between universal and particular in a way that captures the pragmatist and feminist emphasis on doing justice to concrete, particular lives without becoming stuck in an essentialist quagmire.
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  5. Debra Bergoffen & Gail Weiss (2012). Cluster: Contesting the Norms of Embodiment — Editors' Introduction. Hypatia 27 (2):241-242.
  6. Roberta Bivins (2000). Sex Cells: Gender and the Language of Bacterial Genetics. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):113 - 139.
    Between 1946 and 1960, a new phenomenon emerged in the field of bacteriology. "Bacterial sex," as it was called, revolutionized the study of genetics, largely by making available a whole new class of cheap, fast-growing, and easily manipulated organisms. But what was "bacterial sex?" How could single-celled organisms have "sex" or even be sexually differentiated? The technical language used in the scientific press -- the public and inalienable face of 20th century science -- to describe this apparently neuter organism was (...)
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  7. Robyn Bluhm (2013). Self‐Fulfilling Prophecies: The Influence of Gender Stereotypes on Functional Neuroimaging Research on Emotion. Hypatia 28 (4):870-886.
    Feminist scholars have shown that research on sex/gender differences in the brain is often used to support gender stereotypes. Scientists use a variety of methodological and interpretive strategies to make their results consistent with these stereotypes. In this paper, I analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research that examines differences between women and men in brain activity associated with emotion and show that these researchers go to great lengths to make their results consistent with the view that women are more (...)
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  8. Rosi Braidotti (2002). Metamorphoses: Towards a Materialist Theory of Becoming. Published by Polity Press in Association with Blackwell Publishers.
  9. Judith Butler (1993/2011). Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of "Sex". Routledge.
    This book will be essential reading in feminism, cultural studies, philosophy and political theory.
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  10. Olio Center (1987). Mary B. Mahowald Sex-Role Stereotypes In Medicine. Hypatia 2 (2).
  11. Claire Colebrook (2004). Gender. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book offers a clear introductory overview of the concept of gender. It places gender in its historical contexts and traces its development from the Enlightenment to the present, before moving on to the evolution of the concept of gender from within the various stances of feminist criticism, and recent developments in queer theory and post-feminism. Close analysis of key literary texts, including Frankenstein , Paradise Lost and A Midsummer Night's Dream , shows how specific styles of literature enable reflection (...)
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  12. John Corvino (2000). Analyzing Gender. Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (1):173-180.
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  13. Monique David-Ménard (2003). Sexual Alterity and the Alterity of the Real for Thought. Angelaki 8 (2):137 – 150.
  14. Vasilikie P. Demos & Marcia Texler Segal (eds.) (2001). An International Feminist Challenge to Theory. Jai.
  15. Marguerite Deslauriers (2009). Sexual Difference in Aristotle's Politics and His Biology. Classical World 102 (3):215-231.
  16. Frank Dikotter (1996). Sex, Culture and Modernity in China Medical Science and the Construction of Sexual Identities in the Early Republican Period. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (2):241.
  17. Alice H. Eagly & Wendy Wood (2005). Universal Sex Differences Across Patriarchal Cultures [Not Equal] Evolved Psychological Dispositions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):281-283.
    Schmitt's findings provide little evidence that sex differences in sociosexuality are explained by evolved dispositions. These sex differences are better explained by an evolutionary account that treats the psychological attributes of women and men as emergent, given the biological attributes of the sexes, especially female reproductive capacity, and the economic and social structural aspects of societies.
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  18. Susan Feldman (1979). Trebilcot's Two Forms of Androgynism. Journal of Social Philosophy 10 (3):14-16.
  19. Linda Fisher (1992). Gender and Other Categories. Hypatia 7 (3):173 - 179.
    In my discussion of Bordo's paper I leave aside the particulars of her detailed critique of Grimshaw and the issue of the "maleness" of philosophy and focus instead on some questions raised by her analysis of heterogeneity and generality. I find this analysis very persuasive, particularly her counterarguments to the "theoretics of heterogeneity." However, I am less persuaded by her concluding points and suggestions for future directions.
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  20. Judith Genova (1994). Turing's Sexual Guessing Game. Social Epistemology 8 (4):313 – 326.
  21. Kathleen Gerson (2011). The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family. OUP USA.
    In the controversial public debate over modern American families, the vast changes in family life--the rise of single, two-paycheck, and same-sex parents--have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children. Drawing upon pioneering research with the children of the gender revolution, Kathleen Gerson reveals that it is not a lack of "family values," but rigid social and economic forces that make it difficult to have a vibrant and committed family and work life. -/- Despite the entrance of women into (...)
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  22. Kathleen Gerson (2010). The Unfinished Revolution: How a New Generation is Reshaping Family, Work, and Gender in America. OUP USA.
    The vast changes in family life--the rise of single, same-sex, and two-paycheck parents--have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children. Drawing upon pioneering research with the children of the gender revolution, Kathleen Gerson reveals that it is not a lack of "family values," but rigid social and economic forces that make it difficult to live out those values. In the controversial public debate over modern American families, The Unfinished Revolution takes a measured approach, looking at the young adults (...)
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  23. Miqqi Alicia Gilbert (2009). Defeating Bigenderism: Changing Gender Assumptions in the Twenty-First Century. Hypatia 24 (3):93 - 112.
    Bigenderism maintains there are only two genders, which correspond with the two sexes, male and female. Basic bigenderism requires that legal documents and public institutions designate a single invariant gender (that is, sex). Strict bigenderism applies these categories in a social context that stigmatizes "imperfect" men and women who do not reach ideals set by the bigenderist schema. I discuss these concepts and their implications, present three models that successively weaken bigenderist assumptions, and argue for the most radical of the (...)
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  24. James Giles (2012). Adult Baby Syndrome and Age Identity Disorder: Comment on Kise and Nguyen (2011). Archives of Sexual Behavior 41 (2):321-322.
    In Kise and Ngyuen’s “Adult Baby Syndrome and Gender Identity Disorder” (2011), the authors refer to their male subject as “Ms B” because he prefers to identify with being a female. But they do not refer to her as being a baby, even though the subject also prefers to identify with being a baby. This shows that although they respect the subject’s gender identity preferences, they do not respect the subject’s age identity preferences. One reason for this might be that (...)
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  25. Janet Varner Gunn (1998). Book Review: Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. The Roots of Thinking. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990. And Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. The Roots of Power: Animate Form and Gendered Bodies. Chicago: Open Court, 1994. [REVIEW] Hypatia 13 (3):177-181.
  26. Margareta Hallberg (2012). Gender and Philosophy of Science: The Case of Mary Hesse. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (2):333-340.
  27. Nancy J. Holland (2011). Looking Backwards: A Feminist Revisits Herbert Marcuse's "Eros and Civilization". Hypatia 26 (1):65 - 78.
    This paper reconsiders Marcuse's Eros and Civilization from the perspective of Gayle Rubin's classic article "The Traffic in Women." The primary goals of this comparison are to investigate the social and psychological mechanisms that perpetuate the archaic sex/gender system Rubin describes under current conditions of post-industrial capitalism; to open possible new avenues of analysis and liberatory praxis based on these authors' applications of Marxist insights to cultural interpretations of Freud's writings; and to make clearer the role sexual repression continues to (...)
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  28. Ludger Jansen (2009). Die Ontologie des Geschlechts. In Hella Ehlers, Beate Rudlof, Heike Trappe, Gabriele Linke & Heike Kahlert (eds.), Geschlechterdifferenz – und kein Ende? Sozial- und geisteswissenschaftliche Beiträge zur Genderforschung. LIT-Verlag. 19-39.
  29. Stephen Jarosek (2005). The Semiotics of Sexuality. Sign Systems Studies 33 (1):73-135.
    Pragmatism is the idea that we attribute meaning to things that matter to us. Ultimately, the things that matter are intercepted by our bodies — our eyes, ears, nose, hands, feet, skin — right down to our sex differences. Our bodies are the tools with which we interface with the world — the cultural world. Sex differences provide major insights into how the body impacts on experience and thus, personality and ultimately culture’s gender roles. In my earlier paper, I discuss (...)
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  30. Nicola Lacey, From Moll Flanders to Tess of the D'Urbervilles: Women, Autonomy and Criminal Responsibility in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century England.
    In the early 18th Century, Daniel Defoe found it natural to write a novel whose heroine was a sexually adventurous, socially marginal property offender. Only half a century later, this would have been next to unthinkable. In this paper, the disappearance of Moll Flanders, and her supercession in the annals of literary female offenders by heroines like Tess of the d'Urbervilles, serves as a metaphor for fundamental changes in ideas of selfhood, gender and social order in 18th and 19th Century (...)
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  31. Hilge Landweer & Gertrudetr Postl (2005). Anthropological, Social, and Moral Limitations of a Multiplicity of Genders. Hypatia 20 (2):27-47.
    : This work argues from a social-theoretical perspective for the view that every concept of 'gender' remains bound to reproduction. As every culture is interested in its continuity, it distinguishes individuals according to their assumed possible contribution to reproduction and so develops a fundamental dual classification. Subsequent gender categories are necessarily derived from this one. The conceptual and empirical arguments for this thesis are illustrated through an imagined dystopia. There I envision under what conditions a complete dissociation of the concepts (...)
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  32. H. P. P. Lotter (2000). The South African Constitution Requires Men to Be Feminist. Koers 65 (4).
    Can a man be a feminist? If so, what would it mean? I want to participate in a dialogue between women and men on how to accommodate women’s moral concerns. I propose that the fundamental values of justice embodied in the South African constitutional democracy require men to be feminist. These values provide the best safeguard of the important interests and values of both women and men. Men who accept these values can support the main concerns of feminism. The implications (...)
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  33. María Lugones (2009). Cosmology and Gender in Sylvia Marcos's Taken From the Lips. Clr James Journal 15 (1):283-288.
  34. Mary B. Mahowald (1987). Sex-Role Stereotypes in Medicine. Hypatia 2 (2):21 - 38.
    I argue for compatibility between feminism and medicine by developing a model of the physician-other relationship which is essentially egalitarian. This entails rejection of (a) a paternalistic model which reinforces sex-role stereotypes, (b) a maternalistic model which exclusively emphasizes patient autonomy, and (c) a model which focuses on the physician's conscience. The model I propose (parentalism) captures the complexity and dynamism of the physician-other relationship, by stressing mutuality in respect for autonomy and regard for each other's interests.
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  35. Letitia Meynell (2013). Delusions of Gender: How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference. By Cordelia Fine. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2010. Brain Storm: The Flaws in the Science of Sex Differences. By Rebecca M. Jordan‐Young. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (3):684-689.
  36. Ross Morrow (2010). The Ontology of Sex, by Carrie Hull. Journal of Critical Realism 6 (1):158-164.
  37. Ross Morrow (2007). Review of 'The Ontology of Sex: A Critical Inquiry Into the Deconstruction and Reconstruction of Categories' by Carrie Hull. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 6 (1):158-164.
  38. Stella Sandford, Thinking Sex Politically: Rethinking 'Sex' in Plato's Republic.
    This is in a special issue of the journal entitled 'Thinking Politically'. The material derives from Sandford's ongoing book project, contracted to Polity Press, Plato and 'Sex'.
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  39. Robert Sparrow (2010). Why Bioethicists Still Need to Think More About Sex …. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):W1-W3.
  40. Elizabeth S. Spelke (2005). Sex Differences in Intrinsic Aptitude for Mathematics and Science? A Critical Review. American Psychologist 60 (9):950-958.
  41. Silvia Stoller & tr Nielsen, Camilla (2005). Asymmetrical Genders: Phenomenological Reflections on Sexual Difference. Hypatia 20 (2):7-26.
    : One of the most fundamental premises of feminist philosophy is the assumption of an invidious asymmetry between the genders that has to be overcome. Parallel to this negative account of asymmetry we also find a positive account, developed in particular within the context of so-called feminist philosophies of difference. I explore both notions of gender asymmetry. The goal is a clarification of the notion of asymmetry as it can presently be found in feminist philosophy. Drawing upon phenomenology (Merleau-Ponty, Levinas) (...)
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  42. Ásta Kristjana Sveinsdóttir (2012). Review of The Metaphysics of Gender by Charlotte Witt. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2012 (5).
    Review of Charlotte Witt's The Metaphysics of Gender (Oxford 2011).
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  43. Susanne Tauss (1995). The Body of Gender. Körper - Geschlechter - Identitäten. Internationales Symposion: Linz 1994. Die Philosophin 6 (11):117-120.
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  44. J. Arthur Thomson (1895). Book Review:Man and Woman: A Study of Human Secondary Sexual Characters. Havelock Ellis. [REVIEW] Ethics 5 (3):386-.
  45. John Marshall Townsend (1998). Dominance, Sexual Activity, and Sexual Emotions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):386-386.
    Men's interest in sex partners' status traits and commitment (investment thoughts) declines with number of sex partners and permissiveness of attitudes; women's investment thoughts do not seem to decline. Testosterone, dominance, sexual attractiveness, and number of sex partners are correlated in men but not in women. It is plausible that these sex differences are part of sexually dimorphic feedback systems. This type of feedback is consistent with both reciprocal and basal models of testosterone.
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  46. Joseph Daniel Unwin (1934). Sex and Culture. London, Oxford University Press, H. Milford.
  47. Anne van Leeuwen (2010). Sexuate Difference, Ontological Difference: Between Irigaray and Heidegger. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):111-126.
    Animating Luce Irigaray’s oeuvre are two indissociable projects: the disruption of Western metaphysics and the thinking of sexual difference. The intersection of these two projects implies that any attempt to think through the meaning and significance of Irigaray’s notoriously fraught invocation of sexual difference must take seriously the way in which this invocation is itself always already inflected by her disruptive gesture. In this paper, I will attempt to elucidate one moment of this intersection by focusing on her critical engagement (...)
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  48. C. Vidal (2005). Brain, Sex and Ideology. Diogenes 52 (4):127-133.
    Since the 19th century, and despite tremendous progress in science, the topic of 'brain and sex' remains a matter of misleading interpretations, far beyond the field of science. The media are not solely responsible for this situation. Some scientific circles still actively promote the ideology of biological determinism in their attempt to explain differences in behaviour and cognitive abilities between men and women. Experimental data from brain imaging studies, cognitive tests or the discovery of new genes are often distorted to (...)
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  49. Georgia Warnke (2001). Intersexuality and the Categories of Sex. Hypatia 16 (3):126-137.
    : Operations on intersexuals indicate that the sex of a person is based on more than biology. Expectations about proper gender activities furnish the frameworks through which certain features and combinations of features are understood to be fundamental to bodies and to comprise their sex. Yet, we can ask whether this interpretation is either coherent or consistent with our fuller conceptions of ourselves. Is there a point to interpreting a person as a sex?
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  50. Helen Weinreich-Haste (1994). The Sexual Metaphor. Harvard University Press.
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