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  1. Anita Avramides (2001). Other Minds. Routledge.
    How do I know whether there are any minds beside my own? This problem of other minds in philosophy raises questions which are at the heart of all philosophical investigations--how it is that we know, what is in the mind, and whether we can be certain about any of our beliefs. In this book, Anita Avramides begins with a historical overview of the problem from the Ancient Skeptics to Descartes, Malebranche, Locke, Berkeley, Reid, and Wittgenstein. The second part of the (...)
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  2. Stephen Biggs (2009). Phenomenal Concepts in Mindreading. Philosophical Psychology 22 (6):647 – 667.
    In an earlier paper (Biggs, 2007) I argue that those attributing mental states sometimes simulate the phenomenal states of those to whom they are making attributions (i.e., targets). In this paper I argue that such phenomenal simulation plays an important role in some third-person mental state attributions. More specifically, I identity three important roles that phenomenal simulation could play in third-person mental state attributions: phenomenal simulation could cause attributions, facilitate attributions, or deepen simulators' understanding of targets. I then argue that (...)
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  3. Arindam Chakrabarti (2011). Troubles with a Second Self: The Problem of Other Minds in 11th Century Indian and 20th Century Western Philosophy. ARGUMENT 1 (1):23-35.
    In contemporary Western analytic philosophy, the classic analogical argument explaining our knowledge of other minds has been rejected. But at least three alternative positive theories of our knowledge of the second person have been formulated: the theory-theory, the simulation theory and the theory of direct empathy. After sketching out the problems faced by these accounts of the ego’s access to the contents of the mind of a “second ego”, this paper tries to recreate one argument given by Abhinavagupta (Shaiva philosopher (...)
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  4. William Cornwell, Making Sense of the Other: Husserl, Carnap, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein. Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy (Conference Proceedings).
    Phenomenology and logical positivism both subscribed to an empirical-verifiability criterion of mental or linguistic meaning. The acceptance of this criterion confronted them with the same problem: how to understand the Other as a subject with his own experience, if the existence and nature of the Other's experiences cannot be verified. Husserl tackled this problem in the Cartesian Meditations, but he could not reconcile the verifiability criterion with understanding the Other's feelings and sensations. Carnap's solution was to embrace behaviorism and eliminate (...)
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  5. F. de Vignemont (2004). The Co-Consciousness Hypothesis. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):97-114.
    Self-knowledge seems to be radically different from the knowledge of other people. However, rather than focusing on the gap between self and others, we should emphasize their commonality. Indeed, different mirror matching mechanisms have been found in monkeys as well as in humans showing that one uses the same representations for oneself and for the others. But do these shared representations allow one to report the mental states of others as if they were one''s own? I intend in this essay (...)
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  6. Edmond M. Dewan (1957). Other Minds: An Application of Recent Epistemological Ideas to the Definition of Consciousness. Philosophy of Science 24 (January):70-76.
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  7. Chauncey Downes (1965). Husserl and the Coherence of the Other Minds Problem. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 26 (December):253-259.
  8. Sebastian Gardner (1994). Other Minds and Embodiment. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 94:35-52.
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  9. Simon Glendinning (1998). On Being with Others: Heidegger, Derrida, Wittgenstein. Routledge.
    On Being With Others is an outstanding and compelling work that uncovers one of the key questions in philosophy: how can we claim to have knowledge of minds other than our own? <span class='Hi'>Simon</span> Glendinning's fascinating analysis of this problem argues that it has polarized debate to such an extent that we do not know how to meet Wittgenstein's famous challenge that "to see the behavior of a living thing is to see its soul". This book sets out to discover (...)
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  10. Anil Gomes (2011). Is There a Problem of Other Minds? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):353-373.
    Scepticism is sometimes expressed about whether there is any interesting problem of other minds. In this paper I set out a version of the conceptual problem of other minds which turns on the way in which mental occurrences are presented to the subject and situate it in relation to debates about our knowledge of other people's mental lives. The result is a distinctive problem in the philosophy of mind concerning our relation to other people.
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  11. P. M. S. Hacker (1972). Other Minds and Professor Ayer's Concept of a Person. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 32 (March):341-354.
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  12. Benj Hellie (2013). Against Egalitarianism. Analysis 73 (2):304-320.
    ‘Egalitarian' views of consciousness treat my stream of consciousness and yours as on a par ontologically. A range of worries about Chalmers's philosophical system are traced to a background presupposition of egalitarianism: Chalmers is apparently committed to ‘soul pellets'; the ‘phenomenal properties' at the core of the system are obscure; a ‘vertiginous question' about my identity is raised but not adequately answered; the theory of phenomenal concepts conflicts with the ‘transparency of experience'; the epistemology of other minds verges very close (...)
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  13. Alec Hyslop (1975). A Reply to Don Locke. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):68-69.
  14. Douglas C. Long (1964). The Philosophical Concept of a Human Body. Philosophical Review 73 (July):321-337.
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  15. M. McGinn (1998). The Real Problem of Others: Cavell, Merleau-Ponty, and Wittgenstein on Scepticism About Other Minds. European Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):45-58.
  16. Elizabeth Meins (2004). Infants' Minds, Mothers' Minds, and Other Minds: How Individual Differences in Caregivers Affect the Co-Construction of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):116-116.
    Carpendale & Lewis's (C&L's) constructivist account needs greater emphasis on how individual differences in caregivers' impact on the efficacy of epistemic triangle interaction in fostering children's understanding of mind. Caregivers' attunement to their infants' mental states and their willingness to enable infants to participate in exchanges about the mind are posited as important determinants of effective epistemic triangle interaction.
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  17. W. W. Mellor (1956). Three Problems About Other Minds. Mind 65 (April):200-217.
  18. Henry Nelson Wieman (1922). Knowledge of Other Minds. Journal of Philosophy 19 (22):605-611.
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  19. Søren Overgaard (2007). Wittgenstein and Other Minds: Rethinking Subjectivity and Intersubjectivity with Wittgenstein, Levinas, and Husserl. Routledge.
    A compelling new approach to the problem that has haunted twentieth century philosophy in both its analytical and continental shapes. No other book addresses as thoroughly the parallels between Wittgenstein and leading Continental philosophers such as Levinas, Husserl, and Heidegger.
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  20. Søren Overgaard (2006). The Problem of Other Minds: Wittgenstein's Phenomenological Perspective. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):53-73.
    This paper discusses Wittgenstein's take on the problem of other minds. In opposition to certain widespread views that I collect under the heading of the “No Problem Interpretation,” I argue that Wittgenstein does address some problem of other minds. However, Wittgenstein's problem is not the traditional epistemological problem of other minds; rather, it is more reminiscent of the issue of intersubjectivity as it emerges in the writings of phenomenologists such as Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, and Heidegger. This is one sense in which (...)
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  21. Christopher Peacocke (1984). Consciousness and Other Minds. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 58:97-117.
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  22. Christopher Peacocke (1984). Consciousness and Other Minds, Part I. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97:97-118.
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  23. Hanna Pickard (2003). Emotions and the Problem of Other Minds. In A. Hatimoysis (ed.), Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press. 87-103.
    The problem of other minds is a collection of problems centering upon the extent to which our belief in other minds or other's minds can be justified. Swedish psychologist, Gunnar Borg has developed a principle called "the range principle" which helps fill out our "knowledge" of other minds. Borg developed this principle partly in response to the skeptical challenge of Harvard psychophysicist S S Stevens. Stevens claimed that the intersubjective comparison of experience was scientifically impossible. Borg postulates that the range (...)
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  24. Charles Sayward (2003). Applying the Concept of Pain. Iyyun 52 (July):290-300.
    This paper reaches the conclusion that, while there are ordinary cases in which the pretending possibility is reasonable, these cases always contain some element that makes it reasonable. This will be the element we ask for when we ask why pretending possibility is raised. Knowledge that someone else is in pain is a matter of eliminating the proposed element or neutralizing its pain-negating aspect.
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  25. Marilyn Shatz, Henry M. Wellman & Sharon Silber (1983). The Acquisition of Mental Verbs: A Systematic Investigation of the First Reference to Mental State. Cognition 14 (3):301-321.
  26. Joel Smith (2010). The Conceptual Problem of Other Bodies. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (2pt2):201-217.
    The, so called, ‘conceptual problem of other minds’ has been articulated in a number of different ways. I discuss two, drawing out some constraints on an adequate account of the grasp of concepts of mental states. Distinguishing between behaviour-based and identity-based approaches to the problem, I argue that the former, exemplified by Brewer and Pickard, are incomplete as they presuppose, but do not provide an answer to, what I shall call the conceptual problem of other bodies. I end with some (...)
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  27. Karsten Stueber (2006). Rediscovering Empathy: Agency, Folk Psycholgy, and the Human Sciences. MIT Press.
    I do not consider these objections to be able to dislodge my arguments for the epistemic centrality of empathy for understanding agency, since the empathy view is not in fact committed to an implausible Cartesian view of the mind. But I do ...
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  28. Anik Waldow (2009). David Hume and the Problem of Other Minds. Continuum.
    Other minds and their place in the Hume-literature -- A modern approach -- Scepticism versus naturalism -- The vulgar and the philosopher -- Relative ideas -- Concepts of the real -- Intuition and common sense -- Epistemic responsibility -- Degeneration of reason -- Just philosophy -- Conceiving minds -- Abstraction -- Argument from analogy -- Sympathy -- Limitations -- Generality -- Hume's concept of mind -- The world and the other -- Habit and intersubjective responsiveness -- Belief and education -- (...)
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