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  1. Dr Sieghard Beller, Andrea Bender & Gregory Kuhnm (2005). Understanding Conditional Promises and Threats. Thinking and Reasoning 11 (3):209 – 238.
    Conditional promises and threats are speech acts that are used to manipulate other people's behaviour. Studies on human reasoning typically use propositional logic to analyse what people infer from such inducements. While this approach is sufficient to uncover conceptual features of inducements, it fails to explain them. To overcome this limitation, we propose a multilevel analysis integrating motivational, linguistic, deontic, behavioural, and emotional aspects. Commonalities and differences between conditional promises and threats on various levels were examined in two experiments. The (...)
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  2. Nuel D. Belnap Jr (1970). Conditional Assertion and Restricted Quantification. Noûs 4 (1):1-12.
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  3. Gunnar Björnsson, Comments on Lycan's ‘Conditional-Assertion Theories of Conditionals’. Philosophical Communications.
    The overall strategy of Lycan’s paper is to distinguish three kinds of conditional assertion theories, and then to show, in order, how they are variously afflicted by a set of problems. The three kinds of theory were the Quine-Rhinelander theory (or the Simple Illocutionary theory), The Semanticized Quine-Rhinelander, and the No Truth Value theory (or NTV). This strategy offers considerable clarity, but it comes at a cost, for what I take to be the best version of a conditional assertion theory (...)
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  4. John W. Carroll (2005). Boundary in Context. Acta Analytica 20 (1):43-54.
    A contextualist account of modal assertions is sketched that makes their truth sensitive to the presuppositions of the conversation. Support for the account is mustered by considering its application to the context-sensitivity of assertions of subjunctive conditional sentences, explanation sentences, and knowledge sentences.
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  5. Charles K. Cobb Jr (1967). Legal Statements as Conditional Directives. Mind 76 (304):493-512.
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  6. Daniel H. Cohen (1986). A New Axiomatization of Belnap's Conditional Assertion. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 27 (1):124-132.
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  7. Keith DeRose & Richard E. Grandy (1999). Conditional Assertions and "Biscuit" Conditionals. Noûs 33 (3):405-420.
    kind of joke to ask what is the case if the antecedent is false—“And where are the biscuits if I don’t want any?”, “And what’s on PBS if I’m not interested?”, “And who shot Kennedy if that’s not what I’m asking?”. With normal indicative conditionals like.
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  8. Daniel Dohrn, What Zif.
    In a series of articles, David Barnett (2006, 2009, 2010) has developed a general theory of conditionals. The grand aim is to reconcile the two main rivals: a suppositional and a truth-conditional view (Barnett 2006, 521). While I confine my critical discussion to counterfactuals, I will give some hints how they might spell trouble for his suppositional view in general.
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  9. Ian J. Dove (2005). On Assertion and Robustness. Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):85-92.
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  10. J. Michael Dunn (1975). Axiomatizing Belnap's Conditional Assertion. Journal of Philosophical Logic 4 (4):383 - 397.
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  11. J. Michael Dunn (1970). Conditional Assertion and Restricted Quantification: Abstracts of Comments. Noûs 4 (1):13.
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  12. David Holdcroft & Peter Long (1971). Conditional Assertion. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 45:123 - 147.
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  13. John T. Kearns (2006). Conditional Assertion, Denial, and Supposition as Illocutionary Acts. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (4):455 - 485.
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  14. William Lycan (2006). Conditional-Assertion Theories of Conditionals. In Judith Jarvis Thomson & Alex Byrne (eds.), Content and Modality: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Stalnaker. Oxford University Press. 148--164.
    Now under what circumstances is a conditional true? Even to raise this question is to depart from everyday attitudes. An affirmation of the form ‘if p then q’ is commonly felt less as an affirmation of a conditional than as a conditional affirmation of the consequent…. If, after we have made such an affirmation, the antecedent turns out true, then we consider ourselves committed to the consequent, and are ready to acknowledge error if it proves false. If on the other (...)
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  15. Ruth Manor (1974). A Semantic Analysis of Conditional Assertion. Journal of Philosophical Logic 3 (1/2):37 - 52.
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  16. Peter Milne (2004). Algebras of Intervals and a Logic of Conditional Assertions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (5):497-548.
    Intervals in boolean algebras enter into the study of conditional assertions (or events) in two ways: directly, either from intuitive arguments or from Goodman, Nguyen and Walker's representation theorem, as suitable mathematical entities to bear conditional probabilities, or indirectly, via a representation theorem for the family of algebras associated with de Finetti's three-valued logic of conditional assertions/events. Further representation theorems forge a connection with rough sets. The representation theorems and an equivalent of the boolean prime ideal theorem yield an algebraic (...)
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  17. Peter Milne (1997). Bruno de Finetti and the Logic of Conditional Events. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (2):195-232.
    This article begins by outlining some of the history—beginning with brief remarks of Quine's—of work on conditional assertions and conditional events. The upshot of the historical narrative is that diverse works from various starting points have circled around a nexus of ideas without convincingly tying them together. Section 3 shows how ideas contained in a neglected article of de Finetti's lead to a unified treatment of the topics based on the identification of conditional events as the objects of conditional bets. (...)
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  18. Mark T. Nelson (1993). Promises and Material Conditionals. Teaching Philosophy 16 (2):155-156.
    Some beginning logic students find it hard to understand why a material conditional is true when its antecedent is false. I draw an analogy between conditional statements and conditional promises (especially between true conditional statements and unbroken conditional promises) that makes this point of logic less counter-intuitive.
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  19. Josh Parsons, Imperative Conditionals.
    An imperative conditional is a conditional in the imperative mood (by analogy with “indicative conditional”, “subjunctive conditional”). What, in general, is the meaning and the illocutionary effect of an imperative conditional? I survey four answers: the answer that imperative conditionals are commands to the effect that an indicative conditional be true; two versions of the answer that imperative conditionals express irreducibly conditional commands; and finally, the answer that imperative conditionals express a kind of hybrid speech act between command and assertion.
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  20. Roy Sorensen (2012). Lying with Conditionals. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):820-832.
    If you read this abstract, then you will understand what my essay is about. Under what conditions would the preceding assertion be a lie? Traditional definitions of lying are always applied to straight declaratives such as ‘The dog ate my homework’. This one sided diet of examples leaves us unprepared for sentences in which conditional probability governs assertibility. The truth-value of conditionals does not play a significant role in the sincere assertion of conditionals. Lying is insincere assertion. So the connection (...)
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