This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
103 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 103
  1. Richard Adams (2013). Moral Autonomy in Australian Legislation and Military Doctrine. Ethics and Global Politics 6 (3).
    "Australian legislation and military doctrine stipulate that soldiers ‘subjugate their will’ to" "government, and fight in any war the government declares. Neither legislation nor doctrine enables the conscience of soldiers. Together, provisions of legislation and doctrine seem to take soldiers for granted. And, rather than strengthening the military instrument, the convention of legislation and doctrine seems to weaken the democratic foundations upon which the military may be shaped as a force for justice. Denied liberty of their conscience, soldiers are denied (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Lawrence A. Alexander (1976). Self-Defense and the Killing of Noncombatants: A Reply to Fullinwider. Philosophy and Public Affairs 5 (4):408-415.
  3. Andrew Altman & Christopher Heath Wellman (2008). From Humanitarian Intervention to Assassination: Human Rights and Political Violence. Ethics 118 (2):228-257.
  4. Richard Arneson, Just Warfare Theory and Noncombatant Immunity.
    ..............................................................................................101 I. The Idea of a Noncombatant ........................................................104 II. The Moral Shield Protecting Noncombatants.............................106 A. Accommodation.......................................................................107 B. Guilty Past ...............................................................................107 C. Guilty Bystander Trying to Inflict Harm .................................109 D. Guilty Bystander Disposed to Inflict Harm .............................109 E. Guilty Bystander Exulting in Anticipated Evil ........................109 F. Fault Forfeits First Doctrine in Just Warfare ...........................110 III. Noncombatants as Wrongful Trespassers ...................................110 IV. The Noncombatant Status of Captured Soldiers ........................111 V. Guerrilla Combat ..........................................................................116 VI. Morally Innocent Unjust Combatants.........................................118 VII. Should Rights Reflect What (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Alain Badiou (2006). Polemics. Verso.
    PT. 1. PHILOSOPHY AND CIRCUMSTANCES: Introduction -- Philosophy and the question of war today: 1. On September 11 2001: philosophy and the 'War against terrorism' -- 2. Fragments of a public journal on the American war against Iraq -- 3. On the war against Serbia: who strikes whom in the world today? -- The 'democratic' fetish and racism: 4. On parliamentary 'democracy': the French presidential elections of 2002 -- 5. The law on the Islamic headscarf -- 6. Daily humiliation -- (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Banu Bargu (2013). Human Shields. Contemporary Political Theory 12 (4):277.
  7. Mary Ann Barton (1992). Japanese American Relocation: Who is Responsible? Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (2):142-157.
  8. Yitzhak Benbaji (2010). Dehumanization, Lesser Evil and the Supreme Emergency Exemption. Diametros 23:5-21.
    Many believe that if the indiscriminate bombings of German cities at the beginning of World War II were necessary for preventing unlimited spread of Nazism, then the bombings were justified. For, the outcome, in which innocent Germans living in Nazi Germany are killed, was not as bad as the outcome in which the Nazis inflict ethnic cleansing and enslavement on a massive scale. Recently, however, Daniel Statman has advanced a powerful case against this type of justification. I aim in this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robin Blackburn (2002). The Imperial Presidency, the War on Terrorism, and the Revolutions of Modernity. Constellations 9 (1):3-33.
    It is inherent in the concept of a terrorist act that it aims at an effect very much larger than the direct physical destruction it causes. Proponents of what used to be called the 'propaganda of the deed' also believed that in the illuminating glare of terror the vulnerability of a corrupt ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2011). Alexander James Dallas: An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War. An Annotated Edition. Dunedin Academic Press.
    Alexander James Dallas' An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War was written as part of an effort by the then US government to explain and justify its declaration of war in 1812. However publication coincided with the ratification of the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War. The Exposition is especially interesting for the insight it provides into the self-constraint of American foreign policy and of the conduct of a war. The focus is on the foreign policy (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. David K. Chan (2012). Beyond Just War: A Virtue Ethics Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Unlike most books on the ethics of war, this book rejects the 'just war' tradition, proposing a virtue ethics of war to take its place.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. J. Daryl Charles (2006). War, Women, and Political Wisdom: Jean Bethke Elshtain on the Contours of Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):339 - 369.
    One of the most perceptive and ambidextrous social commentators of our day, Augustinian scholar Jean Bethke Elshtain furnishes in ever fresh ways through her writings a bridge between the ancient and the modern, between politics and ethics, between timeless moral wisdom and cultural sensitivity. To read Elshtain seriously is to take the study of culture as well as the "permanent things" seriously. But Elshtain is no mere moralist. Neither is she content solely to dwell in the domain of the theoretical. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Yvonne Chiu (2010). Uniform Exceptions and Rights Violations. Social Theory and Practice 36 (1):44-77.
    Non-uniformed combat morally infringes on civilians’ fundamental right to immunity and exacts an impermissible form of unofficial conscription that is morally prohibited even if the civilians knowingly consent to it. It is often argued that revolutionary groups burdened by resource disparities relative to the state or who claim alternative sources of political legitimacy (such as national self-determination or the constitution of a political collective) are justified in using unconventional tactics such as non-uniformed combat. Neither those reasons nor the provision of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Stephen J. Cimbala (1987). "Launch Under Attack": The War Nobody Wanted. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (2):26-32.
  15. Ian Clark (1988). Waging War: A Philosophical Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    What is war, and how should it be waged? Are there restraints on its conduct? What can philosophers contribute to the study of warfare? Arguing that the practice of war requires a sound philosophical understanding, Ian Clark writes a fascinating synthesis of the philosophy, history, political theory, and contemporary strategy of warfare. Examining the traditional doctrines of the "just" and the "limited" war with fresh insight, Clark also addresses the applicability of these ideas to the modern issues of war crimes, (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. C. A. J. Coady (2012). Stephen Nathanson, Terrorism and the Ethics of War. Social Theory and Practice 38 (3):560-567.
  17. Christopher Coker (2008). Ethics and War in the Twenty-First Century. Routledge.
  18. Christopher Coker (2008). Ethics and War in the 21st Century. Routledge.
    Preface 1. Fighting Terrorism 1:1. A new Discourse on War? 1:2. Richard Rorty and the Ethics of War 2. Etiquettes of Atrocity 2:1. Etiquettes of Atrocity 2:2. Discourses on War 2:3. Keeping the discourse: the United States and Vietnam 2.4. Carl Schmitt and the theory of the Partisan 3. Changing the Discourse 3:1 Germany and the Eastern Front 1941-5 3:2 France and Algeria 1955-8 3:3 Israel and the Intifada 3:4 Conclusion 4. A New Discourse? 4:1. The War on Terror -- (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Rory J. Conces, Book Review: Chechnya: Tombstone of Russian Power. [REVIEW]
    [1] From December 1994 to August 1996, Russia was engaged in the Chechen War, a Vietnam-style quagmire that exemplified, on the one hand, the end of Russia as a great military and imperial power, and, on the other hand, "one of the greatest epics of colonial resistance in the past century.'' No analysis can hope to understand the totality of forces that lend to the stability (or instability) of nations with large minority populations unless it first examines the conditions that (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Mervyn D'Souza (1978). A Second Look at Aspects of Gandhi's Theory of Non-Violence. Journal of Social Philosophy 9 (2):11-14.
  21. Dan Demetriou (2013). Honor War Theory: Romance or Reality? Philosophical Papers 42 (3):285 - 313.
    Just War Theory (JWT) replaced an older "warrior code," an approach to war that remains poorly understood and dismissively treated in the philosophical literature. This paper builds on recent work on honor to address these deficiencies. By providing a clear, systematic exposition of "Honor War Theory" (HWT), we can make sense of paradigm instances of warrior psychology and behavior, and understand the warrior code as the martial expression of a broader honor-based ethos that conceives of obligation in terms of fair (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Lawrence Dennis (1980/1975). The Dynamics of War and Revolution. Institute for Historical Review.
  23. Heinz Duchhardt (1984). Revolution and Universal Civil War. Studies on the Overture After 1789. Philosophy and History 17 (1):86-86.
  24. Krzysztof Dunin-Wąsowicz (2006). The Socialist Movement in the Warsaw Uprising. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (7-9):89-110.
    The decision to start the uprising rested chiefly with a few persons from the high command of the Home Army. Political authorities, including Kazimierz Pużak, PPS and the National Unity Council leader, had no influence on the Uprising outbreak and date decisions.Immediately after the uprising outbreak, the socialist movement joined the action, both in the civilian and military area, as did all socialist movement factions. A very important role was played by the well-developed and influential press, coming out in all (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Hans-Jürgen Eitner (1988). The Costs of Hitler's War. War Funding and the Financial Legacy of the War in Germany, 1933–1948. Philosophy and History 21 (1):61-62.
  26. Patrick Emerton & Toby Handfield (2009). Order and Affray: Defensive Privileges in Warfare. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):382-414.
  27. C. E. Emmer (2007). The Flower and the Breaking Wheel: Burkean Beauty and Political Kitsch. International Journal of the Arts in Society 2 (1):153-164.
    What is kitsch? The varieties of phenomena which can fall under the name are bewildering. Here, I focus on what has been called “traditional kitsch,” and argue that it often turns on the emotional effect specifically captured by Edmund Burke’s concept of “beauty” from his 1757 'A Philosophical Enquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful.' Burkean beauty also serves to distinguish “traditional kitsch” from other phenomena also often called “kitsch”—namely, entertainment. Although I argue that Burkean beauty in domestic decoration allows for (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Stephen L. Esquith (2000). War, Political Violence, and Service Learning. Teaching Philosophy 23 (3):241-254.
  29. Woody Evans (2007). Singularity Warfare: A Bibliometric Survey of Militarized Transhumanism. Journal of Evolution and Technology 16 (1):161-65.
    This paper examines the responses to advanced and transformative technologies in military literature, attenuates the conclusions of earlier work suggesting that there is an “ignorance of transhumanism” in the military, and updates the current layout of transhuman concerns in military thought. The military is not ignorant of transhuman issues and implications, though there was evidence for this in the past; militaries and non-state actors (including terrorists) increasingly use disruptive technologies with what we may call transhuman provenance.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Andrew Fiala (2007). The Bush Doctrine, Democratization, and Humanitarian Intervention
    A Just War Critique.
    Theoria 54 (114):28-47.
  31. H. Frowe (2012). Moral Dilemmas of Modern War: Torture, Assassination, and Blackmail in an Age of Asymmetric Conflict, by Michael Gross. Mind 120 (480):1258-1262.
  32. Helen Frowe (forthcoming). Defensive Killing: An Essay on War and Self-Defence. OUP.
  33. Helen Frowe (2009). Civilian Immunity in War • by Igor Primoratz, Ed. Analysis 69 (2):394-395.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Helen Frowe (2008). Review of Larry May (Ed.), War: Essays in Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (11).
  35. Helen Frowe & Gerald Lang (eds.) (2014). How We Fight: Ethics in War. OUP.
  36. M. A. Gareev (1998). If War Comes Tomorrow?: The Contours of Future Armed Conflict. Frank Cass.
    Military affairs have been affected by major changes in the 19902. The bipolar world of two superpowers has gone. The Cold War and the global military confrontation that accompanied it have ended. A new military and political order has emerged, but the world has not become more stable, indeed, wars and armed conflict have become much more common. Forecasting the contours of future armed conflict is the primary object of this work. Focusing on the impact of new technologies, General Gareev (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Nolen Gertz (2008). Just and Unjust Killing. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (4):247-261.
    To provide a way to understand warfare and debate military conduct, Michael Walzer's Just and Unjust Wars tries to show that civilians and soldiers are not separated by a barrier of violence as we might think, but rather inhabit the same moral world. While this view enables us to question and criticize our leaders during times of war instead of simply claiming ignorance, its success is gained by obscuring certain fundamental boundaries that exist between combatants and noncombatants. By comparing Walzer's (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Paul Gilbert (2005). Proportionality in the Conduct of War. Journal of Military Ethics 4 (2):100-107.
    One of the traditional requirements of jus in bello is that military action should be proportionate in the loss and injury caused to troops to the military objectives it secures. However, the ?overwhelming force? applied in two Gulf Wars has been criticised as disproportionate. This article suggests a criterion for judging whether force is proportionate by considering what those who enter the profession of arms might be expected to tolerate or to undertake. A tacit agreement between troops on each side (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. José L. Gómez del Prado (2012). A U.N. Convention to Regulate PMSCs? Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (3):262-286.
    Abstract In the last 20 years the ruthless competition for natural resources, political instability, armed conflicts, and the terrorist attacks of 9/11 have paved the way for private military and security companies (PMSCs) to operate in areas which were until recently the preserve of the state. PMSCs, less regulated than the toy industry, commit grave human rights violations with impunity. The United Nations has elaborated an international binding instrument to regulate their activities but the opposition of the U.S., U.K., and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Toby Handfield & Patrick Emerton (2009). Order and Affray: Defensive Privileges in Warfare. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):382 - 414.
    Just war theory is a difficult, even paradoxical, philosophical topic. It is not just that warfare involves large-scale, organised, deliberate killing, and hence might seem the very paradigm of immorality. The just war tradition sharply divorces the question of whether or not it is permissible to resort to war – the question of jus ad bellum – from the question of how and against whom one may inflict harm once at war – the question of jus in bello. As Michael (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Yuval N. Harari (2008). The Ultimate Experience: Battlefield Revelations and the Making of Modern War Culture, 1450-2000. Palgrave Macmillan.
    For millennia, war was viewed as a supreme test. In the period 1750-1850 war became much more than a test: it became a secular revelation. This new understanding of war as revelation completely transformed Western war culture, revolutionizing politics, the personal experience of war, the status of common soldiers, and the tenets of military theory.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. E. G. Hardy (1909). Henderson's Civil War and Rebellion Civil War and Rebellion in the Roman Empire. A Companion to the Histories of Tacitus. By Bernard W. Henderson, M.A., Sub-Rector and Tutor of Exeter College, Oxford. London: Macmillan & Co. 1908. 8vo. Pp. Xxiii + 360. Four Illustrations From Busts, Maps and Plans. [REVIEW] Classical Quarterly 3 (02):137-.
  43. R. M. Hare (1972). Rules of War and Moral Reasoning. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (2):166-181.
  44. Ranjoo Seodu Herr (2013). ‘Comfort Women’ and Japan’s National Responsibility. In Jun-Hyeok Kwak & Melissa Nobles (eds.), Historical Reconciliation and Inherited Responsibility. Routledge. 1--145.
  45. Alexander Keller Hirsch (2011). Fugitive Reconciliation: The Agonistics of Respect, Resentment and Responsibility in Post-Conflict Society. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (2):166.
  46. Carl Cavanagh Hodge (2000). Casual War: Nato's Intervention in Kosovo. Ethics and International Affairs 14 (1):39–54.
  47. Zachary Hoskins (2011). ''Non-Combatant Immunity''. In Dean K. Chatterjee (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Justice. Springer.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Thomas Hurka (2005). Proportionality in the Morality of War. Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (1):34–66.
  49. Leonard Kahn (2010). Just War Theory, Political Liberalism, and Non-Combatant Immunity. Theoretical and Applied Ethics.
    The is a brief response to Matthew Bruenig's "Rethinking Noncombatant Immunity." I argue, contra Bruenig, that political liberalism does not raise any special problems for the view that non-combatants should not be directly targeted by another country's military.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Shawn Kaplan (2012). Just War Theory: What Is It Good For? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (2):4-14.
    The usefulness of Just War Theory (JWT) has been called into question in recent years for two key reasons. First, military conflicts today less frequently fit the model traditionally assumed by JWT of interstate wars between regular armies. Second, there is a perception that JWT has lost its critical edge after its categories and principles have been co-opted by bellicose political leaders. This paper critically examines two responses to these concerns which shift the locus of responsibility for wars towards either (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 103