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  1. David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei (2009). Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):473 - 482.
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study in the Chinese automobile (...)
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  2. Robert E. Allinson (1992). The Golden Rule as the Core Value in Confucianism & Christianity: Ethical Similarities and Differences. Asian Philosophy 2 (2):173 – 185.
    Abstract One side of this paper is devoted to showing that the Golden Rule, understood as standing for universal love, is centrally characteristic of Confucianism properly understood, rather than graded, familial love. In this respect Confucianism and Christianity are similar. The other side of this paper is devoted to arguing contra 18 centuries of commentators that the negative sentential formulation of the Golden Rule as found in Confucius cannot be converted to an affirmative sentential formulation (as is found in Christianity) (...)
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  3. Robert E. Allinson (1985). The Confucian Golden Rule: A Negative Formualtion. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (3):305-315.
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  4. Wayne Alt (2005). Ritual and the Social Construction of Sacred Artifacts: An Analysis of "Analects" 6.25. Philosophy East and West 55 (3):461-469.
    Some well-known translations of the words attributed to the Master in Analects 6.25, "gu bu gu gu zai gu zai," are analyzed and sorted out. It is argued that this passage can be given a consistent reading and an interpretation that coheres with a major theme of the text, namely that the ontological status of a thing, like that of a person, is relative to the practice of constitutive rules and conventions.
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  5. Wayne Alt (1994). Revisiting the Shop of Confucius. Asian Philosophy 4 (1):81 – 87.
    The East Asian Region: Confucian Heritage And Its Modern Adaptation. Gilbert Rozman, 1990 Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1990 v?x + 235 pp., $29.95.
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  6. Roger T. Ames (1981). A Response to Fingarette on Ideal Authority in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (1):51-57.
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  7. Roger T. Ames & Henry Rosemont, Jr (1999). The Analects of Confucius: A Philosophical Translation. Ballantine.
    The earliest Analects yet discovered, this work provides us with a new perspective on the central canonical text that has defined Chinese culture--and clearly illuminates the spirit and values of Confucius.
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  8. Yanming An (2008). Family Love in Confucius and Mencius. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):51-55.
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  9. Robert Ashmore (2004). Word and Gesture: On. Philosophy East and West 54 (4).
    : This is an attempt to assemble the fragmentary remains of xuan-school Analects commentary so as to articulate the broad coherence of a xuan-school style of interpretation of that text. A model of "gestural language" is proposed as a way of seeing the overall thrust of interpretive approaches to this text by commentators from Wang Bi in the mid-third century to Huang Kan in the first half of the sixth. This xuan-school approach to reading the Analects is of considerable interest (...)
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  10. Robert Ashmore (2004). Word and Gesture: On Xuan-School Hermeneutics of the Analects. Philosophy East and West 54 (4):458-488.
    This is an attempt to assemble the fragmentary remains of xuan-school Analects commentary so as to articulate the broad coherence of a xuan-school style of interpretation of that text. A model of "gestural language" is proposed as a way of seeing the overall thrust of interpretive approaches to this text by commentators from Wang Bi in the mid-third century to Huang Kan in the first half of the sixth. This xuan-school approach to reading the Analects is of considerable interest in (...)
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  11. Tongdong Bai (2010). What to Do in an Unjust State?: On Confucius's and Socrates's Views on Political Duty. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):375-390.
    Confucius argued for the centrality of the superior man’s political duty to his fellow human beings and to the state, while Socrates suggested that the superior man (the philosopher) may have no such political duty. However, Confucius also suggested that one not enter or stay—let alone save—a troubled state, while Socrates stayed in an unjust state, apparently fulfilling his political duty to the state by accepting an unjust verdict. In this essay, I will try to show how Confucius could solve (...)
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  12. Tongdong Bai (2009). The Price of Serving Meat—on Confucius's and Mencius's Views of Human and Animal Rights. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):85 – 99.
    The apparent conflict between some fundamental ideas of Confucianism and of rights seems to render Confucianism incompatible with rights. I will illustrate the general strategies, based upon an insight of the later Rawls, to solve the incompatibility problem. I will then show how these strategies can help us to develop a Confucian account of animal rights, which, by way of example, demonstrates how Confucianism can endorse and develop unique and constructive accounts of most rights that are commonly recognized today.
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  13. Tongdong Bai (2008). Back to Confucius: A Comment on the Debate on the Confucian Idea of Consanguineous Affection. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):27-33.
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  14. Adam D. Bailey (2011). Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-672.
    Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea of “Confucian community,” Confucian community should be viewed as a moral ideal. I (...)
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  15. Adam D. Bailey & Alan Strudler (2011). Dialogue - The Confucian Critique of Rights-Based Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-677.
    Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace by Adam D. Bailey - Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea (...)
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  16. Jim P. Behuniak (1998). Poem as Proposition in the Analects: A Whiteheadian Reading of a Confucian Sensibility. Asian Philosophy 8 (3):191 – 202.
    I suggest that ubiquitous references made by Confucius to poetic songs in the Analects reveal an important aspect of his philosophy. This aspect involves the assumption that things in the world “resonate” with one another. Using elements of Alfred North Whitehead's thought, as well as metaphysical insights from the Han Dynasty text, Huainanzi, I first present an aesthetic theory along with a supporting cosmological vision that enhances our appreciation of this trait in the Confucian world. With these preliminaries in mind, (...)
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  17. Donald Blakeley (2010). The Analects on Death. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):397-416.
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  18. Donald N. Blakeley (2008). Hearts in Agreement: Zhuangzi on Dao Adept Friendship. Philosophy East and West 58 (3):pp. 318-336.
    This essay examines two stories in Zhuangzi chapter 6 that provide detailsabout the formal, substantive, and applied features of friendship between daoadepts. Using a template of seven characteristics, dao adept friendship is thencompared with ren adept friendship, described in the Analects and theMencius. It is argued that dao living contains features of friendship that arecomparably robust. As unconventional as dao adept living may be, friendshipis not lacking but integral to such a life.
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  19. Mary I. Bockover (2010). Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Foundational Concepts. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):307-316.
    Confucianism conceives of persons as being necessarily interdependent, defining personhood in terms of the various roles one embodies and that are established by the relationships basic to one's life. By way of contrast, the Western philosophical tradition has predominantly defined persons in terms of intrinsic characteristics not thought to depend on others. This more strictly and explicitly individualistic concept of personhood contrasts with the Confucian idea that one becomes a person because of others; where one is never a person independently (...)
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  20. Freya Boedicker (2009). The Philosophy of Tai Chi Chuan: Wisdom From Confucius, Lao Tzu, and Other Great Thinkers. Blue Snake Books.
    Each chapter of this concise volume focuses on a single work or philosopher, and includes a short history of each one as well as a description of their ...
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  21. Erica Brindley (2011). Moral Autonomy and Individual Sources of Authority in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):257-273.
  22. Erica Brindley (2009). “Why Use an Ox-Cleaver to Carve a Chicken?” The Sociology of the Junzi Ideal in the Lunyu. Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 47-70.
    Central to Confucian teachings in the Analects is the ideal of self-cultivation—in particular that of the junzi 君子 (“gentleman” “nobleman”) ideal. At the same time that Confucius recommends that individuals follow such an ideal, he also places limits on who actually might attain it. By examining statements involving such terms as the junzi, the “petty man” ( xiao ren 小人), and the “masses” ( min 民, or zhong 眾), or common people, this essay highlights the sociopolitical and gender restrictions informing (...)
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  23. Miranda Brown & Uffe Bergeton (2008). "Seeing" Like a Sage: Three Takes on Identity and Perception in Early China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):641-662.
  24. A. S. C. (1973). Confucius. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):159-160.
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  25. V. C. C. (1956). Confucius, His Life and Time. Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):179-179.
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  26. Xiqin Cai (ed.) (2006). Confucius Says =. Hua Yu Jiao Xue Chu Ban She.
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  27. Zhizhong Cai (1996). Confucius Speaks: Words to Live By. Anchor Books.
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  28. Zhizhong Cai (1991). The Sayings of Mencius: Wisdom in a Chaotic Era. Asiapac.
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  29. Zong-qi Cai (1999). In Quest of Harmony: Plato and Confucius on Poetry. Philosophy East and West 49 (3):317-345.
    How Plato and Confucius formulate their views on poetry in light of their overriding concerns with harmony is examined here. Both acknowledge the educational value of poetry in similar terms and set up similar moral-aesthetic standards. Both rank poetry lower than other objects of learning because they find poetic harmony to be less significant than intellectual or moral harmonies. But both take note of the transforming aesthetic experience afforded by poetry in certain circumstances, and identify this experience of the attainment (...)
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  30. William A. Callahan (1994). Resisting the Norm: Ironic Images of Marx and Confucius. Philosophy East and West 44 (2):279-301.
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  31. Edward S. Casey (1984). Commemoration and Perdurance in the Analects. Books I and II. Philosophy East and West 34 (4):389-399.
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  32. Alan Chan (1984). Philosophical Hermeneutics and the Analects: The Paradigm of "Tradition". Philosophy East and West 34 (4):421-436.
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  33. See Yee Chan (1999). Disputes on the One Thread of Chung-Shu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (2):165-186.
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  34. Sin Yee Chan (2000). Gender and Relationship Roles in the Analects and the Mencius. Asian Philosophy 10 (2):115 – 132.
    In this paper I argue that the conception of gender as illustrated in the Analects and the Mencius is basically a functional one that assigns women a domestic role. I show how this conception might imply the exclusion of women from the moral ideal of chun-tzu, which would result in the further subordination of women as wives to men as husbands in the context of the Confucian role system. On the other hand, I show how the Confucian role system can (...)
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  35. Chʻi-yün Chang (1954). A Life of Confucius. Taipei, China Culture Pub. Foundation.
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  36. Yu Chang (2010). The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu XI's Discussion of “Dreams”—and on “Confucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.
    Dreams were a topic of study even in ancient times, and they are a special spiritual phenomenon. Generations of literati have defined the meaning of dreams in their own way, while Zhu Xi was perhaps the most outstanding one among them. He made profound explanations of dreams from aspects such as the relationship between dreams and the principles li and qi , the relationship between dreams and the state of the heart, and the relationship (...)
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  37. Deron Chen (2009). Dao Legislates for Humans Vs. Humans Legislate for Themselves : A Comparison of Laozi's and Confucius' Conceptions of Dao. In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Creating a Global Dialogue on Value Inquiry: Papers From the Xxii Congress of Philosophy (Rethinking Philosophy Today). Edwin Mellen Press.
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  38. Hongxing Chen (2010). Reproduction, Familiarity, Love, and Humaneness: How Did Confucius Reveal “Humaneness”? [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):506-522.
    This article draws out the subtle connections among the various sorts of categories— sheng 生 (reproduction), qin 亲 (familiarity), ai 爱 (love), and ren 仁 (humaneness) —focusing on the following: Confucius found the original significance of reproduction to be sympathy between males and females, and upon further study he found it extended to the.affinity of blood relations, namely familiarity. From familiarity he came to understand love that one generates and has for people and things beyond one’s blood relations, in other (...)
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  39. Jingpan Chen (1990). Confucius as a Teacher: Philosophy of Confucius with Special Reference to its Educational Implications. Foreign Languages Press.
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  40. Junmin Chen (1987). Clarifications on Confucius' Confucianism: Concerning the Rise of Confucianists in the Confucian School Founded by Confucius and its Historical Position. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 14 (1):91-95.
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  41. Lai Chen (2010). Virtue Ethics and Confucian Ethics. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):275-287.
    This essay focuses on the unity of several virtues in pre-Qin Confucians. Confucius maintains the proper application and coherence of such virtues as benevolence, wisdom, trustworthiness, straightforwardness, courage, and firmness. Further, Confucius takes benevolence and nobility as characteristic of human being. Particular attention is paid to the distinction and relationship between virtuous characters and virtuous actions.
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  42. Ning Chen (1997). Confucius' View of Fate (Ming). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (3):323-359.
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  43. Xiao-Yang Chen (2007). Defensive Medicine or Economically Motivated Corruption? A Confucian Reflection on Physician Care in China Today. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):635 – 648.
    In contemporary China, physicians tend to require more diagnostic work-ups and prescribe more expensive medications than are clearly medically indicated. These practices have been interpreted as defensive medicine in response to a rising threat of potential medical malpractice lawsuits. After outlining recent changes in Chinese malpractice law, this essay contends that the overuse of expensive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions cannot be attributed to malpractice concerns alone. These practice patterns are due as well, if not primarily, to the corruption of medical (...)
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  44. Chung-Ying Cheng (2012). On Internal Onto-Genesis of Virtues in the Analects: A Conceptual Analysis. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):8-25.
    Confucius must have inspired his disciples to identify the process and structure of the human self and required self-cultivation in embodying and developing virtues within and practicing virtues as potential ways for its full self-realization. My discussion will be carried out through a conceptual and onto-hermeneutic analysis of the underlying self (ji) structure and its born nature and mind as content as deliberated in the Lunyu (the Analects). On the basis of this approach we will come to see how a (...)
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  45. Chung-ying Cheng (2007). Justice and Peace in Kant and Confucius. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (3):345–357.
  46. Chung-Ying Cheng (2006). Theoretical Links Between Kant and Confucianism: Preliminary Remarks. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (1):3–15.
  47. Chung-ying Cheng (2005). Confucian Ren and Deweyan Experience: A Review Essay on Joseph Grange's John Dewey, Confucius, and the Global Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (4):641–648.
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  48. Leo K. C. Cheung (2004). The Unification of Dao and Ren in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):313–327.
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  49. Tak Sing Cheung & Ambrose Yeo-chi king (2004). Righteousness and Profitableness: The Moral Choices of Contemporary Confucian Entrepreneurs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (3):245 - 260.
    The present study takes Confucian entrepreneurs as an entry point to portray the dynamics and problems involved in the process of putting moral precepts into practice, a central issue in business ethics. Confucian entrepreneurs are defined as the owners of manufacturing or business firms who harbor the moral values of Confucianism. Other than a brief account of their historical background, 41 subjects from various parts of Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur were selected for in-depth interviews. By (...)
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  50. Ann-Ping Chin (2007). The Authentic Confucius: A Life of Thought and Politics. Scribner.
    For more than two thousand years, Confucius has been an inseparable part of China's history. Yet despite this fame,Confucius the man has been elusive. Now, in The Authentic Confucius , Annping Chin has worked through the most reliable Chinese texts in her quest to sort out what is really known about Confucius from the reconstructions and the guesswork that muddled his memory. Chin skillfully illuminates the political and social climate in which Confucius lived. She explains how Confucius made the transition (...)
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