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  1. S. C. A. (1973). Confucius. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):159-160.
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  2. David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei (2009). Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):473 - 482.
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study in the Chinese automobile (...)
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  3. Robert E. Allinson (1992). The Golden Rule as the Core Value in Confucianism & Christianity: Ethical Similarities and Differences. Asian Philosophy 2 (2):173 – 185.
    Abstract One side of this paper is devoted to showing that the Golden Rule, understood as standing for universal love, is centrally characteristic of Confucianism properly understood, rather than graded, familial love. In this respect Confucianism and Christianity are similar. The other side of this paper is devoted to arguing contra 18 centuries of commentators that the negative sentential formulation of the Golden Rule as found in Confucius cannot be converted to an affirmative sentential formulation (as is found in Christianity) (...)
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  4. Robert E. Allinson (1985). The Confucian Golden Rule: A Negative Formualtion. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (3):305-315.
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  5. Wayne Alt (2005). Ritual and the Social Construction of Sacred Artifacts: An Analysis of "Analects" 6.25. Philosophy East and West 55 (3):461-469.
    Some well-known translations of the words attributed to the Master in Analects 6.25, "gu bu gu gu zai gu zai," are analyzed and sorted out. It is argued that this passage can be given a consistent reading and an interpretation that coheres with a major theme of the text, namely that the ontological status of a thing, like that of a person, is relative to the practice of constitutive rules and conventions.
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  6. Wayne Alt (1994). Revisiting the Shop of Confucius. Asian Philosophy 4 (1):81 – 87.
    The East Asian Region: Confucian Heritage And Its Modern Adaptation. Gilbert Rozman, 1990 Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1990 v?x + 235 pp., $29.95.
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  7. Roger T. Ames (2011). Confucian Role Ethics: A Vocabulary. The Chinese University Press.
  8. Roger T. Ames (1988). Confucius and the Ontology of Knowing. In Eliot Deutsch & Gerald James Larson (eds.), Interpreting Across Boundaries: New Essays in Comparative Philosophy. Princeton University Press 265-279.
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  9. Roger T. Ames (1981). A Response to Fingarette on Ideal Authority in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (1):51-57.
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  10. Roger T. Ames & Henry Rosemont, Jr (1999). The Analects of Confucius: A Philosophical Translation. Ballantine.
    The earliest Analects yet discovered, this work provides us with a new perspective on the central canonical text that has defined Chinese culture--and clearly illuminates the spirit and values of Confucius.
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  11. Yanming An (2008). Family Love in Confucius and Mencius. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):51-55.
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  12. Robert Ashmore (2004). Word and Gesture: On. Philosophy East and West 54 (4).
    : This is an attempt to assemble the fragmentary remains of xuan-school Analects commentary so as to articulate the broad coherence of a xuan-school style of interpretation of that text. A model of "gestural language" is proposed as a way of seeing the overall thrust of interpretive approaches to this text by commentators from Wang Bi in the mid-third century to Huang Kan in the first half of the sixth. This xuan-school approach to reading the Analects is of considerable interest (...)
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  13. Robert Ashmore (2004). Word and Gesture: On Xuan-School Hermeneutics of the Analects. Philosophy East and West 54 (4):458-488.
    This is an attempt to assemble the fragmentary remains of xuan-school Analects commentary so as to articulate the broad coherence of a xuan-school style of interpretation of that text. A model of "gestural language" is proposed as a way of seeing the overall thrust of interpretive approaches to this text by commentators from Wang Bi in the mid-third century to Huang Kan in the first half of the sixth. This xuan-school approach to reading the Analects is of considerable interest in (...)
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  14. Eddie R. Babor (2012). Confucius on Virtues: Paradigm of Social and Moral Order. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 1 (1).
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  15. Archie J. Bahm (1977). The Heart of Confucius: Interpretations of Genuine Living and Great Wisdom. Southern Illinois University Press.
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  16. Tongdong Bai (2010). What to Do in an Unjust State?: On Confucius's and Socrates's Views on Political Duty. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):375-390.
    Confucius argued for the centrality of the superior man’s political duty to his fellow human beings and to the state, while Socrates suggested that the superior man (the philosopher) may have no such political duty. However, Confucius also suggested that one not enter or stay—let alone save—a troubled state, while Socrates stayed in an unjust state, apparently fulfilling his political duty to the state by accepting an unjust verdict. In this essay, I will try to show how Confucius could solve (...)
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  17. Tongdong Bai (2009). The Price of Serving Meat—on Confucius's and Mencius's Views of Human and Animal Rights. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):85 – 99.
    The apparent conflict between some fundamental ideas of Confucianism and of rights seems to render Confucianism incompatible with rights. I will illustrate the general strategies, based upon an insight of the later Rawls, to solve the incompatibility problem. I will then show how these strategies can help us to develop a Confucian account of animal rights, which, by way of example, demonstrates how Confucianism can endorse and develop unique and constructive accounts of most rights that are commonly recognized today.
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  18. Tongdong Bai (2008). Back to Confucius: A Comment on the Debate on the Confucian Idea of Consanguineous Affection. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):27-33.
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  19. Adam D. Bailey (2011). Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-672.
    Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea of “Confucian community,” Confucian community should be viewed as a moral ideal. I (...)
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  20. Adam D. Bailey & Alan Strudler (2011). Dialogue - The Confucian Critique of Rights-Based Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-677.
    Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace by Adam D. Bailey - Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea (...)
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  21. Pengshan Bao (2010). Kongzi Shi Zen Yang Lian Cheng De. Zhongguo Min Zhu Fa Zhi Chu Ban She.
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  22. G. Barden & R. Weber, Rhetorics of Authority: Leviticus and the Analects Compared.
    The biblical text Leviticus and the Confucian Analects might appear as neither an obvious nor a very promising choice for a comparative philosophical exercise. To be sure, both texts now and then do share some similarity in matter. But such similarity in matter upon closer examination and contextualisation frequently turns out to be undermined by overt differences which call into question the comparative effort. Our comparison therefore proceeds from a different angle and is motivated by an asserted similarity in rhetoric, (...)
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  23. Jim P. Behuniak (1998). Poem as Proposition in the Analects: A Whiteheadian Reading of a Confucian Sensibility. Asian Philosophy 8 (3):191 – 202.
    I suggest that ubiquitous references made by Confucius to poetic songs in the Analects reveal an important aspect of his philosophy. This aspect involves the assumption that things in the world “resonate” with one another. Using elements of Alfred North Whitehead's thought, as well as metaphysical insights from the Han Dynasty text, Huainanzi, I first present an aesthetic theory along with a supporting cosmological vision that enhances our appreciation of this trait in the Confucian world. With these preliminaries in mind, (...)
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  24. Daniel A. Bell (2012). A Comment on Confucian Role Ethics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (4):604-609.
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  25. M. Benetatou (forthcoming). Does a Politician Need Paideia? The Contextualized Vantage of (Neo) Confucian and Platonic Ethics. Philosophy of Education.
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  26. L. I. Bin (2004). The Modern Revelation of Confucius' Ethics. Ethics 2:015.
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  27. Donald Blakeley (2010). The Analects on Death. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):397-416.
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  28. Donald N. Blakeley (2008). Hearts in Agreement: Zhuangzi on Dao Adept Friendship. Philosophy East and West 58 (3):pp. 318-336.
    This essay examines two stories in Zhuangzi chapter 6 that provide detailsabout the formal, substantive, and applied features of friendship between daoadepts. Using a template of seven characteristics, dao adept friendship is thencompared with ren adept friendship, described in the Analects and theMencius. It is argued that dao living contains features of friendship that arecomparably robust. As unconventional as dao adept living may be, friendshipis not lacking but integral to such a life.
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  29. Mary I. Bockover (2010). Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Foundational Concepts. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):307-316.
    Confucianism conceives of persons as being necessarily interdependent, defining personhood in terms of the various roles one embodies and that are established by the relationships basic to one's life. By way of contrast, the Western philosophical tradition has predominantly defined persons in terms of intrinsic characteristics not thought to depend on others. This more strictly and explicitly individualistic concept of personhood contrasts with the Confucian idea that one becomes a person because of others; where one is never a person independently (...)
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  30. Derk Bodde (1933). A Perplexing Passage In The Confucian Analects. Journal of the American Oriental Society 53 (4):347-351.
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  31. Professor Bodde & H. Creel (1951). Notes on Professor Bodde's Review of "Confucius, the Man and the Myth". Journal of the American Oriental Society 71 (2):146-147.
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  32. Freya Boedicker (2009). The Philosophy of Tai Chi Chuan: Wisdom From Confucius, Lao Tzu, and Other Great Thinkers. Blue Snake Books.
    Each chapter of this concise volume focuses on a single work or philosopher, and includes a short history of each one as well as a description of their ...
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  33. Erica Brindley (2011). Moral Autonomy and Individual Sources of Authority in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):257-273.
  34. Erica Brindley (2009). “Why Use an Ox-Cleaver to Carve a Chicken?” The Sociology of the Junzi Ideal in the Lunyu. Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 47-70.
    Central to Confucian teachings in the Analects is the ideal of self-cultivation—in particular that of the junzi 君子 (“gentleman” “nobleman”) ideal. At the same time that Confucius recommends that individuals follow such an ideal, he also places limits on who actually might attain it. By examining statements involving such terms as the junzi, the “petty man” ( xiao ren 小人), and the “masses” ( min 民, or zhong 眾), or common people, this essay highlights the sociopolitical and gender restrictions informing (...)
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  35. E. Bruce Brooks & A. Taeko Brooks (1998). The Original Analects: Sayings of Confucius and His Successors. Columbia University Press.
    This new translation presents the _Analects_ in a revolutionary new format that, for the first time in any language, distinguishes the original words of the Master from the later sayings of his disciples and their followers, enabling readers to experience China's most influential philosophical work in its true historical, social, and political context.
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  36. Miranda Brown & Uffe Bergeton (2008). "Seeing" Like a Sage: Three Takes on Identity and Perception in Early China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):641-662.
  37. Nicholas Bunnin (2014). Aspects of the Self in the Analects. The Philosophers' Magazine 65:91-98.
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  38. A. S. C. (1973). Confucius. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):159-160.
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  39. A. S. C. (1973). Confucius. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):159-160.
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  40. V. C. C. (1956). Confucius, His Life and Time. Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):179-179.
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  41. Cheng C.-Y. (1977). Rectifying Names(Cheng-Ming) in Classical Confucianism. Chinese Studies in Philosophy 8 (3):67-81.
    The concept of rectifying names [cheng-ming] is a familiar one in the Confucian Analects. It occupies an important, if not central, position in the political philosophy of Confucius. Since, according to Confucius, the rectification of names is the basis of the establishment of social harmony and political order, one might suspect that later political theories of Confucian-ists should be traced back to the Confucian doctrine of rectifying names. It need not be added that the theory of rectifying names, as developed (...)
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  42. Degui Cai (2009). Kongzi Vs Jidu. Shi Jie Zhi Shi Chu Ban She.
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  43. Renhou Cai (1998). Kongzi di Sheng Ming Jing Jie Ru Xue di Fan Si Yu Kai Zhan. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  44. Xiqin Cai (ed.) (2006). Confucius Says =. Hua Yu Jiao Xue Chu Ban She.
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  45. Zhizhong Cai (1996). Confucius Speaks: Words to Live By. Anchor Books.
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  46. Zhizhong Cai (1991). The Sayings of Mencius: Wisdom in a Chaotic Era. Asiapac.
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  47. Zong-qi Cai (1999). In Quest of Harmony: Plato and Confucius on Poetry. Philosophy East and West 49 (3):317-345.
    How Plato and Confucius formulate their views on poetry in light of their overriding concerns with harmony is examined here. Both acknowledge the educational value of poetry in similar terms and set up similar moral-aesthetic standards. Both rank poetry lower than other objects of learning because they find poetic harmony to be less significant than intellectual or moral harmonies. But both take note of the transforming aesthetic experience afforded by poetry in certain circumstances, and identify this experience of the attainment (...)
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  48. William A. Callahan (1994). Resisting the Norm: Ironic Images of Marx and Confucius. Philosophy East and West 44 (2):279-301.
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  49. Edward S. Casey (1984). Commemoration and Perdurance in the Analects. Books I and II. Philosophy East and West 34 (4):389-399.
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  50. Alan Chan (1984). Philosophical Hermeneutics and the Analects: The Paradigm of "Tradition". Philosophy East and West 34 (4):421-436.
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