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  1. Miguel Abensour (2009). Utopía: ¿Futuro y/o Alteridad? Daimon 46:15-32.
    Este artículo propone recorrer las diferentes perspectivas desde las que históricamente se ha pensado la utopía. En este recorrido Miguel Abensour subraya dos giros fundamentales. El primero sería la asignación de la utopía al tiempo por medio de su transferencia a una ontología dialéctica, operación llevada a cabo por Marx e identificada por Marc Bloch. El segundo, aún más importante en cuanto se trata de una tarea presente, sería la superación de los límites que la previsión dialéctica impone a la (...)
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  2. T. Alter (2012). Consciousness and the Prospects of Physicalism, by Derk Pereboom. Mind 121 (484):1115-1122.
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  3. Torin Alter, Deviant Phenomenal Knowledge.
  4. James Anderson, Pain, Private Language and the Mind-Body Problem.
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  5. Mary Aquin (1948). Mary of Nazareth. Thought 23 (4):748-748.
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  6. Leslie Armour (1993). Descartes and Eustachius a Sancto Paulo: Unravelling the Mind-Body Problem. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 1 (2):3 – 21.
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  7. David M. Armstrong (1973). Epistemological Foundations for a Materialist Theory of Mind. Philosophy of Science 40 (June):178-93.
    A philosophy might take its general inspiration from (1) commonsense; (2) careful observation; (3) philosophical argumentation; (4) the sciences; (5) "higher" sources of illumination. It is argued in this paper that it is bedrock commonsense, and the sciences, which are the most reliable foundations for a philosophy. This result is applied to the discussion and defense of a materialist theory of the mind.
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  8. Andrew R. Bailey (2005). Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness, by John Perry. Disputatio.
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  9. John Robert Baker (1983). On the Conceivability of God's Non-Existence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):313-320.
  10. Pierfrancesco Basile (2014). Mind & Cosmos: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature is Almost Certainly False by Thomas Nagel. Process Studies 43 (1):111-114.
  11. Jared Bates (2009). A Defence of the Explanatory Argument for Physicalism. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (235):315-324.
    One argument for reductive physicalism, the explanatory argument, rests on its ability to explain the vast and growing body of acknowledged psychophysical correlations. Jaegwon Kim has recently levelled four objections against the explanatory argument. I assess all of Kim's objections, showing that none is successful. The result is a defence of the explanatory argument for physicalism.
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  12. Alexander Batthyany & Avshalom C. Elitzur (eds.) (2009). Irreducibly Conscious. Selected Papers on Consciousness. Winter.
  13. Timothy J. Bayne (2001). Chalmers on the Justification of Phenomenal Judgments. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):407-19.
    We seem to enjoy a very special kind of epistemic relation to our own conscious states. In The Conscious Mind (TCM), David Chalmers argues that our phenomenal judgments are fully-justified or certain because we are acquainted with the phenomenal states that are the objects of such judgments. Chalmers holds that the acquaintance account of phenomenal justification is superior to reliabilist accounts of how it is that our PJs are justified, because it alone can underwrite the certainty of our phenomenal judgments. (...)
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  14. Ned Block (2002). Some Concepts of Consciousness. In D. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. 206-219.
    Consciousness is a mongrel concept: there are a number of very different "consciousnesses". Phenomenal consciousness is experience; the phenomenally conscious aspect of a state is what it is like to be in that state.
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  15. Ray Brassier, Alien Theory : The Decline of Materialism in the Name of Matter.
    The thesis tries to define and explain the rudiments of a 'nonphilosophical' or 'non-decisional' theory of materialism on the basis of a theoretical framework provided by the 'non-philosophy' of Francois Laruelle. Neither anti-philosophical nor anti-materialist in character, non-materialism tries to construct a rigorously transcendental theory of matter by using certain instances of philosophical materialism as its source material. The materialist decision to identify the real with matter is seen to retain a structural isomorphy with the phenomenological decision to identify the (...)
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  16. Paul Brazier (2008). Mary: Grace and Hope in Christ; the Text with Commentaries and Study Guide. By Donald Bolen and Gregory Cameron (Editors)Mary for Time and Eternity: Essays on Mary and Ecumenism. By William McLoughlin and Jill Pinnock (Editors)Mary: The Complete Resource. By Sarah Jane Boss (Editor). [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 49 (2):357–360.
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  17. P. W. Bridgman (1951). The Nature of Some of Our Physical Concepts. I. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 1 (4):257-272.
  18. P. W. Bridgman (1951). The Nature of Some of Our Physical Concepts--II. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):25-44.
  19. P. W. Bridgman (1951). The Nature of Some of Our Physical Concepts. III. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (6):142-160.
  20. Ross Cameron, Response to Dominic Gregory’s ‘Conceivability and Apparent Possibility’.
    forthcoming in a collection of papers (from OUP, edited by Bob Hale) given at the Arché modality conference, St Andrews University, 7th-9th June 2006.
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  21. Paul Carroll (1955). A Madrigal for Mary. Thought 30 (1):83-83.
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  22. Albert Casullo (1975). Conceivability and Possibility. Ratio 17 (1):118-121.
    The purpose of this article is to defend Hume's claim that whatever is conceivable is possible from a criticism by William Kneale. Kneale argues that although a mathematician can conceive of the falsehood of the Goldbach conjecture, he does not conclude that it is not necessarily true. The author suggests that by taking into account Hume's distinction between intuitive and demonstrative knowledge, a revised version of his claim can be offered which is not open to Kneale's criticism.
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  23. Chhanda Chakraborti (2002). Metaphysics of Consciousness, and David Chalmers's Property Dualism. Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 19 (2):59-84.
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  24. Aaron V. Cicourel (2010). In Memoriam of Mary Douglas (1921–2007). Mind and Society 9 (1):1-4.
    This is an excerpt from the contentIn the fall of 1970, as a visiting professor at London University, I was introduced to Mary Douglas by mutual friends at University College and the Institute of Education. In addition to having lunch periodically, we would join Basil Bernstein for a drink at a pub on Gower Street. Our meetings were casual and intellectually quite enjoyable. Mary was always quick to introduce research topics of mutual interest. When I joined Basil and she at (...)
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  25. Bowman L. Clarke (1980). Beard on the Conceivability of God's Non-Existence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):501-507.
  26. I. Situations Compromised (2008). Jon Barwise and John Perry. In Aloysius Martinich (ed.), The Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press. 420.
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  27. Kim Davies (2014). Emergence From What? A Transcendental Understanding of the Place of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 21 (5-6):10-32.
    This paper argues that the standard formulations of the question of how consciousness emerges, both synchronically and diachronically, from the physical world necessarily use a concept of the physical without either a clear grasp of the concept or an understanding of the necessary conditions of its possibility. This concept will be elucidated and some of the necessary conditions of its possibility explored, clarifying the place of the mental and the physical as abstractions from the totality of an agent engaged in (...)
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  28. Charles J. Deane (1943). Mary of the Magnificat. Thought 18 (3):565-565.
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  29. Charles J. Deane (1942). The Legion of Mary. Thought 17 (1):182-182.
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  30. Craig DeLancey (2013). The Modal Arguments and the Complexity of Consciousness. Ratio 26 (1):35-50.
    This paper explores consequences of the claim that phenomenal experiences are physical events of great descriptive complexity. This claim is attractive both because it can explain our most perplexing intuitions about the quality of consciousness and also because it is suggestive of very productive research opportunities. I illustrate the former by showing that two of the most compelling anti-physicalist arguments about phenomenal experience – the modal argument of Kripke and the conceivability argument of Chalmers – are not sound if this (...)
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  31. Fred Dretske (2003). How Do You Know You Are Not a Zombie? In Brie Gertler (ed.), Privileged Access: Philosophical Accounts of Self-Knowledge. Ashgate. 1--14.
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  32. H. P. Eden (1937). A Winter's Journey of Mary Stuart. Thought 12 (3):476-489.
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  33. Avshalom C. Elitzur (1995). Consciousness Can No Longer Be Ignored. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):353-58.
    Moody's thought-experiment invoking zombies to demonstrate the uniqueness of consciousness is commended. His conclusions accord well with previous ones arrived at by Penrose, Chalmers and myself. All these works lead to a disturbing conclusion: onsciousness, as something distinct from the brain processes, interferes with physical reality. Ergo, it is no longer possible to adhere to any of the modern theories of mind that preserve the completeness of physics. This conclusion is, in principle, testable.
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  34. Eno & S. S. Eno (1985). Appendix: Mary. The Saint Augustine Lecture Series:87-94.
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  35. R. C. W. Ettinger (2004). To Be or Not to Be: The Zombie in the Computer. In Nick Bostrom, R.C.W. Ettinger & Charles Tandy (eds.), Death and Anti-Death, Volume 2: Two Hundred Years After Kant, Fifty Years After Turing. Palo Alto: Ria University Press.
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  36. Owen J. Flanagan & Thomas W. Polger (1995). Zombies and the Function of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):313-21.
    Todd Moody’s Zombie Earth thought experiment is an attempt to show that ‘conscious inessentialism’ is false or in need of qualification. We defend conscious inessentialism against his criticisms, and argue that zombie thought experiments highlight the need to explain why consciousness evolved and what function(s) it serves. This is the hardest problem in consciousness studies.
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  37. George S. Fullerton (1886). Conceivability and the Infinite. Mind 11 (42):186-202.
  38. Martina Fürst (2006). There's Something About Mary. [REVIEW] Croatian Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):145-149.
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  39. John Gardner, What It is Like to Perceive Colour.
    I argue that the knowledge argument is best understood as an argument for the existence of non-physical properties of material objects, or colours. I suggest that the knowledge argument is standardly presented as an argument for the existence of qualia because it is implicitly assumed that physics “tell us” that what it is like to perceive colour is determined, not by properties of material objects, but by properties of perceiving subjects; hence any gaps in Mary’s knowledge must be gaps in (...)
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  40. Brie Gertler (2002). Review of John Perry, Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (1).
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  41. Olav Gjelsvik (1987). A Kripkean Objection to Kripke's Argument Against Identity-Theories. Inquiry 30 (4):435 – 450.
    This paper analyses and criticizes S. Kripke's celebrated argument against materialist identity?theories. While criticisms of Kripke in the literature attack one or more of his premisses, an attempt is made here to show that Kripke's conclusion is unjustified even if his premisses are accepted. Kripke's premisses have sufficient independent plausibility to make this strategy interesting. Having stated Kripke's argument, it is pointed out that Kripke must assume that the contents of the Cartesian intuitions are clear and of a kind suited (...)
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  42. Benedikt Paul Göcke (ed.) (2012). After Physicalism. The University of Notre Dame Press.
    Although physicalism has been the dominant position in recent work in the philosophy of mind, this dominance has not prevented a small but growing number of philosophers from arguing that physicalism is untenable for several reasons: both ontologically and epistemologically it cannot reduce mentality to the realm of the physical, and its attempts to reduce subjectivity to objectivity have thoroughly failed. The contributors to After Physicalism provide powerful alternatives to the physicalist account of the human mind from a dualistic point (...)
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  43. Lorna Green, Introduction to All My Works 2012.
    I am proposing a new Copernican revolution, that Consciousness and not matter is the true basis of the universe. Here is an account of my graduate student days at the Rockefeller University as a woman pioneer in science, and a sense of what I am really about in all of my works. I am giving a woman's take on the universe.
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  44. Lorna Green (ed.) (2005). The Reign of the Holy Spirit, Christ-Self: I Am. iUniverse.
    The truth of human indentity in the consciousness universe.
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  45. Lorna Green (2003). Beyond Chance and Necessity. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (4):270-286.
    These essays propose a new "Copernican Revolution": Consciousness, not matter, is basic in the universe. They are non-technical, simply and clearly written.
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  46. J. B. S. Haldane (1934). Quantum Mechanics as a Basis for Philosophy. Philosophy of Science 1 (1):78-98.
  47. Woojin Han (2008). The Conditional Analysis of Phenomenal Concepts. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 42:77-84.
    John Hawthorne (2002), David Braddon-Mitchell (2003), and Robert Stalnaker (2002), almost simultaneously but independently, developed a physicalistic argument which depends on such two conditional analyses: (1) If we experience dualistic pain, zombies are possible; (2) If our world is physicalistic, zombies are impossible. Hawthorne assumes that only an oracle will tell us which conditional is the case. From this setting, he concludes that zombies are conceivable butimpossible. I first show that Hawthorne actually fails in deriving neither the conceivability of zombies (...)
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  48. Rm Harnish (1992). Refuting Kripke: The Modal Arguments and the Epistemic Arguments. Conceptus 26 (68-69):79-95.
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  49. Christopher S. Hill (2005). Remarks on David Papineau's Thinking About Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (1):147–147.
    Thinking about Consciousness is a wonderfully clear and vigorous commen- tary on the nature of consciousness and its relationship to brain processes. It advances the contemporary discussion of a number of important issues, but it also introduces several quite valuable ideas that are independent of the con- temporary literature. Papineau has performed an important service by writing it.
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  50. Eli Hirsch (2009). Kripke's Argument Against Materialism. In Robert C. Koons & George Bealer (eds.), The Waning of Materialism: New Essays. Oxford University Press.
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