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  1. Ira B. Albert & Nicholas C. Ballas (1973). Electroencephalographic and Temporal Correlates of Snoring. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 1 (3):169-170.
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  2. I. Aleksander & H. Morton (2008). Computational Studies of Consciousness. In Rahul Banerjee & B. K. Chakrabarti (eds.), Models of Brain and Mind: Physical, Computational, and Psychological Approaches. Elsevier.
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  3. Maria Alessandria, Roberto Vetrugno, Pietro Cortelli & Pasquale Montagna (2011). Normal Body Scheme and Absent Phantom Limb Experience in Amputees While Dreaming. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1831-1834.
    While dreaming amputees often experience a normal body image and the phantom limb may not be present. However, dreaming experiences in amputees have mainly been collected by questionnaires. We analysed the dream reports of amputated patients with phantom limb collected after awakening from REM sleep during overnight videopolysomnography . Six amputated patients underwent overnight VPSG study. Patients were awakened during REM sleep and asked to report their dreams. Three patients were able to deliver an account of a dream. In all (...)
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  4. M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier & H. F. James (1998). Toward the Neurobiology of Consciousness: Using Brain Imaging and Anesthesia to Investigate the Anatomy of Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.
  5. M. T. Alkire & Jeff G. Miller (2006). General Anesthesia and the Neural Correlates of Consciousness. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
  6. Colin Allen (2010). Mirror, Mirror in the Brain, What's the Monkey Stand to Gain? Noûs 44 (2):372 - 391.
    Primatologists generally agree that monkeys lack higher-order intentional capacities related to theory of mind. Yet the discovery of the so-called "mirror neurons" in monkeys suggests to many neuroscientists that they have the rudiments of intentional understanding. Given a standard philosophical view about intentional understanding, which requires higher-order intentionahty, a paradox arises. Different ways of resolving the paradox are assessed, using evidence from neural, cognitive, and behavioral studies of humans and monkeys. A decisive resolution to the paradox requires substantial additional empirical (...)
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  7. Xavier F. Amador & Anthony S. David (eds.) (2004). Insight And Psychosis: Awareness of Illness in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders. Oxford University Press, USA.
    These are integrated and synthesised bythe editors, both acknowledged experts in the field. The scope is truly international and spans theoretical perspectives, clinical practice, and consumer views.
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  8. Jackie Andrade, Rajesh Munglani, J. Gareth Jones & Alan D. Baddeley (1994). Cognitive Performance During Anesthesia. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (2):148-165.
    This paper explores the changes in cognitive function which occur as someone "loses consciousness" under anesthesia. Seven volunteers attempted a categorization task and a within-list recognition test while inhaling air, 0.2% isoflurane, and 0.4% isoflurane. In general, performance on these tests declined as the dose of anesthetic was increased and returned to baseline after 10 min of breathing air. A measure of auditory evoked responding termed "coherent frequency" showed parallel changes. At 0.2% isoflurane, subjects could still identify and respond to (...)
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  9. Michael A. Arbib & Péter Érdi (2000). Précis of Neural Organization: Structure, Function, and Dynamics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):513-533.
    Neural organization: Structure, function, and dynamics shows how theory and experiment can supplement each other in an integrated, evolving account of the brain's structure, function, and dynamics. (1) Structure: Studies of brain function and dynamics build on and contribute to an understanding of many brain regions, the neural circuits that constitute them, and their spatial relations. We emphasize Szentágothai's modular architectonics principle, but also stress the importance of the microcomplexes of cerebellar circuitry and the lamellae of hippocampus. (2) Function: Control (...)
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  10. P. Århem & B. I. B. Lindahl (1993). Neuroscience and the Problem of Consciousness: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches. An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine 14 (2):77-88.
  11. Peter Århem & Hans Liljenström (2008). Beyond Cognition - on Consciousness Transitions. In Hans Liljenström & Peter Århem (eds.), Consciousness Transitions: Phylogenetic, Ontogenetic, and Physiological Aspects. Elsevier.
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  12. Shireen Assaf & Marwan Khawaja (2009). Consanguinity Trends and Correlates in the Palestinian Territories. Journal of Biosocial Science 41 (1):107.
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  13. Anthony P. Atkinson, Michael S. C. Thomas & Axel Cleeremans (2000). Consciousness: Mapping the Theoretical Landscape. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (10):372-382.
    What makes us conscious? Many theories that attempt to answer this question have appeared recently in the context of widespread interest about consciousness in the cognitive neurosciences. Most of these proposals are formulated in terms of the information processing conducted by the brain. In this overview, we survey and contrast these models. We first delineate several notions of consciousness, addressing what it is that the various models are attempting to explain. Next, we describe a conceptual landscape that addresses how the (...)
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  14. Harald Atmanspacher (2006). Consciousness: A Mathematical Treatment of the Global Neuronal Workspace Model. Acta Biotheoretica 54 (2):157-160.
  15. George Austin, William Hayward & Stanley Rouhe (1974). A Note on the Problem of Conscious Man and Cerebral Disconnection by Hemispherectomy. In Marcel Kinsbourne & W. Smith (eds.), Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function. Charles C. 95.
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  16. Bernard J. Baars (2008). Conscious Contents Provide Coherent, Global Information. In Hans Liljenström & Peter Århem (eds.), Consciousness Transitions: Phylogenetic, Ontogenetic, and Physiological Aspects. Elsevier.
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  17. Bernard J. Baars (2006). Global Workspace Theory of Consciousness: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Human Experience? In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
  18. Bernard J. Baars (1999). Attention Vs Consciousness in the Visual Brain: Differences in Conception, Phenomenology, Behavior, Neuroanatomy, and Physiology. Journal of General Psychology 126:224-33.
  19. Bernard J. Baars (1997). Spatial Brain Coherence During the Establishment of a Conscious Event. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (1):1-2.
  20. Bernard J. Baars & Katharine McGovern (1993). Does Philosophy Help or Hinder Scientific Work on Consciousness? Consciousness and Cognition 2 (1):18-27.
  21. Werner Backhaus (1999). How to Compare Color Sensations in Different Brains. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):944-945.
    The qualitative and quantitative properties of color sensations and neuronal color coding are discussed in relation to physiological color exchanges and their evolutionary constraints. Based on the identity mind/matter thesis, additional physical measurements on color sensations are described that will allow us, at least in principle, to compare the qualitative properties of color sensations in different brains.
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  22. David Badre (2011). Defining an Ontology of Cognitive Control Requires Attention to Component Interactions. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):217-221.
    Cognitive control is not only componential, but those components may interact in complicated ways in the service of cognitive control tasks. This complexity poses a challenge for developing an ontological description, because the mapping may not be direct between our task descriptions and true component differences reflected in indicators. To illustrate this point, I discuss two examples: (a) the relationship between adaptive gating and working memory and (b) the recent evidence for a control hierarchy. From these examples, I argue that (...)
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  23. R. Banerjee (2008). Buddha and the Bridging Relations. In Rahul Banerjee & B. K. Chakrabarti (eds.), Models of Brain and Mind: Physical, Computational, and Psychological Approaches. Elsevier.
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  24. Rahul Banerjee & B. K. Chakrabarti (eds.) (2008). Models of Brain and Mind: Physical, Computational, and Psychological Approaches. Elsevier.
    The phenomenon of consciousness has always been a central question for philosophers and scientists. Emerging in the past decade are new approaches to the understanding of consciousness in a scientific light. This book presents a series of essays by leading thinkers giving an account of the current ideas prevalent in the scientific study of consciousness. The value of the book lies in the discussion of this interesting though complex subject from different points of view ranging from physics, computer science to (...)
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  25. William P. Banks (2006). Does Consciousness Cause Misbehavior? In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 235-256.
  26. William P. Banks (2002). On Timing Relations Between Brain and World. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):141-143.
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  27. William P. Banks (1995). Evidence for Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):270-272.
  28. William P. Banks (1993). Problems in the Scientific Pursuit of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (4):255-263.
  29. Horace Barlow (2001). The Exploitation of Regularities in the Environment by the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):602-607.
    Statistical regularities of the environment are important for learning, memory, intelligence, inductive inference, and in fact, for any area of cognitive science where an information-processing brain promotes survival by exploiting them. This has been recognised by many of those interested in cognitive function, starting with Helmholtz, Mach, and Pearson, and continuing through Craik, Tolman, Attneave, and Brunswik. In the current era, many of us have begun to show how neural mechanisms exploit the regular statistical properties of natural images. Shepard proposed (...)
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  30. Hazel E. Barnes (2006). Consciousness and Digestion: Sartre and Neuroscience. Sartre Studies International 11 (1-2):117-132.
    While Sartre scholars cannot fairly be described as being opposed to science, they have, for the most part, stayed aloof. The field of psychology, of course, has been an exception. Sartre himself felt compelled to present his own existential psychoanalysis by marking the parallels and differences between his position and traditional approaches, particularly the Freudian. The same is true with respect to his concept of bad faith and of emotional behavior. Scholars have followed his lead with richly productive results. But (...)
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  31. Hazel E. Barnes (2005). Consciousness and Digestion Sartre and Neuroscience. Sartre Studies International 11 (s 1-2):117-132.
    While Sartre scholars cannot fairly be described as being opposed to science, they have, for the most part, stayed aloof. The field of psychology, of course, has been an exception. Sartre himself felt compelled to present his own existential psychoanalysis by marking the parallels and differences between his position and traditional approaches, particularly the Freudian. The same is true with respect to his concept of bad faith and of emotional behavior. Scholars have followed his lead with richly productive results. But (...)
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  32. Gary Bartlett (2012). The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):451 - 455.
    Philosophical Psychology, Volume 25, Issue 3, Page 451-455, June 2012.
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  33. Roger Bartra (2007). Antropología Del Cerebro: La Conciencia y Los Sistemas Simbólicos. Pre-Textos.
    Este libro expone, desde el punto de vista de un antrop logo, los extraordinarios avances de las ciencias dedicadas a explorar el cerebro humano.
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  34. Tim Bayne (2007). Conscious States and Conscious Creatures: Explanation in the Scientific Study of Consciousness. Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):1–22.
    Explanation does not exist in a metaphysical vacuum. Conceptions of the structure of a phenomenon play an important role in guiding attempts to explain it, and erroneous conceptions of a phenomenon may direct investigation in misleading directions. I believe that there is a case to be made for thinking that much work on the neural underpinnings of consciousness—what is often called the neural correlates of consciousness—is driven by an erroneous conception of the structure of consciousness. The aim of this paper (...)
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  35. Tim Bayne (2007). Hypnosis and the Unity of Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 93-109.
    Hypnosis appears to generate unusual—and sometimes even astonishing—changes in the contents of consciousness. Hypnotic subjects report perceiving things that are not there, they report not perceiving things that are there, and they report unusual alterations in the phenomenology of agency. In addition to apparent alterations in the contents of consciousness, hypnosis also appears to involve alterations in the structure of consciousness. According to many theorists—most notably Hilgard—hypnosis demonstrates that the unity of consciousness is an illusion (Hilgard 1977).
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  36. Tim Bayne (2007). Hypnosis and the Unity of Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    Hypnosis appears to generate unusual—and sometimes even astonishing—changes in the contents of consciousness. Hypnotic subjects report perceiving things that are not there, they report not perceiving things that are there, and they report unusual alterations in the phenomenology of agency. In addition to apparent alterations in the contents of consciousness, hypnosis also appears to involve alterations in the structure of consciousness. According to many theorists—most notably Hilgard—hypnosis demonstrates that the unity of consciousness is an illusion (Hilgard 1977).
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  37. Timothy Bayne (2004). Phenomenology and the Feeling of Doing : Wegner on the Conscious Will. In Susan Pockett (ed.), Does Consciousness Cause Behaviour? Mit Press.
    Given its ubiquitous presence in everyday experience, it is surprising that the phenomenology of doing—the experience of being an agent—has received such scant attention in the consciousness literature. But things are starting to change, and a small but growing literature on the content and causes of the phenomenology of first-person agency is beginning to emerge.2 One of the most influential and stimulating figures in this literature is Daniel Wegner. In a series of papers and his book The Illusion of Conscious (...)
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  38. Timothy J. Bayne (2004). Phenomenology and the Feeling of Doing : Wegner on the Conscious Will. In Susan Pockett (ed.), Does Consciousness Cause Behaviour? Mit Press.
    Given its ubiquitous presence in everyday experience, it is surprising that the phenomenology of doing—the experience of being an agent—has received such scant attention in the consciousness literature. But things are starting to change, and a small but growing literature on the content and causes of the phenomenology of first-person agency is beginning to emerge.2 One of the most influential and stimulating figures in this literature is Daniel Wegner. In a series of papers and his book The Illusion of Conscious (...)
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  39. Ansgar Beckermann (2000). The Perennial Problem of the Reductive Explainability of Phenomenal Consciousness: C. D. Broad on the Explanatory Gap. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. Mit Press.
    At the start of the 20th century the question of whether life could be explained in purely me- chanical terms was as hotly debated as the mind-body problem is today. Two factions opposed each other: Biological mechanists claimed that the properties characteristic of living organisms could be ex- plained mechanistically, in the way the behavior of a clock can be explained by the properties and the arrangement of its cogs, springs, and weights. Substantial vitalists, on the other hand, maintained that (...)
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  40. B. Bermond (2001). A Neuropsychological and Evolutionary Approach to Animal Consciousness and Animal Suffering. Animal Welfare Supplement 10:47- 62.
  41. Jose Luis Bermudez (2000). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Primitive Self-Consciousness. Psycoloquy 11 (35).
    Myin, Erik (2000) Direct Self-Consciousness (2)Bermúdez, José Luis (2000) Concepts and the Priority Principle (10)Bermúdez, José Luis (2000) Circularity, "I"-Thoughts and the Linguistic Requirement for Concept Possession (11)Meeks, Roblin R. (2000) Withholding Immunity: Misidentification, Misrepresentation, and Autonomous Nonconceptual Proprioceptive First-Person Content (12)Newen, Albert (2001) Kinds of Self-Consciousness (13)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) Direct Self-Consciousness (4)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) Prelinguistic Self-Consciousness (5)Gallese, Vittorio (2000) The Brain and the Self: Reviewing the Neuroscientific Evidence (6)Bermudez, Jose Luis (2000) The Cognitive Neuroscience of Primitive Self-Consciousness (...)
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  42. Marica Bernstein, Samantha Stiehl & John Bickle (2000). The Effect of Motivation on the Stream of Consciousness: Generalizing From a Neurocomputational Model of Cingulo-Frontal Circuits Controlling Saccadic Eye Movements. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins. 133-160.
  43. R. J. A. Berry (1934). The Cortical Localization of Cerebral Function (the Henderson Trust Lectures, No. XII). The Eugenics Review 25 (4):278.
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  44. Mark Bevir & Karsten Stueber (2011). Empathy, Rationality, and Explanation. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (2):147-162.
    This paper describes the historical background to contemporary discussions of empathy and rationality. It looks at the philosophy of mind and its implications for action explanation and the philosophy of history. In the nineteenth century, the concept of empathy became prominent within philosophical aesthetics, from where it was extended to describe the way we grasp other minds. This idea of empathy as a way of understanding others echoed through later accounts of historical understanding as involving re-enactment, noticeably that of R. (...)
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  45. J. Bickle, C. Worley & M. Bernstein (2000). Vector Subtraction Implemented Neurally: A Neurocomputational Model of Some Sequential Cognitive and Conscious Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (1):117-144.
    Although great progress in neuroanatomy and physiology has occurred lately, we still cannot go directly to those levels to discover the neural mechanisms of higher cognition and consciousness. But we can use neurocomputational methods based on these details to push this project forward. Here we describe vector subtraction as an operation that computes sequential paths through high-dimensional vector spaces. Vector-space interpretations of network activity patterns are a fruitful resource in recent computational neuroscience. Vector subtraction also appears to be implemented neurally (...)
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  46. Erhard Bieberich, In Search of a Neuronal Substrate of the Human Mind: New Concepts From "Topological Neurochemistry".
    Neurochemistry is a powerful discipline of modern neuroscience based on a description of neuronal function in terms of molecular reaction and interaction. This study aims at a neurochemical approach to the "hard" philosophical mind-body problem: the search for the neuronal correlate of consciousness. The scattered pattern of remote areas in the human brain simultaneously busy with the computation of single perceptions has left us with the unanswered questions why, where, and how the neuronal activity gives rise to a unified conscious (...)
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  47. Leslie M. Blaha, T. Busey & James T. Townsend (2009). An LDA Approach to the Neural Correlates of Configural Learning. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
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  48. Colin Blakemore & Susan A. Greenfield (1987). Mindwaves: Thoughts on Intelligence, Identity, and Consciousness. Blackwell.
  49. Olaf Blanke & Christine Mohr (2005). Out-of-Body Experience, Heautoscopy, and Autoscopic Hallucination of Neurological Origin. Implications for Neurocognitive Mechanisms of Corporeal Awareness and Self Consciousness. Brain Research Reviews 50 (1):184-199.
  50. Ned Block (1996). How Not to Find the Neural Correlate of Consciousness. In João Branquinho (ed.), [Book Chapter] (Unpublished). Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1.
    There are two concepts of consciousness that are easy to confuse with one another, access-consciousness and phenomenal consciousness. However, just as the concepts of water and H2O are different concepts of the same thing, so the two concepts of consciousness may come to the same thing in the brain. The focus of this paper is on the problems that arise when these two concepts of consciousness are conflated. I will argue that John Searle’s reasoning about the function of consciousness goes (...)
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